Original-Set

anonymous asked:

I can understand having a small main cast for the games; but the same doesn't really work for comics. (Unless it's something daily like Garfield) You have to have a pretty big cast in order to churn out story-driven content without it being noticeably redundant in nature. (The Sonic game series has expanded so much at this point, I don't see why they wouldn't start off a bit small while slowing adding and putting things into place before having original content sets off)

Exactly, and since the comics come out every month, you need to rotate that gigantic cast in and out on a consistent basis so that,like you said, it doesn’t get too redundant. Sonic does kind of have the cast for that, but there is another problem: Sega doesn’t let the characters develop

Now, I get why they’re like this. I understand not wanting to let the characters stray too far from the source material, I get that. It’s just that even with a decent sized cast, if none of the them can grow or develop or even learn from their experiences, things will get stale really fast.  Mega Man managed to get away with having less original characters than the Sonic comics because characters like Rock and Blues were allowed to go through character arcs. In fact, all the Robot master were given a surprising amount of leeway in how they were able to develop. Now of course OCs were added, but notice how there weren’t as many. The only OCs were really got were a doctor, her robot, and a new group of villains, and that’s because classic Mega Man really only has a handful of villains to choose from, even including spin off stuff (In fact the only 2 other legitimate villain come from other material)

Anyways, point is, in order for things to not get stale, even if you ignore continuity, you need to either let the cast develop, or have original characters. 

So About That Whole Thing

LONG COMIC BOOK RANT INCOMING:

Okay some things need to be said:

1. If you’re going to write a smug thunk-piece about the “failure” of “diversity” in comics, maybe don’t use the cover image of a book that’s had 4 collections on the NYT graphic books bestseller list, won a Hugo and cleaned up at Angouleme. Just because you HOPE it’s on the chopping block, oh Riders of the Brohirrim, doesn’t mean it is.

2. I will tell you exactly why Ms Marvel works: it didn’t set out to be Ms Marvel. We were originally going to pitch it as a 10 issue limited series. I had a 3 issue exit strategy because I assumed we were going to get canned. There was no “diversity initiative” anywhere–getting that thing made at all was a struggle. It was a given that any character without AT LEAST a 20-year history would tank. Everybody, myself included, assumed this series was going to work out the same way.

3. That freed us–by “us” I mean the whole creative team–to tell exactly the story we wanted to tell. We had nothing to lose, nothing to overcome but low expectations. That gave us room to break a lot of rules.

STUFF THAT IS DIFFICULT TO REPLICATE AND IMPOSSIBLE TO PLAN:

1. Unexpected audiences. We are at a point in history when the role of religion is at a tremendous inflection point. What I didn’t realize was that the anxieties felt by young Muslims are also felt by young Mormons, evangelicals, orthodox Jews, and others. A h-u-g-e reason Ms Marvel has struck the chord it has is because it deals with the role of traditionalist faith in the context of social justice, and there was–apparently–an untapped audience of people from a wide variety of faith backgrounds who were eager for a story like this. Nobody could have predicted or planned for that. That’s being in the right place at the right time with the right story burning a hole in your pocket. Plenty of other stuff I’ve written and liked has fallen with a huge thud. That’s the norm. Exceptions are great when they happen, but hard to plan.

2. The paradox of low expectations. The bar was set pretty low for Ms Marvel, but because of Ms Marvel’s success, that bar got set much higher for similar books that came later.

STUFF THAT IS ENTIRELY AVOIDABLE:

1. This is a personal opinion, but IMO launching a legacy character by killing off or humiliating the original character sets the legacy character up for failure. Who wants a legacy if the legacy is shitty?

2. Diversity as a form of performative guilt doesn’t work. Let’s scrap the word diversity entirely and replace it with authenticity and realism. This is not a new world. This is *the world.*

3. Never try to be the next whoever. Be the first and only you. People smell BS a mile away.

4. The direct market and the book market have diverged. Never the twain shall meet. We need to accept this and move on, and market accordingly.

