Open Technology Institute

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The Radical New Institution to Liberate U.S. Data

“Open data”—the push to make public information available to, and usable by, the public—has found many friends in the past few years. In May, President Obama ordered most government data open, announcing “open and machine-readable” would be “the new default for government information.” Companies now build themselves around public data, and some cities, too, regularly publish their statistics.

But progress remains piecemeal—not all governments publish their data in a usable format, or at all—and open data’s success  depends on implementation. 

Now the cause is getting an expert advocacy organization. The Knight Foundation announced late Monday that it will create an Open Data Institute in the U.S. with an initial grant of $250,000. If successful, the organization could bring about the popular use of government data.

Thirteen national Open Data Institutes came into being yesterday, in fact.

Read more. [Image: NASA]

MIT publishes virtually ALL of its course materials online for free. You can take hundreds of college courses completely free, in your own time.

It is called OpenCourseWare and you can register for free and take online courses. There are online students from around the world.

MIT “OpenCourseWare makes the materials used in the teaching of almost all of MIT’s subjects available on the Web, free of charge. With more than 2,000 courses available, OCW is delivering on the promise of open sharing of knowledge”

see

http://ocw.mit.edu/index.htm

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ONLINE COURSES » MIT Open CourseWare

Course materials for many of the classes available at MIT- lecture notes, some audio/video lectures, etc.- shared for free by the university itself. (submitter evalilith)

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology has made over 2,000 courses available online for free, from biology (shown above) to graphic design.  A complete listing can be found here.  In addition to being available at the MIT website, course materials—including audio and video lectures and course notes—can be downloaded from iTunes U.  Users also have the chance to discuss topics with other students and get help from mentors in online study groups.

Sprint Stands Up for Net Neutrality

Net Neutrality is arguably one of the most important and pressing technological issues facing society, especially in light of how much control large corporations already have over media, information, and communication. Now, telecommunications giant Sprint has come out in support of the movement. More…

http://matterist.com/sprint-stands-net-neutrality/
A new article has been published on www.brianbrown.net

New Post has been published on http://www.brianbrown.net/2014/11/05/san-francisco-has-slower-internet-that-any-other-major-city-in-the-us/

San Francisco Has Slower Internet That Any Other Major City In The US

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You would think that San Francisco, with its close proximity to tech-centric Silicon Valley, would have some of the fastest internet in the world. 
According to a new report from the Open Technology Institute, that just isn’t the case.
Researchers at the institute analyzed internet speeds in 24 cities in North America, Asia, and Europe.
Surprisingly, San Francisco ranked near the bottom in terms of download speed, beating only Mexico City, Berlin, Dublin, and London. 
Open Technology Institute
It seems that San Francisco was a bit of an anomaly in OTI’s analysis. As Curbed points out, the fastest internet costs less in San Francisco than in other US cities. A download speed of 200 megabits per second (mbps) can be purchased for $30 per month, while that same speed costs about $300 a month in New York and Los Angeles. 
OTI writes in the connectivity report: “During our regression analysis, every city except San Francisco, CA suggested that as a customer pays more, she receives a higher speed. But in San Francisco, CA, we found the relationship between speed and price is negative, due to some very cheap, fast plans that break from the city’s pricing trend.”
Here are the cities with the fastest Internet speeds, compared to average monthly prices. San Franciscans may have some of the slowest Internet connections, but users pay around the same as people living with the fastest connections in Seoul, Hong Kong, and Tokyo. 
Open Technology Institute

SEE ALSO: 
I Took An Online Coding Class, And Now I Have A Huge Appreciation For What Programmers Do All Day


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Meh… Cyber bill’s privacy safeguards don’t impress critics

“Some of the changes are significant and go some distance toward responding to the concerns we and other have raised,” Greg Nojeim, a senior counsel at the Center for Democracy & Technology in Washington, DC, told the Hill this week. “However, at the end of the day, the bill still authorizes companies in the private sector to share information about their users’ communications directly with the NSA.”

“This is still a fundamentally flawed bill,” Drew Mitnick, a policy counsel at DC-based digital rights organization Access Now, added to the Hill. Robyn Greene, a policy attorney for New America Foundation’s Open Technology Institute, said her biggest take-away from reading the proposal “was how disappointed I was at the amendments.”

On Tuesday the bill’s authors released the full, updated text of the CISA legislation passed last week, and critics say the changes have done little to assuage their fears about wanton sharing of Americans’ private data. In fact, legal analysts say the changes actually widen the backdoor leading from private firms to intelligence agencies. “It’s a complete failure to strengthen the privacy protections of the bill,” says Robyn Greene, a policy lawyer for the Open Technology Institute, which joined a coalition of dozens of non-profits and cybersecurity experts criticizing the bill in an open letter earlier this month. “None of the [privacy-related] points we raised in our coalition letter to the committee was effectively addressed.”

I keep hearing older people saying that Generation Y, the millennials, don’t stand a chance, and I always disagreed. But when I think about the reality of the situation, and I look at facts, and I read surveys, I start to think that it’s possible and quite likely that they are correct. However, I don’t think that it is at all our fault. We were raised being given trophies for participation and told that we’re “unique” and “special”, and while I do think to some degree that we all have unique traits and strengths, I feel like the world we were raised in is completely different from the world that we’re living in now as adults. The economy h become global and the job market has become globally competitive. So we’ve been raised to think of ourselves as participants rather than competitors, which make finding good, lasting jobs in a globally competitive workplace very difficult for us as a generation. We’ve lived in the shadow of 2 major wars, witnessed the failure of 3 major institutions (banking, education, and political), and lived in a time of severe economic crisis. Government regulations have cause teachers to teach for exams rather than provide us with critical thinking and problem solving skills that are crucial in the workplace. The age of artificial intelligence make it near impossible for college graduates to find jobs in the fields that they’ve studied, so we have a huge number of college graduated who are over educated, underemployed, and underpaid with massive amounts of student loan debt that they have no way out of. Older generations have failed to create policies, failed to initiate entitlement reform, and are shifting all of those burdens to our generation.
So in part, I agree. Our generation really doesn’t stand a chance. But IT IS NOT OUR FAULT. We’ve been dealt a shit hand. But by some miracle, we, as a generation, have remained optimistic for the future. And I think that speaks volumes about our resilience.

Congress is moving forward quickly with legislation that would encourage private companies to share cyberthreat information with government agencies, despite concerns that two leading bills weaken consumer privacy protections.

The House Intelligence Committee voted Thursday to approve the Protecting Cyber Networks Act (PCNA), just two days after the bill was introduced.

The House bill “is a cybersurveillance bill at least as much as it is a cybersecurity bill, and it is written so broadly that it could wind up making the Internet less safe,” Robyn Greene, policy counsel at the New America Foundation’s Open Technology Institute, said by email.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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The U.S. Congress is moving forward quickly with legislation that would encourage private companies to share cyberthreat information with government agencies, despite concerns that two leading bills weaken consumer privacy protections.

The House of Representatives Intelligence Committee voted Thursday to approve the Protecting Cyber Networks Act (PCNA), just two days after the bill was introduced.

[ Deep Dive: How to rethink security for the new world of IT. | Discover how to secure your systems with InfoWorld’s Security newsletter. ]

The House bill “is a cybersurveillance bill at least as much as it is a cybersecurity bill, and it is written so broadly that it could wind up making the Internet less safe,” Robyn Greene, policy counsel at the New America Foundation’s Open Technology Institute [OTI], said by email.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here



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