Norman Dike

  • Looks like a cinnamon roll and is actually a cinnamon roll: Buck Compton, Harry Welsh, George Luz, Don Malarkey, Eugene Roe, David Webster, Shifty Powers
  • Looks like a cinnamon roll but could actually kill you: Dick Winters, Lewis Nixon (sinnamon roll tbh), Bull Randleman
  • Looks like they could kill you but is actually a cinnamon roll: Carwood Lipton, Frank Perconte, Babe Heffron
  • Looks like they could kill you and could actually kill you: Ronald Spiers, Bill Guarnere, Joe Toye, John Martin, Joe Liebgott
  • Useless bagel: Norman Dike
  • Dike: Christmas is cancelled.
  • Buck: You can’t cancel a holiday.
  • Dike: Keep it up, Lieutenant, and you’ll lose New Years.
  • Buck: And what does that mean?
  • Dike: Sergeant Lipton, take New Years away from Lieutenant Compton.
  • Lipton: *looks into the camera like he’s on the office*

anonymous asked:

easy company & their biggest turn off in people? you know like: using "literally" when they mean "figuratively", too touchy feely/no respect for personal space, interrupting someone else talking..

  • dick winters - when you go against his direct orders.
  • lewis nixon - when you drink his VAT69 w/o asking him first and/or when you pet his dog before asking his permission.
  • ron speirs - weak-willed people.
  • carwood lipton - norman dike.
  • buck compton - not being able to be best friend with everyone.
  • frank perconte - spaghetti cooked in ketchup.
  • johnny martin - everything and every one annoys him.
  • david webster - false facts about sharks.
  • joseph liebgott - when someone says bad things about being Jewish.
  • babe heffron - being blindly robbed by his supposedly best friends, buck how could you do this???
  • george luz - grumpy people who doesn’t know how to have fun and also norman dike.
  • joe toye - last minute packing that ends up w/ him carrying all of the stuff that weighs as much as he is.
  • doc roe - someone taking his scissors and hoarding all the morphine.
  • don malarkey - sobel calling him “bullshit” bc it makes him wanna FITE.
  • bill guarnere - dick giving him direct orders when he’s pissed off about something.
  • shifty powers - someone saying he’s a good shooter bc he’s not okay? now dad, he’s a sharp shooter.
  • pat christenson - when someone asks him to draw something when he’s not in the mood.
  • skinny sisk - having to be chaperone for lieb and web oh my god.
Band of Brothers: Zodiac
  • Aries: Robert Sink, Walter Gordon, John D. Hall
  • Taurus: Joseph Liebgott, Alton More, John Martin, Edward Heffron, William Guarnere, Ronald Speirs, Earl McClung, Norman Dike
  • Gemini: George Luz, David Kenyon Webster, Roy Cobb
  • Cancer: Roderick Strohl, Robert Wynn, James Alley, Donald Hoobler, Albert Blithe, Thomas Meehan, William Evans, Francis J. Mellet
  • Leo: Donald Malarkey, Edward Tipper, Jack E. Foley
  • Virgo: Floyd Talbert, Burton Christenson, William Dukeman,
  • Libra: Lewis Nixon, Eugene Roe, Harry Welsh
  • Scorpio: Denver Randleman, Robert Van Klinken
  • Sagittarius: -
  • Capricorn: Lynn Compton
  • Aquarius: Richard Winters, Carwood Lipton, Warren Muck, Herbert Sobel
  • Pisces: Darrell Powers, Wayne Sisk, Frank Perconte, Joe Toye, Robert L. Strayer, Lester A. Hashey, James L. Diel
2

We spent our night in Rachamps in a convent. It was the first time we’d spent a night indoors in a month. The sisters brought in their choir to sing for us. It was heaven. The mood of the men was relaxed. We were finally being relieved and would soon be in Mourmelon. In the morning, we found out Mourmelon would wait. Hitler had launched a counteroffensive. We were bound for Hagenau to hold the line. But for that night, we didn’t know it yet. That night, we were okay. I tried to make a roster for the company to see who we had left. We’d come into Belgium with 121 men and officers plus 24 replacements. That’s 145 total. We were going out with 63. Guarnere was badly wounded, and Hoobler died accidentally. Joe Toye had lost his leg. Among the dead were Herron, Mellet, Sowosko, Kenneth Webb, Harold Webb, Alex Penkala and Skip Muck. A month in Belgium cost us one good officer, Buck Compton… and one bad one, Norman Dike.

