Without even considering the superb song-craft on this album and its can’t-get-this-damn-song-out-of-my-head hooks, the cultural impact of 1989 is undeniable. Not only has everyone heard at least a few songs off of this album, but it also helped define the pop sound of this decade, ushering in a new wave of ‘80s-inspired synths. Its themes of independence and freedom resonate with mass audiences, whilst concurrently reminding us that pop music doesn’t have to be vapid. How often do we get albums as multi-talented as this?
—  NPR - Turning The Tables: The 150 Greatest Albums Made By Women (As Chosen By You) - #13 - 1989, Taylor Swift
npr.org
Turning The Tables: The 150 Greatest Albums Made By Women (As Chosen By You)
The results are in for our reader poll, and your picks for the greatest albums made by women deeply modify and sometimes openly challenge our original Turning the Tables list.

I’m going through this list and curating it here so that it only shows albums made by black women,  cause I know black Tumblr and myself would really appreciate it: 

3. Lauryn Hill
The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill (Ruffhouse/Columbia, 1998)

8. Beyoncé

Lemonade (Parkwood/Columbia, 2016)

14. Aretha Franklin
I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You 

18. Tracy Chapman
Tracy Chapman (Elektra, 1988)

Keep reading

The first album to show not only her depth, but her breadth as a songwriter, singer and purveyor of culture. Speak Now was the album on which she fully took the reigns and wrote every song alone. It may even flow better as an overall album. But the high points of Red are unimpeachable. Stadium rock, pop country, coffeeshop confessionals, synthpop celebrations and the most controversial EDM drop of the digital era were all carefully housed under the watchful ear and pen of our greatest and most consistently undervalued modern songwriter. It’s also home to her two best songs, ‘All Too Well’ and 'Begin Again.’
—  NPR -  Turning The Tables: The 150 Greatest Albums Made By Women (As Chosen By You) - #33 - RED, Taylor Swift

Iran’s Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif tells NPR that renegotiating the 2015 nuclear deal between his country and six world powers would be opening a ‘Pandora’s Box’ that risks damaging U.S. credibility in future international talks.

In an interview that airs Tuesday on Morning Edition, Zarif says he hopes that French President Emmanuel Macron, who is currently visiting the United States, and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who reportedly plans to follow Macron later this month, will “impress upon President Trump” that the international community “will be much better served if they were to respect the terms of the deal.”

“I think the United States doesn’t want to send the message to the world that if you negotiate with the United States, the U.S. is going to come back after you had reached an agreement and tell you 'I don’t like these parts of the agreement and I want them re-negotiated.’” Zarif tells host Steve Inskeep during a conversation recorded Monday evening at the residence of Iran’s U.N. ambassador in New York.

Iran’s Foreign Minister: Renegotiating Nuclear Deal Would Damage U.S. Credibility

Photo: Elias Williams for NPR

3
ALERT: STAY VIGILANT… MORE PACKAGES MAY HAVE BEEN SENT PRIOR TO THE SUSPECT’S DEATH.

A man whom police had identified as their top suspect in a string of deadly bombings in the Austin, Texas, area this month killed himself early Wednesday by triggering an explosion in his car as officers approached the vehicle to make an arrest, police said Wednesday.

The dead suspect is Mark Anthony Conditt, a federal law enforcement source has confirmed to member station KUT in Austin. Earlier today, police identified the suspect only as a 24-year-old white male. It now seems there are questions about his age — records suggest Conditt was 23 when he died.

The suspect died in the Round Rock community of Greater Austin, north of where the first bomb struck on March 2. Anthony House, 39, died in that explosion, setting off fear, warnings to the public, and a police search for who was sending deadly packages.

Conditt had been traced to a hotel parking lot in Round Rock after the vehicle he was known to be driving was located. Police and federal agents soon swarmed around the hotel — where they waited for tactical backup, in the form of armored vehicles that might help them take the suspected bomber into custody “as safely as possible,” Manley told reporters.

That’s when the suspect’s vehicle stopped in a ditch on the side of the busy road.

“As members of the Austin Police Department SWAT team approached the vehicle, the suspect detonated a bomb inside the vehicle, knocking one of our SWAT officers back. And one of our SWAT officers fired at the suspect, as well. The suspect is deceased and has significant injuries from a blast that occurred from detonating a bomb inside his vehicle.”

Manley also warned that the public should remain vigilant and cautious, in case the bomber had been able to deploy any final explosive devices because, as he said, “we don’t know where this subject has spent his last 24 hours.”

Manley said the suspect’s name had come up during the investigation and that “we became very interested in him over the past couple of days.” Police are still not sure why the man would have become a serial bomber.

The confrontation early Wednesday came after police dealt with two more package bombs found on Tuesday at separate FedEx facilities near San Antonio and the one in Southwest Austin. They are the latest of six such devices this month that the FBI and other agencies say are connected.

Source: NPR

Dan Stevens on how Matthew was originally supposed to die

“And then this script came in and - so Mary had been pregnant, and the baby was born. And the initial script was, the family went to the hospital to visit Mary and baby George, who was named before the royal baby George, incidentally - so, you know, trendsetting there. And the family went to visit the baby and Mary, and they were all coming out of the hospital. And I think Matthew was talking to his mother, maybe, or - he was talking to somebody, and he had a line like, I’ve never been happier in my life. And he stepped off a curb and was hit by a grocery truck.

And everybody - so the script came round. I think it was - I can’t remember if it was emailed or put in our trailers as - in the paper form, but simultaneously, everybody grabbed the script, ran back to their trailers, read through it. And it was almost simultaneously, you had people just running out of trailers saying, no way, no way. And there was a sort of mass revolt that this was just too - this was too much. It was too shocking, and it was insane.”

