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Unbelievably gorgeous moonrise timelapse over the Himalayas

Holi aesthetic

Holi is an ancient Hindu religious festival, a spring festival celebrated in India and Nepal, also known as the “festival of colors” or the “festival of love”. The festival signifies the victory of good over evil, the arrival of spring, end of winter, and for many a festive day to meet others, play and laugh, forget and forgive, and repair broken relationships, and is also celebrated as a thanksgiving for a good harvest. This year (2017) it is celebrated on 13 March.

Holi celebrations start on the night before Holi with a Holika Dahan where people gather, do religious rituals in front of the bonfire, and pray that their internal evil be destroyed the way Holika, the sister of the demon king Hiranyakashipu, was killed in the fire. The next morning is celebrated as Rangwali Holi – a free-for-all carnival of colors, where people smear each other with colors and drench each other. Water guns and water-filled balloons are also used to play and color each other. Anyone and everyone is fair game, friend or stranger, rich or poor, man or woman, children and elders. The frolic and fight with colors occurs in the open streets, open parks, outside temples and buildings. Groups carry drums and other musical instruments, go from place to place, sing and dance. People visit family, friends and foes to throw colored powders on each other, laugh and gossip, then share Holi delicacies, food and drinks.  

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The daily sea of clouds that rushes up the valley in the Khumbu Himalaya towards the highest point on earth. Shot from the summit of Lobuche peak while acclimatizing for an ascent of Everest in order to document it from the Sherpa perspective. ~

These days many western climbers sleep on this safe neighboring peak while the Sherpas and other high altitude Nepali workers take the lions share of the risk carrying equipment up and down the dangerous Khumbu icefall.