PRactically-Speaking

Do not underestimate the power of practicing your target language often. I learnt French as a young kid (before I was right), but stopped using it almost entirely in highschool, despite going to a french school haha, and as a result I have an accent now that I never had.
Please, please, please, practice, even if you’re at an advanced level. You can always forget a language.

Any Afrofuturists in the building? Anyone in the building wondering what Afrofuturism is?
On this week’s installment of Practically Speaking, we revisit Afrofuturism with artist and educator D. Denenge Akpem. Afrofuturism is a cultural movement that combines elements of science fiction, historical fiction, fantasy, and Afrocentricity, in order to critique present-day dilemmas of people of color. It also tries to remix and re-examine the historical events of the past.

We also hear from avant-garde musician and composer David Boykin about the new cultural movement.  

Plus, host Audra Wilson profiles visionary Science Fiction author Octavia Butler.

Tune in this Friday at 11am on http://vocalo.org 89.5fm (NWIndy) and 90.7fm (CHI).

UPDATE: You can hear the entire show here.

lance sending hunk lots of selfies along with awful pick up lines in spanish bc he thinks it’s a girl he just met’s number and hunk is like ‘sorry man, wrong number. you look nice though’ (in spanish, bc he probably knows like four different languages and doesn’t know if lance speaks english) but lance doesn’t believe him so hunk sends a pic of himself and lance is dying bc this guy is the cutest but hey is that the garrison uniform in the back of the pic? and turns out they’re both going so they end up talking for hours until they finally meet in person a couple days later

Three Pieces of Advice for Speaking Your Target Language In the Early Stages

This is 100% opinion from my personal experience, particularly intended for those who are nervous to start speaking in their target language. Different things work for different people, ecc. I’m just offering what I have learnt from what I have been through, ecc. you get the picture.

1. Start with a deep breath and simple greeting like “hello/good morning/afternoon/evening”. Kind of a no-brainer I guess, but it always puts me more at ease to start with hello and a smile whether I’m ordering a coffee at the bar, asking for advice/directions or meeting people.

2. Fillers are absolutely your best friend, learning them will buy you precious time to remember that word you’re searching for. For me, finding the equivalents of “ummm….”, “so…..”, “well…..”, “y’know….” and “like….” was a useful place to start.

3. Asking for help can seem like an intimidating prospect, however I’ve learnt that it’s nothing to be ashamed of. If you’re not sure of a phrase you’ve come across or you’re struggling to pronounce a particular word, I’ve found that the action itself of asking a native speaker (politely and in appropriate moment of course) reinforces the answer in my memory much more meaningfully than simply checking the dictionary - not to mention the added bonus of potentially making a new friend!

This has been a friendly reminder that You can do this!

When Nelson Mandela came to Chicago in the early 90s, he commented on how segregated the city is, and how it reminded him of apartheid South Africa.

On the next Practically Speaking, we explore how Chicago has come to be known as one of the most segregated cities in the U.S. We also take a look at the historical West Side vs. South Side divide among Blacks here.

Tune in Friday at 11am on www.vocalo.org | 90.7 (Chi) | 89.5 (NWI)

Srsly though, forgetting (vanilla) game mechanics for a second and assuming Fenris stopped by his own house before going to Hawke’s after the Hadriana fight…what would he wear?

How does crystal healing work?

Everything is a potential healer. In order to understand this, it is important to understand the basis of the natural holistic healing process. During healing practices, when we speak about the body, we are including those bodies which are not physically tangible(ie. the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual bodies)-we call these “subtle bodies” as a way to describe the experiences that surround our thoughts, feelings and emotions.

The body is a conglomeration of energy that appears in various patterns and densities. Despite human diversity, there are patterns which we all share. When your energy is aligned in certain patterns without being disrupted, you are experiencing good health(mentally/emotionally/physically). When we experience imbalances in these patterns, or a disruption, we start to experience poor health. This could be as simple as a headache, or as vital as a dangerous disease.

