Newsies-forever

there is no heterosexual explanation for newsies

Sometimes I lay awake at night, thinking about how if Newsies (1992) had been a commercial success, Disneyland and World could’ve had Newsies-themed attractions and parades and possibly character meet-and-greets.

GUYS

IT’S JULY 21st

Do you know what that means?

In 1899 in the little burg of Manhatten, a group of newsboys went on strike in protest of the raised price of the newspapers they hawked for their living.

HAPPY STRIKE DAY FANSIES

Originally posted by playbill

This is a perfect excuse to watch Newsies Live again, just in case you felt you needed one.

  • les: them brooklyn boys so big!
  • leader of brooklyn boys: [is 5'4]
youtube

I’m bringing this back 😍

  • Me: *takes a breath*
  • Everyone in a 5 mile radius of me: We get it, newsies is released in 10 days, you're so excited that newsies is being released, you're going to cry on may 23rd,yOU LOVE NEWSIES AND ITS BEING RELEASED IN 10 DAYS
Today is the anniversary of the beginning of the Newsboy Strike of 1899

And while you listen to Newsies for the umpteenth time today, I ask you to remember those very young, very real newsboys who started it all.

When Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst decided to raise the price of a newsboy bundle of papers from 50 cents per hundred to 60 cents, purely to increase the sales of their newspaper. They didn’t think about the toll that would take on the kids that hauled their papers around, selling them for pennies to support themselves and families. These newspaper tycoons didn’t think those boys would realize how unfair that was on them. They clearly didn’t think they were smart enough.

On July 21, 1899, a bunch of angry kids with no money refused to sell those newspapers, demanding that the owners of the papers lower the price back. Within weeks, that small group of kids turned into 5,000 that successfully stopped traffic from coming across the Brooklyn bridge. Not only did that stop paper distribution in the city, but also in most New England cities, which is a HUGE feat. The newspapers tried to get men to sell the papers, but even those men sided with newsboys and refused to sell

After two weeks, Pulitzer & Hearst and the newsboys came to an agreement: the price would not be lowered, but the newspaper companies would now buy back all unsold newspapers; and on August 2, 1899, the strike ended.

The story of the strike is SO. IMPORTANT. These boys are among the earliest examples of not only unions, but among youth rights. These kids brought to light the awful conditions in which the youth of cities worked. They slaved away rain or shine, snow or sleet, well or sick, night or day. And those newsboys didn’t even work in factories, where lives were at risk with all of the dangerous equipment being operated by children. There were no breaks, no provided water or snacks, or anything that we now take for granted because we are used to having our rights as workers respected, thanks in part to these newsboys.

Not only that, but these boys are one of the earliest examples of youth movements! These kids…these CHILDREN…were able to effectively shut down aN ENTIRE. CITY. More importantly, they shut down New York. They are proof of the power that youth can have when banded together. So if you ever think that your voice doesn’t matter, think of these boys and how a few turned into thousands.

I know when we think of Newsies, we think of beautiful dancing gay boys who belt their hearts out about Santa Fe. But today, think about the very real boys who slaved for their rights, and ultimately our rights. Because of their strike, our rights are now respected as working individuals of this country. Because of their strike, the rights of the youth of this country are now respected.

Thank you. Thank you to the boys who refused to be stepped on. Thank you to the boys who refused to give up. Thank you to the boys who stopped the World.

3

Newsies Live Pt. 2

(photos swiped from the Instagram accounts of the cast IDK where they originally came from)

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