5. Not for nothing, but there is a direct correlation between the quote unquote “diverse” Big 2 properties that have done well (Luke Cage, Black Panther, Ms Marvel, Batgirl) and properties that have A STRONG SENSE OF PLACE. It’s not “diversity” that draws those elusive untapped audiences, it’s *particularity.* This is a vital distinction nobody seems to make. This goes back to authenticity and realism.

AND FINALLY

On a practical level, this is not really a story about “diversity” at all. It’s a story about the rise of YA comics. If you look at it that way, the things that sell and don’t sell (AND THE MARKETS THEY SELL IN VS THE MARKETS THEY DON’T SELL IN) start to make a different kind of sense.

LEARN SPANISH WATCHING TV SERIES (FROM SPAIN)

As you all may know, watching TV in your target language helps improving the vocabulary, listening comprehension, and knowledge of it in general. This is why I decided to create a masterpost with some of the most well-known TV series in Spain. The titles are clickable, and they redirect to a trailer or some short clip of the show. 

(Not following any particular order)

  • Las chicas del cable: Netflix’s first Spanish original series. It’s set in 1928, and it tells the story of a group of girls working for a telecommunications company. It has this Great Gastby feeling, highly recommended! 
  • Física o química: I’d say this is a low-budget, Spanish version of Skam or Skins, but a bit outdated since it’s from some years ago. But basically same story, the struggles of some high school kids.
  • Cuéntame cómo pasó: it narrates the daily life of a Spanish family of the second half of the twentieth century, so of course it has some historic episodes going on. It started back in 2001, based in 1968, and it’s still on air, narrating the year 1986.
  • Aquí no hay quién viva: sitcom which depicts the problems of the neighbours of an apartment building. It stopped being broadcast in 2006, but a new series with basically the same argument and actors emerged, called La que se avecina.
  • Los hombres de Paco: drama comedy which tells the story of some policemen.
  • Farmacia de guardia: apparently this is the most watched Spanish TV series ever. It’s a sitcom about a pharmaceutic and her life.
  • Los Serrano: drama comedy about a family and their struggles.
  • Vis a vis: a Spanish remake of Orange is the new black, basically.
  • El ministerio del tiempo: fantasy TV series about a ministry that travels in time.
  • Velvet: story of love between a heir and a seamstress in the 50s. Miguel Ángel Silvestre (who also appears on Sense8) plays the lead role here.
  • Sin tetas no hay paraíso: a love story between a posh girl and a troubled guy. Miguel Ángel Silvestre also plays a role here.
  • El príncipe: drama series of a relationship between a Christian policeman and a Muslim woman.
  • Aída: sitcom about a poor-ish, low class family and their neighbours.
  • Águila roja: about a masked hero, set during the 17th century.
  • La señora: set in the 20s, about a love story between people of two different social classes.
  • Amar en tiempos revueltos: soap opera depicting the life in the Spanish civil war.
  • Gran hotel: drama series set in 1905 about a family who own a hotel.
  • El internado: thriller which focuses on the lives of students living in a boarding room.
  • Médico de familia: a bit old, tells the story of a doctor and his family.
  • Hospital central: drama about the lives of some hospital workers.
  • Verano azul: from 1989, one of the most iconic Spanish TV series. It tells the story of some children and their summer vacation.

If you want to watch any of them and aren’t able to find them (or if you have any doubts), drop me a message and I’ll be glad to help. Happy learning!


