Patrick Nicholas

A few Grand Prix thoughts

So assignments came out Monday, and we’ve had time to digest retirements, non-retirements, and Jeremy Abbott apparently not retiring but skipping the Grand Prix anyway(if it gets him to Boston, we should be glad for it).  A few thoughts:

Of course the initial rosters and the final lineups for these events can often be very different, thanks to all the withdrawals that happen in the meantime, but…

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Mr. Holmes (2015) Review

Mr. Holmes (2015) Review

An aged Sherlock is seen trying to remember different parts of his life and the final case that stopped him from taking on anymore. But will we ever know exactly how it all ended?

(more…)

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аноним спросил(а):

what are names you like for your future kids?

Boy: Aiden, Patrick, Nicholas (but I don’t like the name Nick so I probably won’t use that one)

Girl: Grace (don’t care that it’s my middle name), Reagan (pretty sure I stole this one from tommibinns), Emma, Autumn (I really like Autumn but I still don’t know if I’d actually name my child after it)

Tag 10 people

so was tagged by i-needed-something-new
Name: Alissa
Nickname: Liss/Lissa, Sunshine
Birthday: September 24, 1997
Star Sign: Libra
Height: 5′5″
Favorite color:Pink
Current time: 2:36 pm
Hours I sleep on Average: not enough
Lucky number: 6
Last Google search: Warped Tour 2015 line up Atlanta
Random Word that Comes to My Mind: home
Happy place: My room
Number of blankets I sleep under: 3 or 4 depending on the day
Favorite fictional character: Garnet, Arya Stark, Effy Stonem 
Favorite Famous Person: Patrick Stump
Celebrity Crush: Nicholas Hoult, Kit Harington 
Favorite book: Im not done yet, but I think it might be Valhalla by Ari Back 
Last Movie I Saw: Spy
Dream Trip: European tour or the moon

Im tagging laughforallthedays disconcertedhipster porcelain-panic111 peterpannutbutter saddestfries turboturtletaskforce @everyone else

theguardian.com
The Clegg catastrophe | Patrick Wintour and Nicholas Watt
The long read: Did the Lib Dems sell out their principles — or just lose their way? Patrick Wintour and Nicholas Watt examine the electoral disaster that has nearly destroyed the party
Автор: Nicholas Watt

I hate how these people come up with all these bullshit reasons for why the Lib Dems got a kicking.

“But I think tuition fees became the mantra you can deploy for a feeling you cannot explain to yourself. If it had not been tuition fees, it would have been health or the bedroom tax – it was driven by a general dislike of politicians, a general disbelief in politicians sticking to their word, and the way in which the smaller partner in a coalition always gets a kicking.” 

“The disaster over the Farage debate was there was a Liberal Democrat leader who was representing the establishment,”

“But the old adage of ‘If you’re in the middle of the road, you might get run over’ operated in spades. We were in the middle of the road without any distinction – we had no visibility jacket on. No one could see us, so we really did get run over.”

You were a pack of bastards the moment you got into government and enthusiastically put twatting about in Westminster above everything else. You put disabled people in front of ATOS and the blood from the suicides is on your hands. Now you’re fucked for a generation and good riddance you cunts.

This made me laugh though

Recently, Clegg was approached by a distressed woman while shopping on his local high street in Putney. Speaking through tears, she told Clegg that his party did not deserve the battering it had received from the British electorate. Buoyed by the heartfelt sympathy from a wellwisher, Clegg told the woman not to worry and thanked her for supporting the Lib Dems – only to be told that she had voted Green.

The lesson, Lotinga said, was: “Never go to China if you want to mount a coup.” Cable was completely cut off. “If you go as a government minister, they take your phone off you. He could not phone the people he needed to find out what was going on, and he was entirely reliant on us to be told what was happening back in Britain. He panicked.”
The Clegg catastrophe | Patrick Wintour and Nicholas Watt

Did the Lib Dems sell out their principles — or just lose their way? Patrick Wintour and Nicholas Watt examine the electoral disaster that has nearly destroyed the party

On Thursday 17 April 2014, the Liberal Democrat peer Lord Oakeshott, an old personal friend of the business secretary Vince Cable, sent an email to Cable’s wife, Rachel. It contained the results of a private poll, commissioned by Oakeshott from the respected polling firm ICM, of six Lib Dem seats. It showed that Cable was already trailing in his Twickenham constituency. Oakeshott followed up the email with a text to Cable himself, stressing that his secretary’s discretion could be relied upon and explaining that Cable’s special adviser had “asked me to forward the poll to your wife”. Oakeshott signed off his text: “Happy to discuss on mob now, or we are back home tea time Sunday.”

The timing of the poll, and the surrounding secrecy, was not a coincidence. Oakeshott, a stalwart of the party’s social democratic left wing and a vocal critic of the Tory-Lib Dem coalition’s economic policies, had long been a political opponent of Nick Clegg. The Liberal Democrat leader was on the brink of an expected disaster in local and European elections the following month – the voters’ roar of disapproval at his decision to go into coalition with the Conservatives. Oakeshott regarded the forthcoming electoral drubbing as the last chance to remove Clegg, whom he had long seen as a political disaster for the party. “It felt like the scene in Far from the Madding Crowd when the sheep charge over the hill together,” Oakeshott recalled. “I thought ‘Oh my God, this is it’. In the face of all available evidence – in council elections, byelections and opinion polls – there was collective self-delusion, and the party was going to press ahead to disaster.”

Continue reading…

from Network Front | The Guardian http://ift.tt/1GqP94Z
The warning shots had been fired by the dissidents. But Clegg trundled on, dutifully carrying out the masochism strategy by turning up every Thursday morning for his weekly mauling at the hands of LBC listeners on his “Call Clegg” phone-in programme. These radio appearances were not only painful, they were time-consuming: each one required that he be prepped as if facing prime minister’s questions – on subjects ranging from the latest developments in Syria to the case of a Sheffield United footballer charged with rape. “Ignorance was never an option”, one of his exhausted aides admitted.
Baroness Grender, Clegg’s communications adviser at the time, admitted that the apology did not work – but she believes that it was worth trying. “There was very little advice against it,” she said recently. “The risk was that it achieved nothing and simply raised the issue again – and in a way that confirmed betrayal as the standard narrative. But I think tuition fees became the mantra you can deploy for a feeling you cannot explain to yourself. If it had not been tuition fees, it would have been health or the bedroom tax – it was driven by a general dislike of politicians, a general disbelief in politicians sticking to their word, and the way in which the smaller partner in a coalition always gets a kicking.”