AU where Spock is a vulcan engineer at the NASA and Kirk is an astronaut -and constantly flirting with him-

(Vulcan has just been discovered and is barely starting diplomacy with our planet. Earth is still using space rockets and Vulcans proposed to send some of their people to help us with space travel)

So unreal to complete my first Mission Control shift!! (With a mentor)

Got to coordinate with people in Alabama and Japan, give one of the ISS GOs for the initial Dragon launch attempt (hopefully all goes well tomorrow!), and send commands to the International Space Station.

I love my job 🌎🚀🎉😍 #foreverfangirling

NGC 660 is featured in this cosmic snapshot. Over 40 million light-years away and swimming within the boundaries of the constellation Pisces, NGC 660’s peculiar appearance marks it as a polar ring galaxy. A rare galaxy type, polar ring galaxies have a substantial population of stars, gas, and dust orbiting in rings strongly tilted from the plane of the galactic disk. The bizarre-looking configuration could have been caused by the chance capture of material from a passing galaxy by a disk galaxy, with the captured debris eventually strung out in a rotating ring. The violent gravitational interaction would account for the myriad pinkish star forming regions scattered along NGC 660’s ring. The polar ring component can also be used to explore the shape of the galaxy’s otherwise unseen dark matter halo by calculating the dark matter's gravitational influence on the rotation of the ring and disk. Broader than the disk, NGC 660’s ring spans over 50,000 light-years.

Image Credit & Copyright: CHART32 Team,Processing - Johannes Schedler

Time And Space

Really hoping NASA Security doesn’t come around like “ma'am you can’t just sit in the Mission Control parking lot browsing tumblr” “I work here I swear I just have no sense of time D:”

Well last night I was an hour early so at least I’m getting slightly better…?

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2017 NASA African American History Month Profile Mark Davis, Armstrong Flight Research Center.  

Mark Davis has been with NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center since April 1990, as a Aerodynamics Engineer. Mark Currently leads the Small Business Innovative Research Program working with small businesses that contribute to NASA’s Research goals.

NASA 

This image was captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), a highly efficient wide-field camera covering the optical and near-infrared parts of the spectrum. While this lovely image contains hundreds of distant stars and galaxies, one vital thing is missing ‘” the object Hubble was actually studying at the time!

This is not because the target has disappeared. The ACS actually uses two detectors: the first captures the object being studied '” in this case an open star cluster known as NGC 299 '” while the other detector images the patch of space just '˜beneath’ it. This is what can be seen here.

Technically, this picture is merely a sidekick of the actual object of interest '” but space is bursting with activity, and this field of bright celestial bodies offers plenty of interest on its own. It may initially seem to show just stars, but a closer look reveals many of these tiny objects to be galaxies. The spiral galaxies have arms curving out from a bright center. The fuzzier, less clearly shaped galaxies might be ellipticals. Some of these galaxies contain millions or even billions of stars, but are so distant that all of their starry residents are contained within just a small pinprick of light that appears to be the same size as a single star!

The bright blue dots are very hot stars, sometimes distorted into crosses by the struts supporting Hubble’s secondary mirror. The redder dots are cooler stars, possibly in the red giant phase when a dying star cools and expands.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble andamp; NASA
Text Credit: European Space Agency

Hubble Space Telescope

Time And Space