Needs-Source

California is making so much solar energy the rest of the country looks like a joke

  • California is the poster child for solar energy: in 2016, 13% of the state’s power came from solar sources. According to the Solar Energy Industries Association, California is in the lead for the cumulative amount of solar electric capacity installed in 2016.
  • In fact, the California is generating so much solar energy that it is resorting to paying other states to take the excess electricity in order to prevent overloading power lines. According to the Los Angeles Times, Arizona residents have already saved millions in 2017 thanks to California’s contribution.
  • The state, which produced little to no solar energy just 15 years ago, has made strides — it single-handedly has nearly half of the country’s solar electricity generating capacity. 
  • According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, California reached a milestone: for a few hours, more than half the state’s power needs were sourced from solar energy. This put wholesale energy prices in the negative. Read more. (6/22/17, 12:15 PM)
note to instagram-active phandom

PLEASE DON’T SUPPORT ACCOUNTS THAT POST CONTENT WITHOUT A SOURCE/PERMISSION TO POST.

if you see a phandom instagram account posting content that isn’t their own without a source, hold them accountable! tell them they need a source, and permission to post! report them!

PLEASE do not enable people who take and use other people’s content they’ve created, without permission and credit. it’s unfair that content creators’ lose recognition for things they’ve worked hard on.

we all write essays that need sources like 5 seconds before it’s due so here is my #1 tip that i haven’t been called out for yet in my 3 years of college 

writing a paper on alexander the great but couldn’t be bothered to look at more than the wikipedia page? WELL 

GO to the wikipedia page and find a fact that you’d like to incorporate…

coooool honor and glory so Manly™ ANYWAYS 

see that little circled 169? click it and it’ll take you HERE: 

so with this one you’ll get not one, but two sources. that GIVE YOU PAGE NUMBERS. mla in-text citations? done. just paraphrase the fact, and add “…”(Green 5). 

but we need the full thing, don’t we? go here by clicking on the hyperlink -

and that’s all the info you need! now google to find the exact book and more up-to-date accurate info you need for your works cited and, maybe, find a pdf online or a copy in your library. 

BUT THAT’S NOT ALL. for this example it doesn’t work, because the page this specific fact is on is not available in the way i’m gonna show you, but oh well. 

you could’ve clicked on “Roisman and Worthington 2010, p. 190,” which’ll take you here: 

scroll down aaaaaand 

see those blue links? those are available chapters of the book! for free! right at your fingertips! no need to get up and run to your library, or stress out that you can’t find the book online. google books has TONS of resources.

at the bottom of a wikipedia article, the sources are categorized into primary and secondary sources as well, in case you need to fill a specific source type requirement. 

you can do this with anything. i’ve done it with audrey hepburn (my school library had no books/articles of use), world war ii, the hebrews in the old testament…literally, anything. as a disclaimer, this probs isn’t 100% foolproof, but none of my professors have caught on. and in a pinch, it works better than scanning an entire book or article for a fact you need.  

The 10 Elements of a MAIN CHARACTER

To all the writers who have ever been told “Your characters have to be three dimensional!” or “They should be well-rounded!” and just felt like saying: “What does that even MEAN?! What goes into a 3-dimensional character? Specifically? And how do you go about creating one?!”

Good news. There’s a way. 

Great main characters – heroes, protagonists, deuteragonist, whatever you want to call them – have ten things in common. Ten things that are easily developed, once you know what to create within your character. So no one will ever be able to tell you “needs to be more three dimensional!” ever again. Ha. 

1) Weaknesses: Main characters should be flawed, but I’m not saying this because it will make them more realistic (though it will) – I’m saying they need to be flawed because if they’re not, they shouldn’t be a main character. Story is another word for change, or more accurately, character growth. Not character as in “fictional person”, character meaning “heart and soul”. Story is someone’s character changing, for better or worse. Main characters at the beginning of the story are lacking something vital, some knowledge of themselves, some knowledge of how to live a better life, and this void is ruining their lives. They must overcome these weaknesses, if they’re going to become complete, and reach a happy ending. There are two types of weaknesses: Psychological and Moral. Psychological ones only hurt the main character. Moral ones cause the main character to hurt other people. Easy.  