10

Fangirl Challenge - [3/10] Heartbreaking scenes

“We spent our night in Rachamps in a convent. It was the first time we’d spent a night indoors in a month. The sisters brought in their choir to sing for us. It was heaven. The mood of the men was relaxed. We were finally being relieved and would soon be in Mourmelon. In the morning, we found out Mourmelon would wait. Hitler had launched a counteroffensive. We were bound for Hagenau to hold the line. But for that night, we didn’t know it yet. That night, we were okay. I tried to make a roster for the company to see who we had left. We’d come into Belgium with 1 2 1 men and officers plus 24 replacements. That’s 1 45 total. We were going out with 63. Guarnere was badly wounded, and Hoobler died accidentally. Joe Toye had lost his leg. Among the dead were Herron, Mellet, Sowosko, Kenneth Webb, Harold Webb, Alex Penkala and Skip Muck. A month in Belgium cost us one good officer, Buck Compton… and one bad one, Norman Dike.” - Band of Brothers 1x07

I woke up this morning with an unbelievable, irresistible need to WRITE. I haven’t written anything in 2 weeks. Life has just been that crazy. 

But this morning I sat down and started writing a Band of Brothers story. I’ve stopped only for potty breaks, lunch, and dishwashing, and now I’ve got a 3,000-word short story about Dick Winters and Ronald Speirs and how Norman Dike got kicked outta Easy Company and I AM SO THRILLED BECAUSE AFTER TWO WEEKS I HAVE NOT LOST MY TOUCH. And also because, even though the story itself doesn’t have too much of a plot and is more my exploration of Winters’ POV during and after the Battle of Foy, it was still so much fun writing Mutual Respect™ between Winters and Speirs. 

(*squeaks loudly and does a little happy dance around my living room*) 

Spiers was known for being a hard but effective commander, but during Normandy many myths and facts added to his persona. After landing and trying to reach their objectives, Spiers and a few men he picked up on the way captured several German prisoners. He gave orders to execute them. Later he encountered four more prisoners and executed, but rumors persisted that he gunned down many more, some say that it reached as high as 30.

At Brecourt Manor he came to the aid of Lieutenant Winters’ men with reinforcements and ammo. He charged for the fourth and final gun alone, running through machine gun fire. The gun was spiked to prevent further use and the Americans withdrew with Winters returning later with two Sherman tanks to mop up the last of the resistance.

The next day, after the companies were positioned on line for an attack, friendly artillery fire was used to soften up German positions in front of them. Spiers held his men in place, but a sergeant wanted to launch the attack immediately, through the fire. Spiers ordered him to remain where he was, twice. The sergeant refused to obey orders. Instead of arresting the sergeant, Spiers shot him in the head. He reported the incident to his commanding officer, Captain Jerre S. Gross, who was KIA the next day. No charges were laid against Spiers.

He and his comapny participated in Operation Market-Garden, the drop into Holland and then sent to Bastogne in December 1944 for the ‘Battle of the Bulge’. After the siege was lifted and the Germans were put back on the defense, Easy Company was sent north to attack the occupied town of Foy. Led by Norman Dike the attack became bogged down when Dike-either wounded or mentally falling apart-failed to respond. Winters, now Battalion XO, saw his beloved company taking casualties and turned around and saw Spiers standing there and ordered him in to relieve Dike and continue the attack. He chose Spiers because he was the first officer he saw. Running through an open field, Spiers relieved Dike and pressed on. Dike had ordered a flanking attack, and Spiers tried to have that ordered cancelled, but his platoon was without a radio and needed to link up with Item Company on the other side of town. Instead of using runners Spiers ran through the town, (Yes. Through the town). Easy Company and the Germans couldn’t believe it, either. Spiers went through and linked up with Item Company and then came running back. He earned the respect of his men that day. Foy was captured and many prisoners were taken.

Spiers became commander of Easy Company and stayed with them till the end of the war. Around the end of the war, when in Austria, Spiers showed he also had a wicked sense of humor. One of his men, Mercier, dressed in a German uniform and was marched into Spier’s office while being prodded by bayonets. One of the guards saluted Spiers and said, “Sir, we have captured this German officer. What should we do with him?”

Without looking up from his work Spiers said, “Take him out and shoot him”

“Sir” Mercier called out, “Sir, please, sir, it’s me, Sergeant Mercier.”

“Mercier, get out of that silly uniform.”

He married an English woman in '44, but the marriage ended in divorce when she refused to return with him to America. They had one son who became a Colonel in the British Army. Unlike most of the other soldiers who were soon discharged, Spiers stayed in the Army, made a combat jump in Korea and commanded a rifle company through the Cease Fire in 1953. He then served as Governor of Spandau Prison that harbored war criminals. And was liaison to the Red Army in Potsdam, Germany and training officer in the Laotian Civil War in 1962.

Already a legendary officer in the 101st his fame grew in the book “Band of Brothers” by Stephen E. Ambrose and the tv series by the same name by HBO. However, regarding the stories such as executing prisoners and shooting his own sergeant, if Spiers were in today’s military he would have court-martialled and punished, but that time there was a desperate need for experienced combat leaders and Spiers was too valuable to lose. When it came the Foy and running through the town, Spiers wrote to Ambrose, “I have no recollection of the Foy incident where I took command, but it sure is flattering”