Nigeria

10

Carol Chibueze: Queer Nigerian-American (shot in Trinidad)

“My name is Carol Chibueze. I was born and raised in the United States. I am Nigerian-American and biracial (half white). My pronouns are she/her/hers. I don’t really identify as anything in particular, but I feel most comfortable with the label “queer.”

- Carol Chibueze (Queer Nigerian-American, She/Her, Tumblr: @deathwalkingbackwards, IG: @lightskinnedbasquiat)

Read the Full Interview with Carol: HERE

Donate to support the project: HERE

About Limit(less):
Limit(less) is a photography project by Mikael Owunna (@owning-my-truth) documenting the visual aesthetics and expression of LGBTQ African Immigrants (1st and 2nd generation) in diaspora. As LGBTQ Africans, we are constantly told that being LGBTQ is somehow “un-African,” and this rhetoric is a regular part of homophobic and transphobic discourse in African communities. This line of thinking, however, is patently false and exists an artifact of colonization of the African continent. Identities which would now be categorized as “LGBTQ” have always existed, and being LGBTQ does not make us “less” African.

Limit(less) explores how LGBTQ African immigrants navigate their identities and find ways to overcome the supposed “tension” between their LGBTQ and African identities through their visual aesthetics and expression. The project seeks to visually deconstruct the colonial binary that has been set up between LGBTQ and African identities, which erases the lives and experiences of LGBTQ Africans.  #LimitlessAfricans

Donate To Support The Project!

Follow Limit(less):

Facebook | Tumblr  | Website | Flickr | Instagram

Carol Chibueze: Queer Nigerian-American

Q. How is your relationship with your family, and what does being “accepted” by your family look like for you?

“This is a difficult question for me. I resent Western notions of “coming out” and unconditional “acceptance” pushed as the ideal narrative for all LGBTQ-identified peoples. These are very white, mainstream concepts that do not allow for the dangerous, destructive effects colonialism, imperialism, and capitalism have had on brown and black countries that are often lambasted as “homophobic” or “intolerant” without context. I have never “come out” and my family already accepts me as their daughter, niece, goddaughter, sister, etc. For me, my sexuality does not necessarily change the strength of our bond, even if they don’t always embrace it wholeheartedly. 

It’s also something that looks so different for everyone, especially among the diversity of queer folks of color. Sometimes “acceptance” means baby steps, hard conversations, silences, inside jokes, undiscussed topics, tears, laughter, probing questions, explanations, leaps and bounds, and other times it feels like nothing has ever changed. At the same time, it does not mean it is easy when the people you care about most don’t understand or reject part of who you are or how you live/love. So I don’t focus on being “accepted” by others in a traditional sense, including some of my extended family. I know who cares about me no matter what and I am secure in that knowledge.”

- Carol Chibueze (Queer Nigerian-American, She/Her, Tumblr: @deathwalkingbackwards, IG: @lightskinnedbasquiat)

About Limit(less):
Limit(less) is a photography project by Mikael Owunna (@owning-my-truth) documenting the visual aesthetics and expression of LGBTQ African Immigrants (1st and 2nd generation) in diaspora. As LGBTQ Africans, we are constantly told that being LGBTQ is somehow “un-African,” and this rhetoric is a regular part of homophobic and transphobic discourse in African communities. This line of thinking, however, is patently false and exists an artifact of colonization of the African continent. Identities which would now be categorized as “LGBTQ” have always existed, and being LGBTQ does not make us “less” African.

Limit(less) explores how LGBTQ African immigrants navigate their identities and find ways to overcome the supposed “tension” between their LGBTQ and African identities through their visual aesthetics and expression. The project seeks to visually deconstruct the colonial binary that has been set up between LGBTQ and African identities, which erases the lives and experiences of LGBTQ Africans.  #LimitlessAfricans

DONATE TO SUPPORT THE PROJECT

Follow Limit(less):

Facebook | Tumblr  | Website | Flickr | Instagram

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This is the clearest depiction of Nigeria I’ve ever seen.