2) Goal: Characters exist because they want something. Desiring something, and the fight against opposition for that desire, is the lifeblood of story; and because character is story, it’s also desire that can breathe life into words on a page, and begin the process of creating a real person in a reader’s mind. It’s this ‘desire for something’ that sparks that first connection between reader and character. It makes us think “Well, now I have to find out if this person gets what they want.” This is a powerful link. (How many mediocre movies do we suffer through, when we could easily stop watching, because we’re still trapped by that question of “what happens?”) So if this is powerful enough to keep people watching an annoying movie, imagine how powerful it can be in an excellent story. 

Like in Up, the goal is to get the house to Paradise Falls.

3) Want: If the main character wants something, they want it for a darn good reason. Usually, they think that attaining the goal will fill the void they can sense in their lives, the deficiency they can feel, but don’t know how to fix. And they’re almost always wrong. Getting the goal doesn’t help anything; which is why, while pursuing that goal, they discover a deeper need that will heal them. Which brings us to …

4) Need/Elixir: Main characters are missing something, a weakness in their innermost selves is causing them to live a less-than-wonderful life. Through story, these main characters can be healed. Once they discover what’s missing, and accept it, and change the way they live to include this truth they’ve uncovered … they’re healed. Learning this truth, whatever it is, forms the purpose of the story for the main character. The reader, and the character, think the story is about achieving that big tangible goal the premise talks about; really, underneath it all, the story is about someone achieving a big intangible truth, that will ultimately save their life and future. Often, this need is exactly what the character fears or professes to hate. 

Like Finding Nemo, where Dory states exactly what Marlin needs to learn. 

5) Ghosts: 

Not this kind of ghosts.

Ghosts are events in your character’s past which mark the source of their weaknesses and strengths. Because these happened, the character became who they are. All we need to know about backstory are these moments, because who the character became is all we care about. There’s really only one ghost you absolutely need: the source of their moral and psychological weakness. Something happened that knocked the character’s world off kilter, and everything from that moment onward has been tainted by what happened. This moment haunts them (hence the name), and holds them back from uncovering that need that will heal their weaknesses. Pixar are masters of this: the source of Carl being stuck in the past, curmudgeonly, unable of loving anyone new? Ellie dying; his ghost. In Finding Nemo, the source of Marlin being suffocating, protective to the point of being harmful, possessive, and fearful? His wife and 99% of his children being eaten in front of him; his ghost. 

6) True Character: These are the strengths, values, convictions, fears, faults, beliefs, worldview, and outlook on life that make the main character who they truly are. 

7) Characterization: This is everything on the surface of a main character. The way they look, talk, act, etc. All of this originates from those deeper elements of their being, the strengths, values, ghosts, weaknesses, needs, that make them who they truly are. So often, you can think of this as a facade they’re projecting, a way to shield the the truth about themselves, how they wish to be perceived. The story, and the other characters, are slowly going to see deeper than this characterization, revealing more and more of the reasons it is the way it is. 

8) Arc: If the character is going to change from “Incomplete Person” to “Complete Person” there’s going to be a journey they go on to make that possible. The external story, the pursuit of that big tangible goal the premise is about, is causing an inner journey to take place. What they have to do in pursuit of that external goal will apply pressure to those weaknesses, and pressure causes change. This process has seven steps, but if I write it all here this post is going to be obscenely long. So I might wait and give this its own post.

9) Changed Person: Who is the character going to be at the end of this story? They better be different, or else the story didn’t work. How do they show how different they’ve become? What is the moral choice they make, that spins their trajectory from “the future doesn’t look so great” to “happily ever after”? This should be known right away, maybe even before anything else is settled about the character. This gives a distinct end goal, a way to work backwards, a destination in mind that you can navigate towards.  