Learn Spanish watching TV channels online

Learn Spanish listening to radio stations online

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#is this not love tho?
#are these not similar situations? #broadly speaking that is

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In the early hours of July 17th 1918 a family and four faithful servants waited in a dim-lit cellar in a house called “The house of special purpose”. There they were told that they had to pose for a family photo to prove they were still alive .  This family was no other than the family who once ruled Russia. The father was the ex-tsar of Russia, who was a weak ruler but he was a gentle and kind man who loved his family. The mother was descended from Queen Victoria’s bloodline who had a tough childhood after the lost of her mother and baby sister at a young age. Which shaped her into a shy woman. They had five children who were definition of innocence itself. The four beautiful daughters : One was intelligent, one was dutiful, one was brave and one was able to make all frowns turn into a smile. The youngest of the five was the delicate little boy who was originally set to rule Russia someday but that never came to be. And finally the four servants who stuck with them through thick and thin. After waiting, guards started to fill the room and there was no photo to be taken but instead a death sentence was read out. In the blink of an eye bullets ricocheted off the walls and the echo of screams filled the room. After the gunfire, the children and some of the servants were still alive so they were brutally shot/bayoneted to death. In total it took 20-30 minutes to kill all 11 people in that cellar. 

This happened 99 years ago today, may they all rest in peace.

I see a few people mad that Doomfist is a villainous big black man, but as a black male, a nerd and an actor, I appreciate it. Not everyday that black people get a smart black character that isn’t a gun-smuggling, drug-running, convenience-store-robbing thug. Also, as an actor, it gives me a beloved character to point at and say “See? Black men can be seen as a villain with a complicated sense of morality too. Give us a chance.”

You think the stereotypical roles like thug, comic relief, civil rights activist, slave, and tough cop/soldier with a heart of gold plus the occasional “Nice, positive and sometimes gay black friend” roles are all that black people want to represented as? You think nerds see themselves in any of that? You think all black actors want to play such a narrow pool of roles? To hell with that, let me play a brilliant, legally rich bad guy that kicks everyone’s ass with decades of martial arts training while aiding an organization attempting to help humanity evolve. As things are now, I’ll never get a role of a misguided mastermind like Lex Luthor or Vandal Savage, or as a murder machine with a complicated relationship with the world around him like Joker or Carnage. Overwatch is showing the world that terrorists and thugs aren’t the only bad guys minorities can play.

Doomfist is not an African terrorist or warlord like that guy in Fast and Furious 7 or a tough lackey that the hero beats up before the villain shows up. He isn’t a drug dealer like Denzel in Training Day and he is isn’t a common criminal like T.I. in Ant Man. He is a super-villain of the Vandal Savage variety and that’s more than almost any similar black character or actor ever gets offered. I’m sure that actor is happy to be the Darth Vader of the franchise. He’s up in the ranks with characters like Black Manta as minority super villains who are THE biggest bad guy of their respective franchises while avoiding falling into a stereotype. He gives variety to black characters. You could literally take the same origin, set it in Europe, change his name and his skin color, and he’d still be the same intriguing character instead of a character made specifically for black people. He is simply a good, threatening villain that happens to have dark skin.

Plus it fits the international feel of Overwatch and its enemy, Talon. This game is one of the few franchises that seem capable of acknowledging that worldwide organizations in the future wouldn’t be 90% white guys. Overwatch and Talon, as organizations, literally pull people from ALL OVER the world based on skill and ideology, and the cast looks like it. Of course, in this situation you’d have an African, a European, a Central American and a North American. All from different areas on the globe. You won’t see me attacking Star Trek for using this same reasoning for why the main cast of each show/movie isn’t 90% white. It only makes sense that this applies to the bad guys as well.

When less than half of the people on earth are white in 2017, what are the odds that in 2077 worldwide organizations would have a majority of white agents.

Rant over, I guess…

Man spends five months on Rikers Island without knowing his bail was $2

  • Aitabdel Salem, 42, spent five months at Rikers Island before being informed that his bail was only $2 and he could have left as early as four months prior, the New York Daily News reported. 
  • Now he is filing a lawsuit against both the city and his Legal Aid lawyers.
  • On Nov. 21, 2014, police arrested Salem for allegedly attacking an officer who said he was stealing a coat. 
  • He was also placed under arrest for prior tampering and mischief charges. The judge originally set his bail for both cases at $25,000 but dropped the initial case to a dollar on Nov. 26, his court date. 
  • The judge also ordered him to be set free on Nov. 28. His legal aids, however, failed to produce him in court leaving Salem unaware of the change. Read more (6/28/17)

follow @the-movemnt

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a bit late… (・・;)ゞ  Happy Birthday Yohane Yoshiko-chan! [LLSHP AU]

Why the Linda Cho Snub Stings

And here we go, folks: as promised, my first in a series of critical posts regarding Broadway, culture, and my opinion on the state of theatre today.

