National Museum of American History

John Singer Sargent (1856-1925)
“Lady Agnew of Lochna” (1892-1893)
Oil on canvas
Located in the Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh, Scotland

Andrew Noel Agnew, a barrister who had inherited the baronetcy and estates of Lochnaw in Galloway, commissioned this painting of his young wife, Gertrude Vernon (1865-1932), in 1892. It was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1898 and put Sargent on the map. The sculptor Auguste Rodin described him as ‘the Van Dyck of our times.’ Portrait commissions poured in and Sargent enjoyed something of a cult following in Edwardian society. It also launched Lady Agnew as a society beauty.

National Museum of African American History and Culture.

I finally got tickets to go to the National Museum of African American History and Culture!

Originally posted by yildizyiyenzombi

Being from the DMV, museums don’t really spark my interest like they use to as a kid. I think the last time I’ve been to a museum in D.C. was when I was in middle school. 

Originally posted by yourreactiongifs

Ever since this museum has been open, I’ve been dying to go. But I was always so busy with school that I never had time to scope for tickets until today. Y’all I am way too hype, August cannot get here any sooner! 

Originally posted by abstractsp

If you have any tips for me, pleaseeeee feel free to comment or message me. It would be greatly appreciated.

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Trump denounces anti-Semitism: “It’s going to stop”

  • After a wave of bomb threats targeting JCCs and the desecration of a Jewish cemetery in St. Louis on Monday, Trump finally denounced anti-Semitism on Tuesday during a visit to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.
  • During the visit, NBC’s Craig Melvin asked Trump if he would denounce anti-Semitism “just to clear up the confusion." 
  • Trump responded, "Well, I do all the time,” adding “you don’t know where it’s coming from but I certainly hope they catch the people.”
  • “We want to have it get very much better,” the president told NBC.
  • Steven Goldstein, the executive director of the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect, released a statement calling Trump’s statement “too little, too late” and a “Band-Aid on the cancer of anti-Semitism that has infected his own administration.” Read more (2/21/17 11:55 AM)
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For Women’s History Month, we’re joining our @nmaahc in sharing #HiddenHerstory, stories of women who have often been overlooked throughout history.

In this photo from the museum collection, Daisy Bates meets with seven members of the Little Rock Nine in her home. Bates played a significant role in the integration of the Little Rock Central High School in 1957, despite the death threats she received—one through the window of her home.

Bates, who was elected president of the Arkansas NAACP in 1952, was inspired by the Brown v. Board case to focus on education.

Tintype portrait of a cobbler posing with his tools and shoes, c. 1800′s.

Source: National Museum of American History.

anonymous asked:

Thoughts on stripped-classical architecture? Any great examples?

German Imperial Embassy 

Stripped Classicism (or “Starved Classicism” or “Grecian Moderne”) is primarily a 20th-century classicist architectural style stripped of most or all ornamentation, frequently employed by governments while designing official buildings. It was adapted by both totalitarian and democratic regimes. The style embraces a “simplified but recognizable” classicism in its overall massing and scale while eliminating traditional decorative detailing. The orders of architecture are only hinted at or are indirectly implicated in the form and structure.

I don’t have many thoughts on this particular style, the buildings look like Neoclassical designs after extended Value Engineering exercises.

Meštrović Pavilion

National Museum of American History

National Library of Australia

Anıtkabir 

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hey folks! i come bearing exciting news!

so, the National Museum of American Jewish History in philly is currently preparing to curate an exhibit on queer american jews, and they’re looking for you.

(you here being a queer american jew, which, if you’re reading this tumblr, you probably are)

do you have a story about your jewish queerness that you’ve always wanted to tell? (i know you do; i’ve read your posts). did you read the autostraddle post on being gay on hannukah and want to give a follow-up? are you sick of depleted representation of people like you, and would love to see some in a museum?

if so, submit a story (SUPER CONVENIENTLY) to this tumblr. (yes, the exhibit has a tumblr. what a time to be alive). tell your story. be heard. get images of yourself out there, and then come to philly and see them on display.

hannukah sameach, and may all your wintertimes be queer

Today is Sesame Street’s birthday. We might not have everything in the whole wide world, but Grover is welcome anytime.