10) Fascination and Illumination: The surface characterization, and the brief glimpses of the true character underneath create curiosity in the reader/audience. What the character says, and the implied subtext beneath the dialogue, creates a puzzle the audience wants to solve. Actions they take work the same way; if the writer indicates there’s deeper motivation behind why a character behaves in the way they do, we buy into solving that mystery right away. We can’t help it. “Who are you really? Why are you the way you are? And how is that going to effect the story?” These are all the unspoken, almost not consciously acknowledged, questions that fascinating characters provoke. Searching out meaning, connecting the dots to find the truth – we can’t resist this. We’re not fascinated by tons of backstory and exposition about a character; we’re fascinated by story, by mystery, by the technique of withholding information and having to interpret and hunt out the truth on our own.  So gradually, the story and the characters will force that character to reveal a little more, and a little more, until we have a complete picture of who this person is. Crucial that this information isn’t told up front. Gradually illuminate it. It’s just like getting to know a real person. 

So how does this work in a real character? Let’s take a look at Flynn Rider/Eugene Fitzherbert, because almost everybody has seen that movie. 

Moral Weaknesses: He’s selfish. He’s a little greedy. He’s a little rude. He uses his charisma and bravado to keep people at a distance from the real him. 

Psychological Weaknesses: Insecurity, fear of vulnerability, feels like the real him (Eugene) would be unwanted, unlovable, and have nothing – just like when he was an orphaned kid. Also, he doesn’t know who he wants to be, what he wants to live for. 

Goal: Flynn wants to get that crown. So he has to get Blondie to see the floating lights, so she’ll give it back to him, and then they can part ways as unlikely friends.  

Want: Why does he want the crown? What does it mean for him? He actually states it (reluctantly) in song: “I have dreams like you, no really. Just much less touchy feely. They mainly happen somewhere warm and sunny. On an island that I own, tanned and rested and alone. Surrounded by enormous piles of money.” He senses there’s something off in his life, something is missing. But he mistakenly believes this missing piece is money, which will allow him to buy a lonely island, where he can live out his days as Flynn and no one will ever know Eugene. 

Need: “All those days chasing down a daydream. All those years living in a blur. All that time never truly seeing, things the way they were. Now she’s here, shining in the starlight. Now she’s here, suddenly I know. If she’s here, it’s crystal clear, I’m where I’m meant to go.” He wants a crown … he needs to fall in love with Rapunzel. He needs to love something more than himself, and find out that love isn’t something to fear and push away. He needs to abandon the 'Tales of Flynnagin Rider’ ambition, and get a more worthwhile, new dream. 

Ghost: The source of all of his weaknesses can be linked to his “little bit of a downer” childhood as an orphan. Interestingly, he isn’t aware of another facet of that ghost, and Rapunzel points it out to him. “Was he a thief too?” she asks. He looks taken aback, before answering “Uh, no.” Something’s gone wrong. The choices he’s making are not living up to that original role model.  

Characterization: Flynn’s charming, funny, smart, charismatic, and arrogant (in a somehow charming sort of way). He’s also rude, contemptuous, and sarcastic. All traits that help him keep up that 'swashbuckling rogue’ facade, and push people away from the real him. 

True Character: Underneath all that, he’s a Disney prince. That pretty much sums it up.  

Changed Person: “Started going by Eugene again, stopped thieving, and basically turned it all around.” He started the story as the guarded and evasive Flynn, he ends as the selfless and thoroughly-in-love Eugene. 

Fascination and Illumination: Imagine if everything about Flynn had been told, right up front. We know he’s an orphan, we know he’s upheld a fake reputation, we know he’s a kind and loving guy underneath it all, we even know about his “tales of Flynnagin” childhood dream. You know what happens? We like him … but we’re not interested in him. There’s nothing we need to find out. There’s no curiosity. And if there’s no curiosity, and nothing being illuminated, your story’s not going anywhere. So instead, we find out – alongside Rapunzel – more about Flynn as the story progresses. And that is how it should be. 

