Patents

Contamination-seeking drones - IBM Patent 9447448.

Stay back and let the drones do the dirty work. Patent 9447448 makes cognitive drones able to inspect and decontaminate places so humans don’t have to. The drones’ on-board AI system can collect and analyze samples, so it can identify and clean up any bacteria or outbreak. Meanwhile you get to hang back, safely out of harm’s way.


This is just one of the record-breaking 8,000+ patents IBM received this year. Explore the latest IBM patents. →

huffingtonpost.com
InventHelp's INPEX Seeks to Play Matchmaker for Inventors and Companies

InventHelp’s INPEX is America’s Largest Invention Trade Show.
Inventors converge onto Pittsburgh every year to display their
inventions and new products in the hopes of meeting companies who are
interested in taking on new products for their own companies.

5

Enjoy these registered patent labels for products created for and marketed to women! From the shoe-damaging perils of driving a car to keeping your hands clean while cooking patty-shaped foods, inventors know what ladies need.

All of the labels are from Record Group 241, Records of the Patent and Trademark Office. These patent labels have been digitized and will soon be available in the National Archives Catalog (archives.catalog.gov)

Friend of a Fiend?

Brian from softball sends you a friend request. He’s an all around good guy—punctual, complimentary, clean, the works! Go ahead and accept him. WAIT. Don’t do it. That is, don’t do it unless he’s been put to the test. IBM Patent No. 8,706,648 goes beyond Brian to calculate the digital or social media risk his friends pose to your personal Internet security. Just like in real life, some of your friends run with a bad crowd. Thankfully, In the cyber world, now something can protect you from such hijinks. (But if his friends start a big ruckus in the stands, you’re still on your own.) Discover more innovations from 22 record years →

Titanic clash over CRISPR patents turns ugly

Geneticist George Church has pioneered methods for sequencing and altering genomes. He has been called a founding father of synthetic biology, and is probably the world’s leading authority on efforts to resurrect the extinct woolly mammoth.

Now, a battle over who owns the patent rights to a revolutionary gene-editing technique could hinge, in part, on whether Church’s scientific skill could be considered ‘ordinary’.

Such are the arcane and often bizarre issues the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) must consider in the fight over CRISPR–Cas9 gene editing. But the proceedings, which could drag out for years, have taken an ugly turn from scientific minutiae to accusations of impropriety. “There seem to be a number of allegations of bad actors and bad faith,” says Jacob Sherkow, a legal scholar at New York Law School in New York City. “It’s aggressive.”Geneticist George Church has pioneered methods for sequencing and altering genomes. He has been called a founding father of synthetic biology, and is probably the world’s leading authority on efforts to resurrect the extinct woolly mammoth.Now, a battle over who owns the patent rights to a revolutionary gene-editing technique could hinge, in part, on whether Church’s scientific skill could be considered ‘ordinary’.Such are the arcane and often bizarre issues the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) must consider in the fight over CRISPR–Cas9 gene editing. But the proceedings, which could drag out for years, have taken an ugly turn from scientific minutiae to accusations of impropriety. “There seem to be a number of allegations of bad actors and bad faith,” says Jacob Sherkow, a legal scholar at New York Law School in New York City. “It’s aggressive.”

Cas9 (red) uses an RNA guide (green) to cut DNA, Molekull/SPL

2

Patent of the Month: Tucker “Torpedo”

During World War II, the South Side of Chicago was home to one of the largest war plants in the country, used by Dodge-Chrysler to build bomber plane engines. After the war, Preston Tucker leased two of the buildings to build his “Torpedo” car. This site is now the home of the National Archives at Chicago! 

Read the full post on the AOTUS blog.

Image: Tucker “Torpedo” Patent Drawing, 06/14/1949. National Archives Identifier 594674

According to the Today show, this patent from our holdings has finally ended the age-long debate: over or under.

For some reason, the inventor seems to make a big fuss about the fact that he came up with the idea of inserting perforations into the roll. But for TP users more than a century later, the takeaway is this: The drawing Wheeler submitted with the patent application clearly shows how rolls should hang.

Once and for all, folks, it’s over.

4

Grafted Purple-Leafed Contorted Hazel

Rootstock: Turkish Tree Hazel (Corylus colurna)

Scion: ‘Red Majestic’ Hazel (Corylus avellana ‘Contorta’ x Corylus maxima 'Purpurea’)


According to the US patent on the scion (top) cultivar, it was developed in Germany in 1997. [x] I’m assuming it’s on a Turkish Hazel rootstock, because of the white bark and single leader form. 

This grafted tree was the last one at the local nursery, on clearance to make way for new stock, so I thought I would give it a try to replace a willow I dug out.

I would certainly like to try doing grafts of my own with materials from both scion and stock, but given that it is patented, there are unfortunately legal limits on how gardeners can innovate with, share, swap, and improve this cultivar.

The Science Behind Patent No. 8977583

Super small yet perfectly poised to outthink chip technology as we know it: Patent No. 8977583 is a highly efficient chip that’s not only built to resemble the brain, but to behave in ways like one too. It all happens through (wait for it) neuromorphic and synaptronic computation – in other words, the actions of a million artificial nerve cells. With this tiny chip, we’ll be able to cram more cognition and processing power into small devices like phones, hearing aids and watches to make them think better, faster and on-the-fly like humans.


See what else we’ve patented in our record 23rd year →

3

Today the Coca-Cola bottle is one of the most recognizable containers in the world, but a century ago nearly all soda bottles looked the same.

To distinguish its product from competitors, the Coca-Cola Company launched a competition in 1915 among glassmakers to design a new bottle that was unique in both look and feel.

The winning design, patented by the Root Glass Company of Terre Haute, had a fluted contour shape that was modeled after the cacao pod, the main ingredient in chocolate. However the original prototype was never manufactured because it was top-heavy and unstable.

The first commercial “Coke” bottles debuted with a wider base and slimmed-down, contoured shape. This silhouette became so unmistakable that in 1961 the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office gave it trademark status.

See the original patent in person at the National Archives in Washington, DC, from June 4 through July 29, 2015, in the West Rotunda Gallery; and from October 29 through December 2, 2015, in the East Rotunda Gallery.

Images: Original Coke Bottle Patent, November 16, 1915. (Records of the Patent and Trademark Office, National Archives)

Men of the 133rd Field Artillery Battalion enjoy Cokes on the front, March 17, 1944. (Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer, National Archives)

Military Police officers toast with their Coca-Colas at a “Retreat Club,” July 21, 1945. (Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer, National Archives)

3

Happy Inventors’ Day! Wait, the inventors have their own day? Of course they do! They take creative risks in the name of making life easier, so they’ve earned it. This day also marks the unofficial end to our celebration of 22 record breaking years. A reminder that although over six million patents exist, somehow there are always more to be conceived. So don’t just sit there, get on with it!