Let me preface this post with a clear disclaimer: I am a major fan of Anastasia and have been since the Don Bluth movie came out in 1997. I also understand why Santo Loquasto was selected by the American Theatre Wing as this year’s Tony winner for costume design; I congratulate him heartily, because he is a master of the craft.

But with that out of the way, I disagree with the American Theatre Wing on this award and truly believe that the award should have gone to Linda Cho for her work on Anastasia. I think this honestly was the most upsetting snub for me last night. In some ways, this gets to the heart of another post I made. From an aesthetic standpoint, Linda Cho’s costumes were more visually impressive, more memorable, and more original than those for Hello, Dolly! I’m not alleging any animus in the ATW’s decision, to be clear; it goes more to the somewhat staid, static vision of theatre possessed by the eligible voters.

Now, part of the reason I find the HD costumes uninspiring is because thanks to HD being a revival, there is a kind of need to look to the past productions for inspiration, since the director and producers were not trying to go for some kind of completely original setting (which is fine, for the record!). 

But to my mind, the Best Costume Design category is designed to reward originality and accomplishment, not just improvements on a theme. The costumes that Linda Cho designed for Anastasia manage to have a kind of timeless elegance that grabs the eye and forces you to notice not only the actors, but the costumes themselves. 

Anya’s (Christy Altomare) red and blue gowns from Act II have stuck in my head since the very first stills were released to Playbill ages and ages ago. For visual pops, you cannot beat these (all photos are either from Playbill or other publicly available sources, and are not my property):

Both of these gowns exude a classic elegance that is unrivaled on Broadway today, paying homage to the source material (the high society of the Roaring 20s in Paris, as well as the Russian designs included on the red gown) while still looking fresh. 

The lines on the blue gown in particular are exquisite, and give Christy Altomare (who is not a tall woman) the appearance of added height without it being obvious that is what it’s designed to do.

The costumes for the Romanovs are also elegant, sophisticated, and memorable (I lack a proper still for this that I can attribute to Playbill or Broadway World or Broadway Box and thus the still is drawn from Pinterest; if you are the original photographer, please message me and I will edit this post to credit you). 

For those familiar with the show, you know the ones I mean: the ghostly pearlescent white of Nicholas, Alexandra, and the others slain at the start of the musical. The costumes are graceful, and a good match to many images of the real Romanovs in the era in which the prologue is set. But as with Anya’s gowns…truly, there is a level beyond the simple. I called them “ghostly” for a reason: you can’t look at them without having a terrible sense that these people (innocent for the purposes of the musical) are about to be slain. Linda Cho made funeral shrouds out of ballgowns–and that is a metaphor that works on a huge number of levels.

But you know where Linda Cho really gets me? The costumes for Lily (Caroline O’Connor), Vlad (John Bolton), and Dimitry (Derek Klena). Let’s take each in turn, with just one example per.

This is a Playbill still from the Broadway performance of (I believe) either “Land of Yesterday” or “The Countess and the Common Man”. One of my fellow fanastasias ( @nikolaevna-romanova​ or @anyasdimitry​ perhaps?) can confirm which scene/number.

I’ll focus on Lily for the moment. That gold dress is clearly designed to pop. Lily is a fun, flirty, outrageous character, like her spiritual predecessor in the 1997 film as voiced by the divine Bernadette Peters. Caroline O’Connor brings a downright saucy quality to the character that this gown is designed to highlight. The character is a fallen aristocrat who acts as press secretary/majordomo to the Dowager Empress. She’s supposed to look wealthy–but a kind of shabby wealthy, like someone down on their luck. 