So!

Developing characters in this way, I’ve found, really reduces worries about how “well-rounded” and three dimensional I’ve made them. They feel real to me. And besides helping me create characters, this ten element technique has also let me analyze characters I like, which is strangely fun. It’s a great way to figure out why a character works, what causes them to be so effective, and how you can go about creating them yourself. 

Yeah, I’m a bit of a nerd. 

But if you want, try it out. Develop a character. Analyze a character. You might find it as useful/fun as I do.

And y’all don’t wanna hear this but aceness (having lived through it and connected with other people about it believe me I am not talking out of my ass) more than any other identity like this has a LOT of cases where it’s born out of conditions. It has a lot to do with being in a society where sexuality is expected. It has a lot to do with internalized homophobia. It has a lot to do with dysphoria. It has a lot to do with performative heteronormativity being shunned. It has a lot to do with sexual rejection. It has a lot to do with interpersonal anxiety.

And those are all very valid. But because aceness is obsessive about inclusion-as-proof-of-existence (you know, the existence of that community y’all defend so much but also claim you don’t have?), ace discourse also circles around telling people they don’t need to question the source of their feelings, they don’t need to think about the how’s and why’s of their identity. And like, that’s not fucking healthy.

I’m sure there are plenty of people who are just ace because they’re ace. But there are also a lot of people who are traumatized by this traumatic and inflexible society we live in, and while I’m not saying you’re not ace, I am saying figuring out if there’s an identifiable why might make your life so much better.

Because there are so many instances of people who have complicated feelings on love and sex and thus are averse stumbling onto MOGAI tumblr and going ah! Someone gets me! But later finding out that there was a reason, and confronting that reason, and leaving the label behind. Me included. I was aro AND ace, or believed I was for a time, because it seemed to explain a lot of my feelings on the concepts. But I’ve learned different. So in a way I’m glad that the community became so vile that I turned my back on it.

Sometimes I think about that guy that was like “I’m dating women but I don’t want sex with them, I’m ace but for some reason I’m attracted to men but I could never see myself dating one” and it’s like.. that’s textbook internalized homophobia and performative heteronormativity. And this is what I mean when I say it’s dangerous that the Ace community is so allergic to any critique of its methods of gaining ‘members’ or his rhetoric. Because it’s actively trapping people in a state of non-growth.

You won’t stop being valid if you find out there’s a reason you’re averse to romance or sex. You’re not a ‘fake’ aro/ace person if there’s a reason you identify that way.

And that’s the tea on that.

gay-pufferfish  asked:

i havent been keeping up with canadian politics for the past year so im completely uneducated in this regard, but can i ask what's wrong with Trudeau? I want to be more knowledgeable of what's been going on

A lot.

Here’s a short list I made a little while ago:

-Trudeau is considering selling our ports & airports.

-Trudeau is pushing an infrastructure bank, which is going to privatize public infrastructure.

-Trudeau selling weapons to Saudi Arabia.

-Trudeau approving 2 huge oil pipelines and happy about Donald Trump’s approval of Keystone XL.

-Despite making it pretty clear before the election that communities and First Nations would need to give consent for projects, Trudeau has backtracked and now says that this is no longer true.

-Justin Trudeau bailing out Bombardier with millions, doesn’t care that their CEO’s are getting huge bonuses as they’re laying off thousands of workers.

-Their Marijuana legislation is filled with harsh penalties, and it is not true legalization. There will be limits on the amount you can grow and carry (and if you exceed these limits you can be arrested or charged), and new harsh penalties related to youth & driving under the influence.

-Justin Trudeau’s government is refusing to pay First Nations children equally, despite the Human Rights Commission sending him notices saying he has to (they have now sent 4 compliance orders for him to comply with the law).

-Justin Trudeau’s government is still underfunding First Nations education.

-Justin Trudeau supports Donald Trump’s bombing of Syria.