This book, from an exhibition marking the 10th anniversary of the show at our National Museum of American History, is now in Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Hidden Herstory: Harriet Powers

A quilt can be a powerful medium for communicating stories, and were a rich tradition among African American enslaved women. Harriet Powers’ Bible Quilt is an excellent example and one of very few surviving narrative quilts made by an African American during the late 1800s.   

Photo: Bible Quilt by Harriet Powers, Kenneth E. Behring Center, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. 

Powers stitched her Bible Quilt in the mid-1880s and exhibited it at the 1886 Athens Cotton Fair. While on display, the quilt caught the eye of Jennie Smith, a young internationally-trained local artist. Of her discovery, Smith later wrote, “I have spent my whole life in the South, and am perfectly familiar with thirty patterns of quilts, but I have never seen an original design, and never a living creature portrayed in patchwork. … The scenes on the quilt were biblical and I was fascinated. I offered to buy it, but it was not for sale at any price.”

Photo: Bible Quilt by Harriet Powers, Kenneth E. Behring Center, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. 

Four years later, Powers and her family fell on hard times and she contacted Smith to sell the quilt. Before turning over her precious creation, Powers explained each of the eleven panels of the design. Briefly, the subjects are Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden, a continuance of Paradise with Eve and a son, Satan amidst the seven stars, Cain killing his brother Abel, Cain goes into the land of Nod to get a wife, Jacob’s dream, the baptism of Christ, the crucifixion, Judas Iscariot and the thirty pieces of silver, the Last Supper, and the Holy Family.

dezeen.com
David Adjaye named world's most influential architect by Time magazine
"Architectural visionary" David Adjaye has been named among Time magazine's 100 most influential people of 2017 – and is the only architect to make the list

“Architectural visionary” David Adjaye has been named among Time magazine’s 100 most influential people of 2017 – and is the only architect to make the list.

While last year BIG founder Bjarke Ingels was the sole architect on the prestigious Time 100, this year only British architect Adjaye was recognised.

The accolade follows a momentous year for the Adjaye Associates founder, who recently turned 50. He completed the career-defining Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC, won the London Design Medal and received a knighthood.

In a citation written by Thelma Golden, director and chief curator of the Adjaye-designed Studio Museum in Harlem, the architect is described as “one of the great architectural visionaries of our time”.

“His work – deeply rooted in both the present moment and the complex context of history – has envisioned new ways for culture to be represented and reflected in the built environment,” said Golden.

“Nowhere is this more evident than in his recent triumph on the National Mall,” she continued.

“Every architect has to contend with gravity – but when David designed the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the challenges of that elemental force went far beyond the ordinary.”

Time 100 is an annual ranking of the people the US magazine judges to be the most influential in America. Other creatives on this year’s list include fashion designer Raf Simons, filmmaker Cindy Sherman and writer Margaret Atwood.

Adjaye said he was “truly humbled” to be among them.

“Having the opportunity to design the National Museum of African American History and Culture has been one of the greatest honours of my career,” he said.

“To be included on this list is a testament to the power of this institution and its wide-reaching resonance.”

Adjaye was born in Tanzania, but is now based in London.

He made his name on projects including the Dirty House and the Stephen Lawrence Centre, both in London, but is increasingly working abroad, with projects in North America and Africa, as well as Continental Europe.

Upcoming projects include a cancer treatment centre in Rwanda and a major new art museum in Latvia.

He ranked at number 41 on the inaugural Dezeen Hot List – our own countdown of important names in architecture and design, generated by audience statistics.

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Donald Trump won’t visit African-American Museum after feud with civil rights hero, John Lewis.

  • Following a nasty, racially-tinged feud with civil rights hero Congressman John Lewis over the state of his “horrible” district and “burning and crime-infested inner-cities,” Trump has canceled a Martin Luther King Jr. Day visit to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.
  • According to ABC News, the visit was originally planned on Saturday amid the fighting with Lewis, who called Trump an “illegitimate president” following a briefing on Russian government interference in the Nov. 8 presidential elections.  Read more.

anonymous asked:

Do you have any favorite examples of DC architecture? I live in DC and am curious because in my opinion there's a lot of great architecture here!

I have posted many times about DC (because I live 10 minutes away), bypassing the expected monumental architecture of DC (Capitol, White House, Library of Congress, Washington Monument) here are some of my favorites:

Dulles International Airport Eero Saarinen

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