Anything with inherent harmony(aligned energy) can act as a tuning fork, which is why crystals help us so much- They have their own specific frequency. The frequencies and patterns which make up our world can be found in everything and everyone. This is why we are able to heal each other and use things that match those frequencies as a way to align our own energy. Anything(ie. a painting, a novel, music, dancing, etc.) can be used to aid the subtle bodies if we are able to recieve its harmony. In order to be positively affected by things of this nature, we must be open to them.

Crystals with a geometrical matrix can easily restore harmony, but all stones are capable of this. Energy establishes patterns when it occupies the form of subatomic particles- Minerals are a collection of these particles.

Nature has found these patterns through repetition. It rebuilds itself over and over again until it finds one which produces effective results, and it grows from that.

Each stone exists within a specific pattern or energetic alignment that can be found within us, like everything else. This explains why certain stones affect certain areas of the body- The frequency the stones occupy can find that frequency in our body, and if it is disrupted, can be tuned by the stone.

The intent of the user depends on the way the stone should be used. To benefit from the healing properties of certain stones, we may place them on the physical body near the area that needs alignment. Other stones, are intended to aid in peaceful dreaming. These should be placed beneath a pillow, or in a special “dream pouch”(filled with stones, herbs, mantras, personal mementos, etc.) Calming stones can be used as an aid during meditation by resting them on the physical body, or by holding them.

Stones can also be used to store memories and energy. In order to store energy or memories, we might verbally say or recall what we would like to be stored, or we might hold the stone and envision that which we intend. This is why stones used for healing need to be cleansed- They need to release excess energy and negativity, which collects when we use them for alignment. Stones hold the burden of our suffering and disease, which can weaken their healing potential when not relieved of such.

If you have any questions about crystals and their properties, feel free to ask. Happy healing, everyone. :)

speaking practically i think genji and hanzo are the same height as far as the models and shit are concerned (it’s just simpler that way i mean they even have the same fucking hero gallery poses) but i’ve had that general idea of genji wanting to be a bit taller and straight up asking mercy to make him just that bit taller

just because he fucking can

vimeo

This video features Denenge Akpem and her Performance Art piece, “8-8-8” (mentioned on last week’s Practically Speaking).

On last week’s Practically Speaking, Denenge Akpem helped us to unpack Afrofuturism. Afrofuturism is a cultural movement that combines elements of science fiction, historical fiction, fantasy, and Afrocentricity, in order to critique present-day dilemmas of people of color.  It also tries to remix and re-examine the historical events of the past.

We also heard from avant-garde musician and composer David Boykin. He expressed his opinions of the new cultural movement.

Plus, host Audra Wilson profiles visionary Science Fiction author Octavia Butler.


Practically Speaking airs fresh installments Fridays at 11am on http://vocalo.org 89.5fm (NWIndy) and 90.7fm (CHI).

anonymous asked:

Your blog is such a blessing & has been life-changing, thank you! Secondly, like many others in the lgbt+ & Christian community I deal with a lot of daily stress & worry, but on top of it all I have severe anxiety, depression, irritability & chronic fibromyalgia. Im painfully empathetic. I often have to emotionally and/or physically remove myself from troubles around me for myself to be happy, but is that selfish to do? It doesnt feel right to put myself before others but I get so overwhelmed.

You ask this at a good time, anon, because I just read a passage of a book for class that’s perfect for you (and all of us, really).

In Exploring Practices of Ministry by Pamela and Michael Cooper-White, the popular model of the Good Shepherd – the self-sacrificing Christian, who puts all their needs second to that of the flock – is placed aside in favor of the model of the Good Samaritan. I put the full quotation in its own post because it’s a great one, see it here. Below is a piece of the passage:

“The safety announcement on every airliner instructs passengers in case of an emergency to put on one’s own oxygen mask first, before assisting another person. If we exhaust ourselves in giving without taking time to replenish, if we burn out, we soon are no use to anyone. We are also not much use to ourselves; our relationships with others and ultimately even with God suffer.”

We should remember that the one Good Shepherd is Jesus – he alone serves and heals all people. We are more like the Good Samaritan, who helped someone he saw who was in desperate need but continued on his own journey as well – he did not help the wounded man alone, but rather got another person to help too so that he could keep on going on his own journey.

