Nathan Greno

The story revolves around the protagonist Jack, who fell in love with a higher merchant class, Angelina. However, Marco, a noble who loved to travel (based on Marco Polo), was part of the love triangle. They also met Inma, a tomboy teenage girl who fought for injustice, but was never taken seriously due to her age.

The humans made a pact with a family of Thunder Giants: Feebus, Fifen, Fogel, Fobert, and their leader, Faustus. They were villains with a relatable point of view. The humans agreed to give the giants a percentage of their harvest and livestock, they’ll prevent any danger that might befall the humans. However, as time passed, the giants seemed to forget their duties often, making the humans miserable and doubting the pact.

One day, Jack ended up befriending a giant, which started an adventure.

“Giants” is expected to be released March 2016
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John Byrne’s “Personal Silver Age” commission by John Byrne. 2011.

Included is a photo of the commissioner, Disney director (Tangled) Nathan Greno.

John had this to say:

Well, okay, technically what Nathan asked for is my own personal SILVER age – ie, a representation of the time I was reading comics when I first got into the hobby. And for me, that would have been from around 1956 to 1964.

There are those on the Forum who have shown their first instinct in the case of pieces like this is to seek out the characters who are missing. This time, I can only say, save your energy for things that are actually important. The characters represented here are a combination of my own arbitrary choices, and the bad distribution in my part of Canada in those days. So, for example, if you can’t find Kuurgo, Master of Planet X, it’s because I didn’t buy that issue until long after my “Silver Age”.

It should be noted that, unlike the Avengers piece, there are no multiple iterations of the same character on this one. Each Batman, for instance, is a DIFFERENT Batman. Time travel and magic are allowed, of course – hence Superman and Superboy, since they really did meet during the time I was reading their adventures. (There is one exception to this “rule” – but I will let those of you with long memories figure out who it is – and why it isn’t really an exception.)

Some of you with sharp eyes will doubtless notice, also, that the proportions are slightly different on this one. That’s because the art supply store where I normally pick up these big boards has for some reason stopped carrying the 20x30 inch size, so I buy 22x30 and trim to the usual measurements. In this case, because of the insane number of figures in the piece, I decided not to trim, so this is the full 22x30.

Also, because Nathan asked that this one not be a “graduation picture” like the FF, X-Men and Avengers pieces, prompting me to go for a bird’s eye view of the proceedings, I decided to add a grey tone to the “floor”. This has the double purpose of punching up the figures, and also emphasizing the different levels those figures are standing on, the latter being so I could put some groups on a “lower” level, making them smaller and therefore taking up less space.

Let the counting commence!!

Note: I started tagging every character shown but that would take forever and I honestly can’t name everyone here. Can you?

The character design of Flynn came from the process which was called the ‘hot man meeting’ by Nathan Greno and Byron Howard, during which they set up a meeting with all of the female employees of the studio in one room and asked them for their opinions of what made a man good looking in order to create Flynn’s character design with features such as eye color, hair color and style and body type. Video footage showed concept art and photos of various male celebrities, including Johnny Depp, Hugh Jackman, Brad Pitt, David Beckham and Gene Kelly on the walls of the room.

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“The Golden Age of Comics is 12” commission by John Byrne from 2011.

John has this to say about the commission on his website.

Well, okay, technically what Nathan asked for is my own personal SILVER age – ie, a representation of the time I was reading comics when I first got into the hobby. And for me, that would have been from around 1956 to 1964.

There are those on the Forum who have shown their first instinct in the case of pieces like this is to seek out the characters who are missing. This time, I can only say, save your energy for things that are actually important. The characters represented here are a combination of my own arbitrary choices, and the bad distribution in my part of Canada in those days. So, for example, if you can’t find Kuurgo, Master of Planet X, it’s because I didn’t buy that issue until long after my “Silver Age”.

The Nathan that John Byrne mentions is Nathan Greno, director of the Disney movie Tangled. I’ve included an in progress photo of the commission so you can see just how big it is.