PREHISPANIC

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El texto sigue en Español depues del Ingles

Quetzalcoátl plays the conch trumpet in the four corners of the underworld. In this painting from the Quetzalcoátl cycle, The Plumed Serpent has already descended to the underworld to ask for the bones of the ancestors in the keeping of the Lord of Death to create the new race of men for this, the Fifth Universe. However, Mictlantecuhtli, the Teótl of Death, agrees to give up the bones only on the condition that Quetzalcoátl play a conch trumpet at the four corners of Mictlán. This is a trick, however, for the trumpet has no holes, and can therefore make no sound. Xolotl, the Spirit Animal of Quetzalcoátl, tells him to summon the wasps and worms to enter the shell; the worms dig holes and the wasps beat their wings, causing the trumpet to reverberate. Thereupon Quetzalcoátl and his Nagual traverse the four corners of the underworld, playing the trumpet, and causing all Mictlán to ring with its thunder. You can find this and other paintings from my book as prints in my Etsy store, at this link. https://www.etsy.com/shop/MexicaHeart

Quetzalcoátl toca la trompeta de caracol en los cuatro rincones del inframundo. En esta pintura del ciclo de Quetzalcoatl, la Serpiente Emplumada ya ha descendido al inframundo para pedir los huesos de los ancestres en el cuidado del Señor de la Muerte para crear la nueva raza de hombres para esto, la Quinta Universo. Sin embargo, Mictlantecuhtli, el Téotl de la Muerte, se compromete a renunciar a los huesos sólo a condición de que Quetzalcóatl juega una trompeta de caracol en las cuatro esquinas de Mictlán. Este es un truco, sin embargo, porque la trompeta no tiene agujeros, y por lo tanto no puede hacer ningún sonido. Xólotl, el Animal Espíritu de Quetzalcoatl, le dice que se convocará a las avispas y gusanos para entrar en la concha; los gusanos cavan agujeros y las avispas baten sus alas, haciendo que la trompeta reverbera. Entonces Quetzalcóatl y su Nagual atraviesan las cuatro esquinas del mundo subterráneo, tocando la trompeta, y causando todo Mictlán a sonar con su trueno.

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Chaac in Mayapán, México

Chaac is the supernatural representation of rain in the mayan worldview and their figureheads constitute much of art in the architecture of mayan people. Offerings to Chaac can mean the desire to have rain throughout the year, in an area where it is very important for crops.

Chaac, la representación de la lluvia, forma parte importante en la cosmovisión maya y sus mascarones lo hacen también en la arquitectura prehispánica. Por supuesto, ofrendarlo era algo común en una zona donde se necesitan las lluvias para el cultivo.

1200 d.C. - 1450 d.C 

“Teocalli Mexicana.”

   
This is an image inspired by the Teocalli, the throne of Moctecuzoma, carved in stone and today housed in the Anthropologymuseum of Mexico City. At the center appears an eagle seated upon a cactus, the sacred symbol of Tenochtitlan, capital of the Mexica empire. The cactus emerges from the heart of Copil, an ancient magician, which itself is within the body of the earth. This is an image of modern Mexico; as such, this is an image of the modern state, for the eagle on the cactus is today depicted on the flag of Mexico. Thus, below appear the members of the modern state; men and women who are Native American, white, and black, all of whom bend over and sustain the state upon their backs. 

Yaotécpatl.
(1404-1437)

Yaotécpatl was one of the most experienced warriors of the Mexica Empire in its heyday, and he was a powerful nahual.

He gain the range of tzitzimitl warrior with only 23 years old and participated in numerous campaigns of conquest taking numerous prisoners.

However, his greatest achievement was the single combat that he took against the  tzitzimime released by owl nahuals who used  powerful spells of necromancy.

 He could kill the terrible monster, which wreaked havoc on the population of Chapultepec, but he  had to sacrifice his life.