Northern Lights above Lofoten : The Aurora Borealis or northern lights are familiar visitors to night skies above the village of Reine in the Lofoten Islands, Norway, planet Earth. In this scene, captured from a mountaintop camp site, the auroral curtains do seem to create an eerie tension with the coastal lights though. A modern perspective on the world at night, the stunning image was chosen as the over all winner in The World at Night’s 2016 International Earth and Sky Photo Contest. Selections were made from over 900 entries highlighting the beauty of the night sky and its battle with light pollution. via NASA

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In the early 90s, Trump found himself the owner of a personal debt of $900 million. That’s not the companies he owns. At the time, his companies were in $3.5 billion of corporate debt. No, he himself owed almost a billion dollars personally after somehow convincing the world he was worth more than NASA’s 30-year Voyager missions to Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune and Uranus.

You could offer to buy everyone in the United States a drink and not owe as much money as he did. He could have personally cancelled out the Seychelles’ economy by moving there.

While sane men with jobs can’t borrow a few grand, a man who’s filed more 11’s than a fantasy soccer manager was allowed to spend the lifetime income of over five hundred of them before anyone noticed he didn’t actually have it. The corporate debts equal the entire education budget of two states, meaning society would actually have seen the exact same fiscal return if they’d invested the money in educating millions of children. And people still lend him money today. Enjoy that thought as you chew dry macaroni to pay off your student loans.

10 Stories About Donald Trump You Won’t Believe Are True

This awesome image from NASA reveals what Jupiter looks like when viewed from its south pole. And it looks like the biggest spin art ever.

This incredible sight is a polar stereographic projection captured by the Cassini spacecraft on December 11th and 12th during its Jupiter flyby en route to Saturn.

NASA describes some of Jupiter’s features in this image:

“The map shows a variety of colorful cloud features, including parallel reddish-brown and white bands, the Great Red Spot, multi-lobed chaotic regions, white ovals and many small vortices. Many clouds appear in streaks and waves due to continual stretching and folding by Jupiter’s winds and turbulence. The bluish-gray features along the north edge of the central bright band are equatorial “hot spots,” meteorological systems such as the one entered by NASA’s Galileo probe. Small bright spots within the orange band north of the equator are lightning-bearing thunderstorms. The polar region shown here is less clearly visible because Cassini viewed it at an angle and through thicker atmospheric haze.”

[via Twisted Sifter]

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WELCOME TO THE FINAL WEEK OF SPACE MONTH! This week’s theme is….. Galaxies!!

The MILKY WAY Galaxy is home to our solar system. The “milky” part of its name is derived from its appearance as a dim glowing band arching across the night sky whose individual stars can’t be distinguished by the naked eye. It appears as a band from Earth because it’s disk shape is being viewed from within.

It was thought that the Milky Way contained all of the stars in the universe up until the early 1920s. It was then discovered that the Milky Way was only one of many more galaxies. Today, about 200 billion galaxies have been discovered in the observable universe.

Our galaxy is a barred spiral galaxy and contains between 100-400 billion stars, although that number could be close to one trillion. There are around 100 billion planets, including planets in our own solar system.

We’re located 27 000 light years from the galactic center and are located in the Orion arm. The very center has a strong radio source, which is thought to be a supermassive black hole.

The Milky Way has many satellite galaxies and is part of the Local Group of galaxies, which is a component of the Virgo Supercluster, which is itself a component of the Laniakea Supercluster.

Got any questions/facts about the Milky Way Galaxy? Send me a message and we can talk about it! Stay tuned for tomorrow’s Galaxy!

Have a favourite galaxy? Send it to me and I might feature it as a part of this week’s space month!

NASA’S HUBBLE LOOKS TO THE FINAL FRONTIER

Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, the TV series “Star Trek” has captured the public’s imagination with the signature phrase, “To boldly go where no one has gone before.” NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope doesn’t “boldly go” deep into space, but it is “boldly peering” deeper into the universe than ever before to explore the warping of space and time and uncover some of the farthest objects ever seen.

When “Star Trek” was first broadcast in 1966, the largest telescopes on Earth could only see about halfway across the universe – the rest was uncharted territory. But Hubble’s powerful vision has carried us into the true “final frontier.”

This is epitomized in the latest Hubble image released today in time for the new motion picture “Star Trek Beyond.” The Hubble image unveils a very cluttered-looking universe filled with galaxies near and far. Some are distorted like a funhouse mirror through a warping-of-space phenomenon first predicted by Einstein a century ago.

In the center of the image is the immense galaxy cluster Abell S1063, located 4 billion light-years away, and surrounded by magnified images of galaxies much farther.

Thanks to Hubble’s exquisite sharpness, the photo unveils the effect of space warping due to gravity. The huge mass of the cluster distorts and magnifies the light from galaxies that lie far behind it due to an effect called gravitational lensing. This phenomenon allows Hubble to see galaxies that would otherwise be too small and faint to observe. This “warp field” makes it possible to get a peek at the very first generation of galaxies. Already, an infant galaxy has been found in the field, as it looked 1 billion years after the big bang.

This frontier image provides a sneak peak of the early universe, and gives us a taste of what the James Webb Space Telescope will be capable of seeing in greater detail when it launches in 2018.

The cluster contains approximately 100 million-million solar masses, and contains 51 confirmed galaxies and perhaps over 400 more.

The Frontier Fields program is an ambitious three-year effort, begun in 2013, that teams Hubble with NASA’s other Great Observatories – the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray Observatory – to probe the early universe by studying large galaxy clusters. Identifying the magnified images of background galaxies within these clusters will help astronomers to improve their models of the distribution of both ordinary and dark matter in the galaxy cluster. This is key to understanding the mysterious nature of dark matter that comprises most of the mass of the universe.

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Two key climate change indicators have broken numerous records through the first half of 2016, according to NASA analyses of ground-based observations and satellite data.

Each of the first six months of 2016 set a record as the warmest respective month globally in the modern temperature record, which dates to 1880. Meanwhile, five of the first six months set records for the smallest monthly Arctic sea ice extent since consistent satellite records began in 1979.

NASA researchers are in the field this summer, collecting data to better understand our changing climate.

Read more: http://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2…

Big, beautiful, barred spiral galaxy NGC 1300 lies some 70 million light-years away on the banks of the constellation Eridanus. This Hubble Space Telescope composite view of the gorgeous island universe is one of the largest Hubble images ever made of a complete galaxy. NGC 1300 spans over 100,000 light-years and the Hubble image reveals striking details of the galaxy’s dominant central bar and majestic spiral arms. In fact, on close inspection the nucleus of this classic barred spiral itself shows a remarkable region of spiral structure about 3,000 light-years across. Like other spiral galaxies, including our own Milky Way, NGC 1300 is thought to have a supermassive central black hole.

Object Names: NGC 1300

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: Hubble HeritageTeam, NASA, ESA

Time And Space