-Justin Trudeau is in favour of Regime Change in Syria, which many feel could escalate violence in that region.

-Justin Trudeau has not ruled out sending the military into Syria.

-Justin Trudeau is refusing to change the ‘Safe Third Country’ agreement to help refugees fleeing the USA.

-Justin Trudeau is refusing to fund a basic income pilot project on PEI.

-Justin Trudeau abandoned electoral reform (a big election promise) and has stuck with the First Past the Post system (a system the Conservative Party of Canada also supports).

-Justin Trudeau refuses to decriminalize marijuana in the meantime. Cops will arrest thousands more people for marijuana possession before 2018.

-Justin Trudeau is refusing to pardon anyone for marijuana possession despite knowing full well how harmful this can be for people job searching or crossing the border.

-Justin Trudeau is not in favour of a $15/hour minimum wage.

-Despite his feminist rhetoric, Status of Women Canada received no new funding in the 2017 budget.

-Justin Trudeau broke a campaign promise to close a tax loophole that largely benefits millionaire CEO’s.

-Justin Trudeau is breaking indigenous rights to consent with permits given on the Site C Dam and Kinder Morgan Oil Pipeline.

-Justin Trudeau’s tax cut for the middle cut, benefits the top 10% of income earners the most. Those making under $40,000 per year get nothing.

-Justin Trudeau still hasn’t changed or repealed the draconian anti-terrorism bill, Bill C-51.

-Despite a push from the NDP, Trudeau is refusing to expand our healthcare system to cover things like Pharmacare.

-Justin Trudeau is maintaining Stephen Harper’s cuts to healthcare transfers.

-Justin Trudeau is maintaining Stephen Harper’s weak climate change targets

.-Justin Trudeau wants to delay a promise to cut methane (a potent greenhouse gas) emissions for 3 years or more.

There’s plenty more than that. Yes, arguably Justin Trudeau is better than Stephen Harper, but that is a very low bar to pass.

If you need sources on any of these points I can provide them.

  • Shiro: Honey, where's my Paladin armour?
  • Allura: W-H-Y do you need to know?
  • Shiro: We need to form Voltron!
  • Allura: Uh-uh, don't you think about running off to do no daring-do, we've been planning this dinner for two months!
  • Shiro: The galaxy is in danger!
  • Allura: My evening is in danger!
  • Shiro: Tell me where my armour is, Princess! We are talking about the greater good!
  • Allura: Greater good? I am your WIFE. I'm the greatest good you're ever gonna get!
'Black Panther' trailer decoded: Secrets of the new Marvel movie

Black Panther trailer decoded: Ryan Coogler on the new Marvel movie

Source: Entertainment Weekly

‘Black Panther’ trailer deep dive

Wakanda doesn’t reveal all its mysteries at once. Sometimes you have to look deeper to even know what you’re seeing. The teaser trailer for the upcoming Black Panther movie has finally dropped, and EW’s special guides to the footage are director and co-writer Ryan Coogler (Creed, Fruitvale Station) and Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige. They’re opening the door to this fictional African nation. Let’s take a closer look…

Source: Entertainment Weekly

We don’t open on Chadwick Boseman’s black-clad hero. We start with the villain. Andy Serkis was last seen in the Marvel Cinematic Universe as Ulysses Klaue, a mercenary arms trader in Avengers: Age of Ultron who had gotten his hands on some of the precious metal known as Vibranium — then lost his hand to the vicious robot overlord.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

He’s back now, and in custody, being questioned by Everett K. Ross, a CIA operative who thinks Wakanda is just another African savannah. For geeks, it’s Bilbo vs. Gollum, all over again. “One person knows quite a bit about Wakanda and another person who thinks they do, but they don’t,” says Coogler. “But I thought it would be awesome to start with a character who has seen Wakanda in its true light.” But look who is watching…

