Patents

Contamination-seeking drones - IBM Patent 9447448.

Stay back and let the drones do the dirty work. Patent 9447448 makes cognitive drones able to inspect and decontaminate places so humans don’t have to. The drones’ on-board AI system can collect and analyze samples, so it can identify and clean up any bacteria or outbreak. Meanwhile you get to hang back, safely out of harm’s way.


This is just one of the record-breaking 8,000+ patents IBM received this year. Explore the latest IBM patents. →

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Enjoy these registered patent labels for products created for and marketed to women! From the shoe-damaging perils of driving a car to keeping your hands clean while cooking patty-shaped foods, inventors know what ladies need.

All of the labels are from Record Group 241, Records of the Patent and Trademark Office. These patent labels have been digitized and will soon be available in the National Archives Catalog (archives.catalog.gov)

Friend of a Fiend?

Brian from softball sends you a friend request. He’s an all around good guy—punctual, complimentary, clean, the works! Go ahead and accept him. WAIT. Don’t do it. That is, don’t do it unless he’s been put to the test. IBM Patent No. 8,706,648 goes beyond Brian to calculate the digital or social media risk his friends pose to your personal Internet security. Just like in real life, some of your friends run with a bad crowd. Thankfully, In the cyber world, now something can protect you from such hijinks. (But if his friends start a big ruckus in the stands, you’re still on your own.) Discover more innovations from 22 record years →

More understanding machines - IBM Patent 9384450.

What if we could learn from questions the same way we learn from answers? Patent 9384450 improves AI’s ability to answer what are called “open domain questions”, or questions that ask information outside of a machine’s previous knowledge. Machines may have a lot to learn, but now we can teach them to understand us better.


This is just one of the record-breaking 8,000+ patents IBM received this year. Explore the latest IBM patents. →

‘The present is theirs; the future, for which I really worked, is mine.’
Nikola Tesla

This is from a personal project. Tesla explaining his visions and inventions to Lyudmila -a strange traveler who mysteriously appeared during a severe storm at Tesla’s lab in Colorado asking for help …(Lyudmila’s an original character).
+ it’s always nice to have an excuse to draw some Tesla :)

Lyudmila’s character design
-Some older Tesla art:
Tesla character design #1
Tesla character design #2
Pure white with light grey tips on its wings



Titanic clash over CRISPR patents turns ugly

Geneticist George Church has pioneered methods for sequencing and altering genomes. He has been called a founding father of synthetic biology, and is probably the world’s leading authority on efforts to resurrect the extinct woolly mammoth.

Now, a battle over who owns the patent rights to a revolutionary gene-editing technique could hinge, in part, on whether Church’s scientific skill could be considered ‘ordinary’.

Such are the arcane and often bizarre issues the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) must consider in the fight over CRISPR–Cas9 gene editing. But the proceedings, which could drag out for years, have taken an ugly turn from scientific minutiae to accusations of impropriety. “There seem to be a number of allegations of bad actors and bad faith,” says Jacob Sherkow, a legal scholar at New York Law School in New York City. “It’s aggressive.”Geneticist George Church has pioneered methods for sequencing and altering genomes. He has been called a founding father of synthetic biology, and is probably the world’s leading authority on efforts to resurrect the extinct woolly mammoth.Now, a battle over who owns the patent rights to a revolutionary gene-editing technique could hinge, in part, on whether Church’s scientific skill could be considered ‘ordinary’.Such are the arcane and often bizarre issues the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) must consider in the fight over CRISPR–Cas9 gene editing. But the proceedings, which could drag out for years, have taken an ugly turn from scientific minutiae to accusations of impropriety. “There seem to be a number of allegations of bad actors and bad faith,” says Jacob Sherkow, a legal scholar at New York Law School in New York City. “It’s aggressive.”

Cas9 (red) uses an RNA guide (green) to cut DNA, Molekull/SPL

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The 3 Biggest Myths Blinding Us to the Economic Truth

1. The “job creators” are CEOs, corporations, and the rich, whose taxes must be low in order to induce them to create more jobs. Rubbish. The real job creators are the vast middle class and the poor, whose spending induces businesses to create jobs. Which is why raising the minimum wage, extending overtime protection, enlarging the Earned Income Tax Credit, and reducing middle-class taxes are all necessary.

2. The critical choice is between the “free market” or “government.” Baloney. The free market doesn’t exist in nature. It’s created and enforced by government. And all the ongoing decisions about how it’s organized – what gets patent protection and for how long (the human genome?), who can declare bankruptcy (corporations? homeowners? student debtors?), what contracts are fraudulent (insider trading?) or coercive (predatory loans? mandatory arbitration?), and how much market power is excessive (Comcast and Time Warner?) – depend on government.

3. We should worry most about the size of government. Wrong. We should worry about who government is for. When big money from giant corporations and Wall Street inundate our politics, all decisions relating to #1 and #2 above become rigged against average working Americans.

Please take a look at our video, and share.

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InventHelp's INPEX Seeks to Play Matchmaker for Inventors and Companies

InventHelp’s INPEX is America’s Largest Invention Trade Show.
Inventors converge onto Pittsburgh every year to display their
inventions and new products in the hopes of meeting companies who are
interested in taking on new products for their own companies.

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Today the Coca-Cola bottle is one of the most recognizable containers in the world, but a century ago nearly all soda bottles looked the same.

To distinguish its product from competitors, the Coca-Cola Company launched a competition in 1915 among glassmakers to design a new bottle that was unique in both look and feel.

The winning design, patented by the Root Glass Company of Terre Haute, had a fluted contour shape that was modeled after the cacao pod, the main ingredient in chocolate. However the original prototype was never manufactured because it was top-heavy and unstable.

The first commercial “Coke” bottles debuted with a wider base and slimmed-down, contoured shape. This silhouette became so unmistakable that in 1961 the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office gave it trademark status.

See the original patent in person at the National Archives in Washington, DC, from June 4 through July 29, 2015, in the West Rotunda Gallery; and from October 29 through December 2, 2015, in the East Rotunda Gallery.

Images: Original Coke Bottle Patent, November 16, 1915. (Records of the Patent and Trademark Office, National Archives)

Men of the 133rd Field Artillery Battalion enjoy Cokes on the front, March 17, 1944. (Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer, National Archives)

Military Police officers toast with their Coca-Colas at a “Retreat Club,” July 21, 1945. (Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer, National Archives)

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Happy Inventors’ Day! Wait, the inventors have their own day? Of course they do! They take creative risks in the name of making life easier, so they’ve earned it. This day also marks the unofficial end to our celebration of 22 record breaking years. A reminder that although over six million patents exist, somehow there are always more to be conceived. So don’t just sit there, get on with it!

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Patent of the Month: Tucker “Torpedo”

During World War II, the South Side of Chicago was home to one of the largest war plants in the country, used by Dodge-Chrysler to build bomber plane engines. After the war, Preston Tucker leased two of the buildings to build his “Torpedo” car. This site is now the home of the National Archives at Chicago! 

Read the full post on the AOTUS blog.

Image: Tucker “Torpedo” Patent Drawing, 06/14/1949. National Archives Identifier 594674

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3D Printing: Engineers, Designers, and everyday consumers are using this new fabrication process to conceptualize and create things that were once impossible. But what does this mean for the future of manufacturing and where do these 3D prints fall on the thin line between copyright infringement and fair use? 

Is it possible that 3D printing will do for objects what MP3s did for music; by once again radically transforming the way we look at copyright?