Nasher Museum of Art

4

The End of eating Everything by Wangechi Mutu (ft. Santigold)

The Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University presents Kenyan artist Wangechi Mutu’s first animated video, created in collaboration with recording artist Santigold.

The 8-minute video, The End of eating Everything,marks the journey of a flying, planet-like creature navigating a bleak skyscape. This “sick planet” creature is lost in a polluted atmosphere, without grounding or roots, led by hunger towards its own destruction. The animation’s audio, also created by Mutu, fuses industrial and organic sounds.

View teaser trailer and interview with Mutu and Santigold.

This is Wangechi Mutu’s The Bride Who Married a Camel’s Head (2009), which is included in her first mid-career survey. The exhibition is on view at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. 

Mutu is the lead guest on this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast. She and host Tyler Green discussed this piece, including why Mutu is so interested in placing her figures on grassy pieces of land. He asked her if it had something to do with this famous Albrecht Durer:

External image

How to listen to Mutu on this week’s MAN Podcast: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.

4

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey

The Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University has organized Kenyan artist Wangechi Mutu’s first survey in the United States. The exhibition Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey runs from March 21st to July 21st 2013. Just one of the new highlights include Mutu’s first-ever animated video, created in collaboration with Santigold, commissioned by the Nasher Museum.

Mutu’s work is internationally renowned for exploring sensitive issues like race, colourism, the eroticization of the black female body, colonialism, gender, war, consumerism and globalization. She creates ” mysterious figures pieced together with human, animal, machine and monster parts.

Other features Ciné Kenya has done about Wangechi Mutu’s work include an intimate interview at her home here, her collaboration with other prolific artists here, and her incredible work as the artistic director for a Pegasus Warning music video here.

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Wangechi Mutu. The Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University is currently showing “Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey,” the first mid-career survey of Mutu’s work. Curated by the Nasher’s Trevor Schoonmaker, the exhibition is on view through July 21. On May 23 the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia in Sydney will debut a concurrent (but obviously different) Mutu survey. It will be up through August 14.

This is Mutu’s Yo Mama (2003) from the collection of the Museum of Modern Art. It’s one of the pieces Mutu and host Tyler Green discussed on this week’s show.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.

9

Last night my boyfriend and I went to Late Night at the Museum. He’s a member of the Nasher Sculpture Museum and a Partner at the DMA so he gets all these awesome perks. For example, we got VIP wrist bands to enjoy fancy cheeses and all the locally brewed ale we could handle. It’s also pretty cool to see these big money prestigious white couples stare at the only hip Black kids behind the ropes like, “How did THEY get wrist bands?”

We’re cultured too, yo. We love art just as much as you.

Oh yeah, my hair is cool too. Aaaaand, my button says ‘bye Felicia’.

youtube

Barkley L. Hendricks talks about his work for exhibit at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University.  This is from 2008.

youtube

This is the trailer for Wangechi Mutu’s The end of eating everything (2013), her newest video piece. It features Santigold and is debuting at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University as part of Mutu’s first mid-career survey.

Mutu is the lead guest on this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast.

How to listen to the program: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.

  • Listen
Play

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Wangechi Mutu. The Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University is currently showing “Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey,” the first mid-career survey of Mutu’s work. Curated by the Nasher’s Trevor Schoonmaker, the exhibition is on view through July 21. On May 23 the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia in Sydney will debut a concurrent (but obviously different) Mutu survey. It will be up through August 14.

Mutu was born in Nairobi, Kenya, schooled in Wales and New York and lives in Brooklyn. Her work, which began as mostly collage-based but has evolved to include sculpture and room-sized installations. The winner of the 2010 Deutsche Bank “Artist of the Year,” Mutu has been featured in solo exhibitions at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Art Pace, the Miami Art MuseumKunsthalle Wien, the Art Gallery of Ontario and more.

This is a detail from one of the pieces Mutu and host Tyler Green discussed when talking about her use of color. It’s She Seas Dance (2012), a video installation.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.

  • Listen
Play

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Wangechi Mutu. The Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University is currently showing “Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey,” the first mid-career survey of Mutu’s work. Curated by the Nasher’s Trevor Schoonmaker, the exhibition is on view through July 21. On May 23 the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia in Sydney will debut a concurrent (but obviously different) Mutu survey. It will be up through August 14.

Mutu was born in Nairobi, Kenya, schooled in Wales and New York and lives in Brooklyn. Her work, which began as mostly collage-based but has evolved to include sculpture and room-sized installations. The winner of the 2010 Deutsche Bank “Artist of the Year,” Mutu has been featured in solo exhibitions at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Art Pace, the Miami Art MuseumKunsthalle Wien, the Art Gallery of Ontario and more.

This is a detail from Misguided Little Unforgivable Hierarchies (2005) from the collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Wangechi Mutu. The Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University is currently showing “Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey,” the first mid-career survey of Mutu’s work. Curated by the Nasher’s Trevor Schoonmaker, the exhibition is on view through July 21. On May 23 the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia in Sydney will debut a concurrent (but obviously different) Mutu survey. It will be up through August 14.

Mutu was born in Nairobi, Kenya, schooled in Wales and New York and lives in Brooklyn. Her work, which began as mostly collage-based but has evolved to include sculpture and room-sized installations. The winner of the 2010 Deutsche Bank “Artist of the Year,” Mutu has been featured in solo exhibitions at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Art Pace, the Miami Art MuseumKunsthalle Wien, the Art Gallery of Ontario and more.

This is a detail from Mutu’s Riding Death in My Sleep (2002).

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.

3

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features David Bates. It was taped in front of a live audience on February 11 at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth.

Bates is the subject of a two-museum retrospective on view at the Nasher Sculpture Center and MAMFW. Both shows are on view through May 11. The Nasher show features mostly sculptures, but also paintings and works on paper. The MAMFW show features Bates’ paintings. Bates’ work has been the subject of numerous museum exhibitions, including most recently the 2010 “The Katrina Paintings” at the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City.

Bates’ work is in numerous museum collections, including the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Yale University Art Gallery, the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The image at the top of this post is Bates' The Deluge III (2007), one in a series of dozens of paintings Bates made about the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. The right-hand side of the painting features a cruciform-cum-power pole at on the right-hand side. On this week’s show, host Tyler Green asked Bates if the form’s ‘conversion’ into a snake in the water was a reference to the danger of post-Katrina New Orleands, as well as a reference to Bates’ own many paintings of snakes. The painting below it is Bates' Cotton Mouth (1998) at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington. The final image is Bates’ The Dock Builder (1987), from the collection of the Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington. 

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

3

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features David Bates. It was taped in front of a live audience on February 11 at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth.

Bates is the subject of a two-museum retrospective on view at the Nasher Sculpture Center and MAMFW. Both shows are on view through May 11. The Nasher show features mostly sculptures, but also paintings and works on paper. The MAMFW show features Bates’ paintings. Bates’ work has been the subject of numerous museum exhibitions, including most recently the 2010 “The Katrina Paintings” at the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City.

Bates’ work is in numerous museum collections, including the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Yale University Art Gallery, the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

This is Bates monumental Hurricane Katrina triptych, The Storm (Super Dome), 2006-07. It’s in the collection of the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City.

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at: