New-York-City-Art

David Wojnarowicz (September 14, 1954 – July 22, 1992) was a painter, photographer, writer, filmmaker, performance artist, and activist who was prominent in the New York City art world of the 1980s.

Wojnarowicz was born in Red Bank, New Jersey in 1954. The product of an extremely difficult childhood brought on by an abusive family life and an emerging sense of his own homosexuality,

He wore this jacket in 1988, just 4 years before he’d ultimately die from AIDS. Sadly, just a few years ago some of his artistic work was censored at the Smithsonian. People in power are still content to try and erase his history and the continued struggles of people with AIDS. (Source)

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Art in Ad Places

Art in Ad Places is 52 weeks of public service, a campaign replacing advertisements with artwork. Each week, they partner with a new artist to install their work at a payphone kiosk in New York City.

earnestly yours | pjm

summary: it doesn’t matter if you and park jimin hate each other’s guts, because you will always get cast opposite each other for the school’s drama productions, and you will always have to kiss.
{enemies to lovers!au, high school!au, actor!au}
pairing: jimin x female reader
word count: 8k
genre: fluff
warnings: none!
a/n: god was this an impulse write. i actually got the inspiration for this because i hang out with all of the drama kids in school. the play that they’re performing is the importance of being earnest by oscar wilde, and the piece used for the reader’s audition is from all’s well that end’s well by willy shakes. 

Park Jimin and you have a… rich history, most might say. One that extends far past the most recent years of your life, down to the beginning of your schooling when the two of you were competing for the role of Peter Pan in your kindergarten play. Both of you were adamant about playing the role, but it sort of goes without saying that the part went to him because ugh, the patriarchy.

Ever since then, things have always been a little tense between the two of you.

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Happy New Year, everyone! Here’s what we’re looking forward to in 2018

[Joel Meyerowitz (b. 1938), New Year’s Eve, NYC, 1965 (printed 1999). Gelatin silver print. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Gift of Ronald B. and Susan N. Milch. © Joel Meyerowitz, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery]

From Injury To Recovery, A Ballerina Fought To Retire On Her Own Terms

In 2013, acclaimed ballerina Wendy Whelan underwent reconstructive surgery that left her hobbled, both physically and emotionally. For Whelan, it wasn’t just her career with the New York City Ballet that was at stake; it was also her artistic voice.

“It was terrifying to lose that mode of expression that I was so in touch with, that I so loved, that I so cultivated for my whole entire life,” she says.

Whelan, who was 46 at the time, feared that she would never dance again. But after months of rehabilitation and physical therapy, she returned briefly to the company she had danced with for more than three decades.

Whelan took her final bow with the New York City Ballet in October 2014 — an experience she likens to shedding skin. “Everything I experienced as an adult happened as a member of New York City Ballet,” she says. “To leave it as an adult [after] going into it as basically a child was scary, really scary.”

Now, nearly three years after leaving ballet, Whelan continues to perform contemporary dance. She says she feels liberated in her new life: “I’ve been strapped in — physically strapped in to pointe shoes, strapped into a leotard and tights, my hair’s been strapped up — for my whole entire life. … I was terrified to be unconstricted, and now I don’t know another way I’d rather be.”

The documentary Restless Creature chronicles Whelan’s injury, recovery and final performance with her company.