Natural history

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The Brain Scoop
Wolves can be… Coy
 

Wolves and humans have a prehistoric relationship - and it’s complicated, to say the least. Between the 1600s and the mid 1960s, nearly every wolf in the lower 48 states was completely wiped out; the eradication of wolves was largely encouraged by government-issued bounties and extermination programs, carried out by farmers and ranchers who saw wolves as threats to their livestock and families.

But after the gray wolf received protection by the Endangered Species Act in1974 and populations started once again spreading across the United States, a funny thing began happening. The wolves - unable to find and therefore breed with other wolves due to scarcity of individuals - ended up breeding with coyotes instead.

And now, there exists a huge amount of confusion about some of these populations; wolves and coyotes are hybridizing at a rate faster than can be detected through scientific studies or can be managed by wildlife conservation laws and programs. How much DNA of an endangered species does an organism need to have before we consider it endangered itself? How can we enforce laws and regulations to manage - or restrict management - of population growth? 

We spent four months working on this video and it’s the most comprehensive episode we’ve ever made for The Brain Scoop. We even got the grossometer back in there. I hope you like it- and please do share! 

‘Times have changed, and the birds must change with them’ - Edward Hancock, 1858

After nearly 3 years I bit the bullet and got my first tattoo. It’s a little bigger than I expected but I love it all the same 💖

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INSECTS ARE THE BEST BUILDERS

THEY BUILD THE COOLEST HOUSES

Here’s a happy video for you. <3 we filmed it toward the end of last year but wanted to wait and publish as we get back into the swing of things – our regularly scheduled content is coming back! 

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A curious herbal containing five hundred cuts, of the most useful plants, which are now used in the practice of physick engraved on folio copper plates, 

By Blackwell, Elizabeth,
John Nourse.
Samuel Harding.
Publication info
London : Printed for Samuel Harding, 1737-1739.
BHL Collections:
Blog Features
Missouri Botanical Garden’s Materia Medica
Missouri Botanical Garden’s Rare Books Collections

I watched a great BBC documentary this week. It’s about this blue whale skeleton that has been installed in the Natural History Museum in London. The whale was beached in Ireland in the 1890’s, and it hasn’t been exhibited in over 70 years. The blue whale is the biggest animal that has ever existed, with a heart as big as a Volkswagen Beetle.