In its subject matter, “Orphan Black” broods on the nature-nurture debate in human biology, but in its execution, the show cleverly extends the same question to matters of genre. What does the exact same woman look like if you grow her in the petri dish of “Desperate Housewives” or on a horror-film set in Eastern Europe? What about a police procedural? The result is a revelation: Instead of each archetype existing as the lone female character in her respective universe, these normally isolated tropes find one another, band together and seek to liberate themselves from the evil system that created them.

When the battery in my watch died, I still wore it. There was something about the watch that said: It doesn’t matter what time it is. Think in months. Years. Someone loves you. Where are you going? There are some things you will never do. It doesn’t matter. There is no rush. Be the best prisoner you can be.
My lines were like: ‘But he’s so old! Why is he gray? Why has he got lines on his face?’ I didn’t know him at all at this point. In between takes, I was like: ‘Oh, Peter, I’m so sorry. Terribly sorry. You look great.’
—  Jenna Coleman feeling awkward when criticising how Peter’s Doctor looked.

When I was 21 I read “Anna Karenina.” I thought Anna and Vronsky were soul mates. They were deeply in love and therefore had to be together. I found Karenin cruel and oppressive for keeping his wife from her destiny. Levin and Kitty and the peasants bored me. I read those parts quickly.

Last year I turned 49, and I read the book again. This time, I loved Levin and Kitty. I loved the fact that after she declined his proposal he waited for a long time to mend his hurt feelings and then asked her again. I loved that she had grown up in the interim and now felt grateful for a second chance. Anna and Vronsky bored me. I thought Anna was selfish and shrill. My heart went out to poor Karenin, who tried to be decent.

What has literature taught me about love? Literature (along with experience) has taught me that love means different things at different points in our lives, and that often as we get older we gravitate toward the quieter, kinder plotlines, and find them to be richer than we had originally understood them to be.

To people who support Trump because he's successful

- Trump has filed for bankruptcy four times since 1990. For perspective, 95% of America’s biggest companies have never filed for bankruptcy in the past two decades. - His millionaire father gave Trump’s company to him. - Trump was once $900 million in debt. - He currently owes about $265 million. - His current wealth is nowhere near $10 billion, and is closer to $1.4-3.2 billion. - His net worth has only grown about 300% since 1998, compared to Bill Gates’s 7027% increase or Ralph Lauren’s 1300% increase. 

 He’s wealthy and successful, but not as wealthy and successful as he’s made himself seem. And he nearly ruined himself and his company to get there.

(citations: http://katiehaswings.tumblr.com/post/127862261040/to-people-who-support-trump-because-hes)