The Source [X]

James Comey To ‘Fresh Air’: The FBI Isn’t 'On Anybody’s Side’

The former FBI director tells Terry Gross that he wants to sound the alarm about the “forest fire” of the Trump presidency – and also to defend the FBI against charges of partisanship.  "People love the FBI when they think it’s on their side,“ Comey says. "We were not — and are not — on anybody’s side.” Comey talks about being fired by President Trump, hiding from the president in a curtain, and the origin of his now-famous use of “lordy.” His new memoir is A Higher Loyalty.  

Photo: Elias Williams for NPR

Like, this creature is not - for me, this is not an interspecies movie. It’s a movie where a woman falls in love with an elemental god of the water. The creature is not a slimy monster from a B-movie. He’s the shape of water. He’s a representation of a river, of the water as a force. And he’s gorgeous. He’s - we jokingly used to say, we’re going to create the Michelangelo’s David of amphibian men.

You know, because it’s a god of the river, I wanted to - for it to have majesty and beauty. So I got inspired a lot by Japanese engravings, for example. There’s a series of engravings in Japan about a fish that is called “The Great Carp” (ph). And carps are very revered aesthetically in Japan, and the way they rendered the skin and the scales of the creature - of the fish was beautiful. And I used that as one of the bases, and the others were salamanders, reptilian, blah, blah, blah. But in - to organize it so you could look at it and go, that’s a beautiful creature, and that is gorgeous - he’s not a monster. It is the other, you know? He’s not a human, but it is an absolutely exquisitely design - a swimmer’s body. You know, we sculpted the face also very, very carefully. We did X number of permutations on the lips because if you imagine, the face is very… - and they need to be human, and at the same time, they need to be kissable, you know?

Taylor Swift, whose music has dominated the current historical moment just as Mitchell’s strongly defined the turn of the 1970s, stands for a different central tenet of canon-making, one the original document, assembled by “experts,” obscured. Fan activism matters. Swifties place four of her albums here — only one, Fearless, made the first Turning the Tables, squeaking into the Top 100 at 99. Here, Swift is the highest ranking artist under 30, with 1989 claiming lucky 13.
— 

NPR -  Turning The Tables: The 150 Greatest Albums Made By Women (As Chosen By You) 

Taylor has 4 albums on the list:

#13 - 1989
#19 - reputation
#33 - RED
#148 - Fearless

and along with Joni Mitchell is the only other artist to have multiple entries in the top 20

“I wouldn’t be able to keep doing my job,” says Fresh Air host Terry Gross, sitting in her book-lined office at Philadelphia’s WHYY radio station, “if I wasn’t still so curious about people.” That curiosity — the kind that can sustain a lifetime spent conducting revealing, penetrating interviews with artists and newsmakers — is even on display in the brief moments before our interview begins: Gross, a small woman in glasses and a leather jacket, asks a passing co-worker about her weekend plans, a visiting former intern about her current gig, and me about my trip from New York to Philly, my editing process, my career, the neighborhood where I live, what I thought about Lady Bird. And when I turn my recorder on, the 66-year-old — the country’s unofficial poet laureate of the interview — leans forward to listen even more closely. “If you’re willing,” says the NPR mainstay, “you can get an interview to a pretty real emotional place.” Or at least, she adds with a smile, “a place that isn’t boring.”

Read the interview. 

Photo by Amy Arbus 

Turning The Tables: The 150 Greatest Albums Made By Women (As Chosen By You)

NPR

The results are in for the first-ever NPR Turning the Tables readers’ poll, and they send a strong message to anyone fancying themselves a cultural justice warrior in 2018. It is this: check your intervention. The original list of 150 Greatest Albums Made By Women, assembled by a committee of nearly 50 NPR-affiliated women, sought to correct a historic bias against putting women’s stories, and their artistry, at the center of popular music history. Your votes and comments, which deeply modify and sometimes openly challenge that list, challenged us to recognize that no matter how justified the correction may be, in popular music — happily — no center ever holds.

….

Taylor Swift, whose music has dominated the current historical moment just as Mitchell’s strongly defined the turn of the 1970s, stands for a different central tenet of canon-making, one the original document, assembled by “experts,” obscured. Fan activism matters. Swifties place four of her albums here — only one, Fearless, made the first Turning the Tables, squeaking into the Top 100 at 99. Here, Swift is the highest ranking artist under 30, with 1989 claiming lucky 13.

….

13. Taylor Swift 1989 (Big Machine Records, 2013)

“Without even considering the superb song-craft on this album and its can’t-get-this-damn-song-out-of-my-head hooks, the cultural impact of 1989 is undeniable. Not only has everyone heard at least a few songs off of this album, but it also helped define the pop sound of this decade, ushering in a new wave of ‘80s-inspired synths. Its themes of independence and freedom resonate with mass audiences, whilst concurrently reminding us that pop music doesn’t have to be vapid. How often do we get albums as multi-talented as this?”

19. Taylor Swift Reputation (Big Machine, 2017)

“The old Taylor can’t come to the phone.”

“In the death of her reputation, she felt truly alive.”

“A grower. Unexpectedly vulnerable, poignant, under the brash and aggressive armor.”

33. Taylor Swift  Red (Big Machine, 2012)

“The first album to show not only her depth, but her breadth as a songwriter, singer and purveyor of culture. Speak Now was the album on which she fully took the reigns and wrote every song alone. It may even flow better as an overall album. But the high points of Red are unimpeachable. Stadium rock, pop country, coffeeshop confessionals, synthpop celebrations and the most controversial EDM drop of the digital era were all carefully housed under the watchful ear and pen of our greatest and most consistently undervalued modern songwriter. It’s also home to her two best songs, 'All Too Well’ and 'Begin Again.’”

148. Taylor Swift, Fearless (Big Machine, 2008)