So let’s take a closer look at this Linda Cho masterpiece (via Broadway Box):

The pattern and the cut of the dress are simple–much simpler than would have been worn by the nouveaux-riches of post-war Paris, but still quite elegant and stylish, especially when accented with the lace gloves. But it’s a far cry from the style that Countess Malevsky-Malevitch would have been used to in her old life in imperial St. Petersburg. She’s had to make reductions–but damn if she’s not going to make them work. Linda Cho really captures that perfectly. This dress looks, in addition to being beautiful, like it might have come from a very high end store, but wasn’t custom-made as would have been expected of someone with massive resources. While presenting a memorable dress, Linda Cho stuck to the history: Lily is down on her old circumstances (as the Romanov family was post-Revolution) but she will still Look The Part.

Next, I look at how Linda Cho costumed Vlad Popov, the would-be Count and titular Common Man of the previous number. This still is courtesy of Getty.fr and numerous other news orgs, and is from the Broadway opening night:

It looks pretty fancy, right? It is! But if you look at it closely and in the context of the play, it’s in the same category as Lily’s gold dress. The fabrics are clearly fine, but it’s not a custom tailoring, even though this comes after he is restored to some measure of glory. Linda Cho replicates a rich French brocade for the vest and matches it to the morning coat perfectly (more technically, I believe it’s a stroller, though the term is anachronistic for the year the musical is set). But there’s a reminder to the common-man status in the design of the trousers: leaving them striped, subtly, the way Linda Cho did is a subtle signal that Vlad is not born to wealth–no aristocrat would have styled themselves that way. But he mixes the two styles in a subtle nod to what he is (a commoner) and what he pretends to be (a Count).

Finally, there’s the costuming for Dimitry. Playbill ran this still before opening night, and it’s a perfect one to showcase why Linda Cho was such a genius with her choices:

We know from the musical that Dima is a poor con artist, really not much more than a gutter rat as it were and his costuming matches. The fabrics he wears are rough-hewn and cheap-looking (by intention) because he would never have been able to afford anything else unless he aggressively bartered. As a good man in early Communist Russia, he wouldn’t have had the resources to style himself any better–we get the sense Vlad can only because he had the clothes beforehand. Dimitry is all commoner, all working class, all rough (the same with Anya’s Act I wardrobe).

Now, it’s easy to make a costume look cheap–but Linda Cho does more than that. She makes it look cared for. After all, Dimitry has no resources to replace a winter coat if it’s torn, and so we see that while worn, it’s clearly cared for. His shoulder bag, if a bit out of place in the era, is the same: the leather is time-worn and it’s clearly a possession he has had most of his life. That’s not an easy look to master, and to execute it so flawlessly requires real skill.

Here’s my bottom line. The costumes that Linda Cho designed were bold and innovative, and perfectly matched to the heart and soul of the characters who wore them. They took some risks in the way in which they used colors and fabrics, and they blended some modern sensibilities with the design elements and fabrics of the era the musical is set in. That is the kind of thinking that I feel the American Theatre Wing had a chance to reward with the Tony in 2017, and it’s why I feel disappointed by the snubbing of Linda Cho. Her costumes weren’t groundbreaking, but they were unique, they were original, and above all, they felt like they improved the overall quality of the show for their presence.

I doubt Linda Cho will ever read this, but if she does: you own the Tony in my mind, and I cannot wait to see what you come up with for the next show lucky enough to hire you to design their costumes.

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Thank you to the amazing @lavenderrpurr, who shared with me her gorgeous reshade settings, which i never could get to work properly myself!! If you guys ever need any help with reshade (or editing in general tbh), shoot her an ask/message!! It’s definitely a huuuuge time saver for quick edits :’) 

so here are some shots I took of the beans to test it out!! I’m totally in love with it….

Ft. @paissa-brat