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Ernie Pyle (8/3/1900 - 4/18/1945)

Famed columnist and war correspondent Ernie Pyle was killed on April 18, 1945, while covering the Battle of Okinawa.  He can be seen spending time with members of the invasion force on board ship prior to the invasion of Okinawa, in this Universal Newsreel from April 9, 1945, filmed only weeks before his death.

The brief clip featuring Pyle begins at roughly 0:40 in the video below:

US Marine Corps Brigadier General Timothy Donovan, lays a wreath on the foot of the Ernie Pyle Monument. The monument, in Ie Sihma, Japan, Marks the spot where the famous journalist lost his life to a Japanese sniper, during World War II. The Monument was rededicated on July 22, 2000, to commemorate  Ernie Pyle’s 100th birthday, 7/25/2000

“A formidable task force carves out a beachhead, about 350 miles from the Japanese mainland. Landing craft of all kinds blacken the sea out to the horizon, where stand the battlewagons, cruisers and destroyers.” Okinawa, April 13, 1945.

From the series: Activities, Facilities, and Personalities, 1886 - 1967. Records of the U.S. Coast Guard.

U.S. forces invaded Okinawa on April 1, 1945, during one of the last campaigns of World War II.  The Battle of Okinawa lasted from early April until mid-June 1945 as the Allies sought to gain the island for use as a strategic air base against mainland Japan. The battle was one of the bloodiest in the Pacific, and over 77,000 Japanese soldiers were killed or committed suicide, while the Allies suffered over 14,000 deaths.  Additionally the local population suffered significant casualties, and an estimated 42,000–150,000 local civilians were killed or committed suicide.

via the National Archives at Boston on Facebook

Tank-borne infantry moving up to take the town of Ghuta before the Japanese can occupy it. The men are members of the 29th Marines. Okinawa, April 1, 1945.

From the series: General Photograph File of the U.S. Marine Corps, 1927 - 1981

U.S. forces invaded Okinawa on April 1, 1945, during one of the last campaigns of World War II.  The Battle of Okinawa lasted from early April until mid-June 1945 as the Allies sought to gain the island for use as a strategic air base against mainland Japan. The battle was one of the bloodiest in the Pacific, and over 77,000 Japanese soldiers were killed or committed suicide, while the Allies suffered over 14,000 deaths.  Additionally the local population suffered significant casualties, and an estimated 42,000–150,000 local civilians were killed or committed suicide.

via the National Archives at Boston on Facebook