Source: Entertainment Weekly

This interrogation takes place in a safehouse in Korea, where a few visiting dignitaries are watching the interrogation from behind one-way glass: Black Panther himself, T’Challa, and his security chief Okoye (The Walking Dead’s Danai Gurira.) They know a lot more than either of these men. And they’re worried. The less anyone knows about their homeland, the safer it is.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

Vibranium is the unique metal with almost mystical, technological powers. A little bit of it was used to make Captain America’s shield, and massive stores of it from within the heart of Wakanda have allowed the nation to develop technologies that make the rest of the world look like the Stone Age. Here, Coogler says we see the Royal Talon Fighter, Black Panther’s personal shuttle, flying over the capital city.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

Wakanda is steeped in tradition, and we see a flashback to one of them: The steps of the Royal Talon Fighter open as T’Challa descends into the waters of Warrior Falls, where kings are coronated. He is ascending the throne after the murder of his father, T’Chaka, in Captain America: Civil War.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

In the background stands Zuri, Forest Whitaker’s character, a shaman and trusted adviser of the king. Here, T'Challa stands without armor in a holy place, before his people — the leaders of the tribes of Wakanda. They do not always unite like this. Although it is united against the outside world, Wakanda is divided within itself.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

“He’s somewhat a religious figure or spiritual figure,” Coogler says of Zuri. “Spirituality is something that exists in Wakanda in the comics, and it’s something we wanted to have elements of in the film. Forest’s character, more than anything, is a major tie-back to T’Challa’s father. Zuri is someone he looks to for guidance.” He says to think of him as the Wise Old Man — Black Panther’s version of Obi-Wan Kenobi.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

These children are part of Zuri’s sacred ritual, creating something for the king from a plant unique to Wakanda. “People who read the comics would be familiar with the Heart-Shaped Herb and the ceremonies that surround that,” says Kevin Feige. “That’s partially spiritual. We certainly don’t call it magic, but there’s Vibranium that has been interwoven within that soil and that land for thousands of years, so there are other things going on with it.”

Source: Entertainment Weekly

“The Heart-Shaped Herb is how Black Panther achieves his powers. He can fight hand-to-hand with Cap, who’s a supersoldier, so he has super strength and heightened instincts that give him his enhanced abilities,” Coogler says. But not just anyone can partake of its powers. “The Heart-Shaped Herb is what Black Panthers over the generations would consume, once they earn the title, which gives them their physical edge.”

Source: Entertainment Weekly

The king doesn’t have to face every challenge alone. One of his most loyal agents of the Dora Milaje is Nakia, played by Oscar-winner Lupita Nyong'o, seen here in a casino in femme fatale mode. T'Challa is going to need the help…

Source: Entertainment Weekly

If there’s one thing we know about power, it’s that someone else will always try to take it from you.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

Klaue wants Vibranium, but this masked man wants something more — perhaps power over the nation that Black Panther rules. This masked figure is ready to spring Klaue loose from his CIA safehouse, and the two villains will join forces.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

In the comics, Klaue’s weapon was a sonic emitter he used as a prosthetic for his missing arm. In this film, he attaches a piece of advanced Wakandan mining equipment as his arm-cannon — which is presumably what led the CIA and Black Panther to capture him. In this shot, we can see the limb has been taken from him.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

But you can’t keep a bad guy down. Here we see Klaue in the midst of a heist at a museum displaying treasures from Wakanda. Coogler isn’t ready to reveal the exact context of this scene, but you can bet he has inside information.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

This was the man in the mask: Erik Killmonger (played by Michael B. Jordan, who also teamed with Coogler for Creed and Fruitvale Station.) The man with the hostile name is a Wakandan exile, being escorted into Black Panther’s throne room under the watch of W'Kabi, a loyal adviser to T'Challa played by Get Out star Daniel Kaluuya.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

Here we see the larger view. It’s tough to see, but Black Panther is face-to-face with Killmonger, facing him down before the room full of tribal leaders.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

