New-Mexico

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Sisters in the sand, Daughters of the dust || 

Brown girls on white sands; desert dancing, soul cleansing, synchronized swimming, carpooling, piano playing, nature walking, color coordinating, sanging, zooming, laughing, crying, LOVING and most importantly celebrating the beautiful soul that is @saintrecords Earth Day. We love you Solo. Welcome to 30 #thephotoembargoisover 

- Shiona Turini

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Abandoned Bowling Alley Turns Into An Immersive Public Art Experience 

What a time to be alive. The former Silva Lanes Bowling Alley in Santa Fe is now the “House of Eternal Return” - a trippy Victorian house built to scale inside the bowling alley by pioneering art collective, Meow Wolf.

Instagram.com/WeTheUrban

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There aren’t a ton of plants in the Bisti Badlands, and the starkness is part of what makes the area so otherworldly.  But when we visited the first week of April, I saw these small, sparkly plants that I’ve never seen before. 

There were hundreds of them growing in cracks in the mud, and at first glance they seemed almost metallic.  But when I took a closer look at the leaves, the texture was more like tiny jewels. 

awarenessact.com
Navajo Water Supply is More Horrific than Flint, But No One Cares Because they’re Native American

The news out of Flint, Michigan brought the issue of contaminated drinking water into sharp focus, as it was revealed that officials at every level—local, state and federal—knew about lead-poisoned water for months but did nothing to address the problem.

Under state-run systems like utilities and roads, poorer communities are the last to receive attention from government plagued by inefficiencies and corrupt politicians. Perhaps no group knows this better than Native Americans, who have been victimized by government for centuries.

In the western U.S., water contamination has been a way of life for many tribes. The advocacy group Clean Up The Mines! describes the situation in Navajo country, which is far worse than in Flint, Michigan.

Since the 1950s, their water has been poisoned by uranium mining to fuel the nuclear industry and the making of atomic bombs for the U.S. military. Coal mining and coal-fired power plants have added to the mix. The latest assault on Navajo water was carried out by the massive toxic spills into the Animas and San Juan rivers when the EPA recklessly attempted to address the abandoned Gold King mine.

“In 2015 the Gold King Mine spill was a wake-up call to address dangers of abandoned mines, but there are currently more than 15,000 toxic uranium mines that remain abandoned throughout the US,” said Charmaine White Face from the South Dakota based organization Defenders of the Black Hills. “For more than 50 years, many of these hazardous sites have been contaminating the land, air, water, and national monuments such as Mt. Rushmore and the Grand Canyon. Each one of these thousands of abandoned uranium mines is a potential Gold King mine disaster with the greater added threat of radioactive pollution. For the sake of our health, air, land, and water, we can’t let that happen.”

There is no comprehensive law requiring cleanup of abandoned uranium mines, meaning corporations and government can walk away from them after exploiting their resources. 75 percent of abandoned uranium mines are on federal and Tribal lands.

Leona Morgan of Diné No Nukes points out one example: “The United Nuclear Corporation mill tailings spill of 1979, north of Churchrock, New Mexico left an immense amount of radioactive contamination that down-streamers, today, are currently receiving in their drinking water. A mostly-Navajo community in Sanders, Arizona has been exposed to twice the legal limit allowable for uranium through their tap.”

Last week, Diné No Nukes participated in protests in Washington, D.C. to raise awareness of past and ongoing contamination of water supplies in the west, which disproportionately affects Indian country.

“These uranium mines cause radioactive contamination, and as a result all the residents in their vicinity are becoming nuclear radiation victims,” said Petuuche Gilbert of the Laguna Acoma Coalition for a Safe Environment, the Multicultural Alliance for a Safe Environment and Indigenous World Association. “New Mexico and the federal government have provided little funding for widespread clean up and only occasionally are old mines remediated.  The governments of New Mexico and the United States have a duty to clean up these radioactive mines and mills and, furthermore, to perform health studies to determine the effects of radioactive poisoning. The MASE and LACSE organizations oppose new uranium mining and demand legacy uranium mines to be cleaned up,” said Mr. Gilbert.

Politicians continue to take advantage of Native Americans, making deals with mining companies that would continue polluting their water supplies. Senator John McCain sneaked a resolution into the last defense bill which gave land to Resolution Copper. Their planned copper mining would poison waters that Apaches rely on and would desecrate the ceremonial grounds at Oak Flat.

While EPA and local officials have been forced to address the poisoned water in Flint, the contamination of Indian country water supplies continues. A bill called the Uranium Exploration and Mining Accountability Act, introduced by Arizona Congressman Raúl Grijalva, has languished in Congress for two years.

YOUR VOTE STILL MATTERS

Clinton currently has 1,807 pledged delegates who are pledged and an assumed 548 superdelegates. If the superdelegates stay with her, she would be at 2,313. Sanders has 1,517 pledged delegates and 46 assumed superdelegates, for a total of 1,563. The media has been saying that they will deem the democratic nominee after NJ’s votes are in Tuesday. This is not accurate of the facts.

The majority of the media is forgetting to mention that Clinton and Sanders are 290 delegates separating them because superdelegates are assumed, not fact.

Pledged delegates to the Democratic National Convention are pledged to presidential contenders based on the results of the voting in today’s California Presidential Primary. Your vote determines the pledged delegates.

Tuesday, June 7th, is a huge primary day.

IF YOU LIVE IN ONE OF THE FOLLOWING STATES AND ARE A DEMOCRAT, YOUR VOTES TRULY MATTER!

California – 475 pledge delegates, 73 superdelegates.
Montana – 21 pledge delegates, 6 superdelegates
North Dakota – 18 pledge delegates, 5 superdelegates
New Jersey – 126 pledge delegates, 12 superdelegates.
New Mexico – 34 pledge delegates, 9 superdelegates
South Dakota – 20 pledge delegates, 5 superdelegates

Your vote matters and your voice matters. 

GO VOTE.

abqjournal.com
New Mexico scientist builds carbon dating machine that does not damage artifacts
Marvin Rowe’s machine can accurately date even tiny artifacts without damaging them
By T. S. Last | Journal Staff Writer

“The process is important because, unlike other methods of radiocarbon dating that destroy the sample being tested, LEPRS preserves it. It also works on tiny samples – even a flake of ink or paint – and is considered a more accurate means of dating.”