And just as we learn in the story of the Good Samaritan, there are two ways to be good neighbors and to follow Christ’s path: to serve, and to be served. When you need time for yourself, take that time. When you need help and support, reach out! See this post for more. 

Remember, Jesus tells us to love our neighbors as ourselves: if we are to serve and care for our neighbor, then it must mean Jesus expects us to serve and care for ourselves too, rather than suffering in self-denial and exhausting ourselves. We are not called to burn ourselves up in self-destroying acts – rather, take care of yourself, so that you live a full life dedicated to God. Small acts of service – even as small as smiling at someone as they walk by! – are as Christlike as large ones.

Peace be with you, anon, and keep yourself healthy and safe! <3

When Nelson Mandela came to Chicago in the early 90s, he commented on how segregated the city is, and how it reminded him of apartheid South Africa.

On this installment of Practically Speaking, we explore how Chicago has come to be known as one of the most segregated cities in the U.S. with Lincoln Quillian, assistant professor of sociology at Northwestern University.
We also take a look at the historical West Side vs. South Side divide among Blacks in Chicago. Host Audra Wilson talks to Henrietta Whitaker, who’s lived in Chicago for 40 years. She lives on the South Side, but worked for many years on the West Side.

External image
Photo by John H. White

Tune in to fresh installments Fridays and Saturdays at 11am (CST) on vocalo.org | 89.5FM (NWI) | 90.7FM (Chicago)

Mr. Loud’s first name is Lynn

THINK ABOUT IT: 

 It’s already been established that Mrs Loud’s first name is Rita 

 In “Overnight Success”, Lynn is addressed as Lynn Junior 

So if Mrs Loud’s first name isn’t Lynn, then Mr Loud’s first name must be Lynn 

because there’s literally no other reason for Lynn to have a “Junior” on the end of her name

On the next Practically Speaking, we explore the motivations of non-Blacks who have dedicated their academic studies to Black culture. We also break down the tendency to misappropriate what it means to be Native American, and explore the diversity within Native American culture.

Tune in Friday at 11am on www.vocalo.org | 90.7fm (Chi) | 89.5 (Nwi)

Venus and Serena Williams have dominated women’s tennis for the past decade with their extraordinary talent and unrelenting work ethnic. Although they represent a small number of Black tennis players at the elite level, tennis has long been a tradition within the Black community.

On this installment of Practically Speaking, we meet Gary Brewer, a Black tennis pro who faced heartbreaking obstacles to reach his goals. We also add a bit of flavor to the conversation with SharonMelissa Robinson a.k.a. Chef Fresh. She’s a crusader for food justice in the city of Chicago.

Check out fresh installments Fridays and Saturdays at 11am on www.vocalo.org or over the air on 90.7fm(Chi) and 89.5fm (NW Indy).

C.C. is a self-proclaimed “P.K.” (“preacher’s kid”), an academic, a writer and, in her own words, “a Black who happens to be lesbian.” She is founder of POW WOW, an organization that has provided resources to the Black LGBT community.
On this installment of Practically Speaking, C.C. talks about marriage equality, what it means to be “queer,” and why gay isn’t “the new Black.” Also, we explore anti-gay sentiment in the Caribbean with activist Maxim Thorne. He offers his own opinion on whether Gay is the New Black.
Plus, we talk to Cultural Anthropologist Clinton Nichols. He talks about the roles of Blacks in the early Gay Rights Movement, and the roles of Gays in the early Civil Rights Movement.

Tune in to fresh installments Fridays and Saturdays at 11am (CST) on vocalo.org | 89.5FM (NWI) | 90.7FM (Chicago)

On this installment of Practically Speaking, we explore the unique historical, political and social experiences of AfroLatin@s and people of African descent throughout the Americas.
Dr. Sherwin Bryant, professor of African American Studies and History at Northwestern University, gives us a history lesson. Later, Catalina Maria Johnson, Latin music journalist and host of Beat Latino on #vocalo, shares how music is a significant marker of the African presence throughout Latin America.

Tune in Fridays at 11am and Saturdays at 11am to fresh episodes of Practically Speaking on vocalo.org/player | 90.7fm (CHI) | 89.5fm (INDY)