The camera lingers on one especially compelling presence among the tribal rulers. Coogler says the man with the emerald suit and lip plate is “the elder of one of the largest tribes in Wakanda.” He’s played by actor Isaach De Bankolé, known for brutalizing Daniel Craig’s 007 in Casino Royale. Across from him sits T'Challa’s widowed mother, Ramonda (played by Angela Bassett)…

Source: Entertainment Weekly

This is Ramonda in all her glory, flanked by Lupita Nyongo’s Nakia and T'Challa’s sister, Shuri, played by Letitia Wright. Everett K. Ross, an outsider, is with them in the background as they venture into mountain territory of the Jabari tribe — and their ominous ruler…

Source: Entertainment Weekly

Meet M'Baku, played by Winston Duke (Person of Interest). As the ruler of the mountain tribe, he has a ruthless nature, and in the comics — where he wore a mask and white, fur-covered armor and went by the name “Man-Ape” — he was one of Black Panther’s most dangerous foes.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

Will M'Baku and T'Challa end up in battle? Probably; everyone in the Marvel Cinematic Universe fights sooner or later. But all we know from the teaser is that M'Baku has a knock-down, drag-out fight with Eric Killmonger at what looks like the Warrior Falls in some kind of trial by combat. (You can spot the river tribe leader looking on from the back left.)

Source: Entertainment Weekly

This shot it set outside one of Wakanda’s Vibranium mines. The Dora Milaje stand to one side, while tribal leaders, including Daniel Kaluuya’s W'Kabi (although he’s out of focus) stand to the right.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

Black Panther, king, defender, and servant of the country walks before them with his mask off in a pose that seems intended to suggest he means no harm. This is one mystery we will have to wait to have solved.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

We also get a sample of peaceful life in Wakanda. Here, the king greets a child alongside Nakia under the quietly intense protection of Dora Milaje bodyguard Ayo (played by Florence Kasumba), known from Civil War for the line, “Move, or you will be moved.”

Source: Entertainment Weekly

Here we see political life for the young ruler as he ventures outside the borders of his country to speak before the United Nations — although such interaction with fellow countries is what got his father killed. Some threats can’t be defeated with isolationism. Look closely at the monitors in this still, and you’ll see “Climate Change” is on the Black Panther’s agenda.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

But peace is not long-lasting. In this shot, Jordan’s Killmonger faces down an entire squad of Dora Milaje on what appears to be a landing pad on the outskirts of the city.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

Coogler doesn’t want to reveal too much about Killmonger’s background, but in the comics, he has one of the darkest origins for a supervillain. One should not experiment with sacred herbs meant only for the royal bloodline. And sometimes, in those cases, death might be a more welcome outcome than whatever survival follows.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

As Killmonger does battle, the Dora Milaje may find that the other tribes of Wakanda are no longer loyal to their king.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

Family is different. T'Challa will always be able to count on his sister, Shuri. And Nakia, as a member of the Dora Milaje who is often sent on missions around the world, is another woman Panther knows he can trust.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

Wright’s Princess Shuri character is not only a fighter but a brilliant scientist, on par with Iron Man’s Tony Stark, Coogler says. She has spent her life researching and experimenting with Vibranium, and these twin blasters are just one of her devices.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

As the trailer wraps, we see Black Panther in full costume — and far from his homeland. Judging by the signs in the background, this is a scene set in Korea, either before or after Klaue is captured.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

Take note: This is an example of the bad luck that follows if this particular black cat crosses your path. Black Panther will be in theaters on Feb. 16, 2018.

Source: Entertainment Weekly

What The Signs Crave

Aries: Captivation. Someone who not only captures but holds their flickering flames of interest, someone they can’t look away from if they tried, who melts their hearts with slow burning lava.

Taurus: Fluidity. In the midst of their sturdy calm, someone who will surprise them and move them, who pushes them to their limits, who is exasperating and irresistible.

Gemini: Adoration. Someone who loves the quickness of their minds, who thinks they are the world’s most beautiful puzzle, who touches them like they are a map they will never quite completely understand.

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