Muzzle-brake

8

Fallschirmjägergewehr 42 automatic rifle - late war variant

Designed by Louis Stange c.1941-42 and manufactured by Heinrich Krieghoff c.1942-45 - serial number 02314.
7,92x57mm Mauser 20-round removable box magazine, gas operated select fire, bipod, ZF4 4x scope, spike bayonet, muzzle brake, 30mm Schießbecher grenade launcher.

An automatic rifle designed to do everything and not weighing much for airborne troops, it somehow worked and inspired small arms development in the following decades.

2

The FN P90

Introduced by the Belgian company FN Herstal in 1991, the P90 was developed in the late 1980′s as a response to a NATO request for a new caliber to replace the 9mm Para. As a result, the FN P90 would create a new class of military firearm, the Personal Defense Weapon (PDW).  As far back as the 18th century, there was a need for light, compact weapons designed specifically for rear echelon units, units which were not expected to enter into front line combat, but still at risk of being ambushed and being thrust into combat. Such personnel included artilleryman, vehicle drivers, communications personnel, signalers, messengers, and other support troops. These troops needed weapons which were light and compact so that they didn’t hinder the soldier’s main task, but effective enough that the soldier could defend himself.  In the 18th and 19th century rear echelon soldiers typically carried musketoons and carbines, which were often shortened versions of the standard issue infantry musket.  During World War I pistols, pistol carbines and short rifles were common. During World War II submachine guns became popular as well as short rifles and carbines. 

The FN P90 was introduced for this purpose, but differed greatly from all other carbines, short rifles, and submachine guns that came before it. As a PDW, the P90 used a new kind of small caliber high velocity cartridge.  The intermediate cartridge used in modern assault rifles was designed to be a compromise between a submachine gun and high powered bolt action or semi automatic rifles. It was developed to be smaller in caliber and shorter than say a .30-06, .303 British, 8mm Mauser, or 7.62x54R, and thus having less range and power, but more powerful and with greater range than pistol or submachine gun cartridges such as th 9x19mm Para or .45ACP. The concept behind the intermediate cartridge was to replicate the firepower of the submachine gun, but still maintain accuracy and range sufficient for battlefield use. The P90 uses a cartridge shorter than the intermediate cartridge, but longer than a pistol cartridge. The new cartridge introduced was the FN 5.7x28mm.

Essentially the 5.7x28mm cartridge was a further compromise between the submachine gun and the assault rifle. While shorter than an intermediate cartridge, it produces more range and accuracy than a submachine gun. What is also special about the 5.7x28 is it’s small caliber 20-40 grain bullet, which despite being small, packs an incredible punch with a muzzle velocity between 2,200 - 2,800 feet per second depending of grainage. Compare this to the 5.56x45mm cartridge used in assault rifles which has a muzzle velocity of around 3,000+ feet per second, and the 9mm Para, a common pistol cartridge, which has a muzzle velocity of around 1,000 -1,300 feet per second.  As a result the 5.7x28mm is rated as being able to puncture level IIIA kevlar armor at a range of 300m. The 5.7x28mm cartridge is also known for being very accurate, with a very flat trajectory. Finally, since it is a very small cartridge, soldiers can carry more ammunition. When paired with the P90 the cartridge allows for 50 round standard capacity magazines, whereas most assault rifles have 30 round capacity mags.

The magazines are also unique in that they are top mounted horizontally. The P90 has a blistering firing rate of 900 rounds per minute, which is aided by the cartridge’s light recoil, allowing for very controlled fully automatic fire. Recoil is also managed with a muzzle brake which also functions as a flash suppressor. The P-90 can also be fired in semi automatic with the flick of a selector switch.  Spent casings are ejected downward through a chute in the grip.

Aiding its purpose as a light rear echelon weapon, the P-90′s bullpup design makes it a very compact weapon, being only 20 inches in length and weighing 5.7lbs. The P90 was also designed the be completely ambidextrous; equally suitable for both right and left handed users. Another unique standard feature of the P90 is a reflex sigh, with regualr v-notch iron sights for backup. Optimum range is around 200 meters.

Despite its unique features the P90 hasn’t been heavily popular, with only around 17,000 being produced. In fact, the PDW concept has been slow to get off the ground. Nor has the 5.7x28mm replaced the 9mm Para, despite FN having also introduced a pistol chambered for it called the FN Five-seven. However, the P90 has been adopted for use by special forces of 40 nations. Some law enforcement agencies have also adopted the P90, most notably the US Secret Service because it is a weapon that packs a lot of firepower, but is compact enough to hide under a coat. The P90 saw some use among special forces deployed during the Persian Gulf War, and some have made their way into the hands of Libyan and Syrian rebels. However, the P90 lacks a serious battlefield history.

While the P90 has not yet fulfilled it’s role as a rear echelon weapon, there is one role that I must point out that the P90 has fulfilled beautifully. A role that I’m sure is on the back of the minds of many people readings this and probably the only reason the P90 is recognizable in pop culture. Due to the P90′s futuristic design, it made a perfect weapon for use in Science Fiction films and TV shows. Probably the most notable was was in the SciFi TV series Stargate SG-1 and it’s spin off series Stargate Atlantis, the P90 becoming the weapon of choice of Stargate command and being featured  in most episodes. As a science fition geek, I would consider Stargate SG1′s use of the P90 to be almost as iconic as the phaser in Star Trek and blaster in Star Wars. Indeed Startgate SG1 probably made a better advertisement for FN Herstal’s PDW than any battlefield performance reports.

Fire and retreat from Replicators

This is a weapon of terror, it’s made to intimidate the enemy. This is a weapon of war, it’s made to kill the enemy.”

4

Penn Arms Striker 12

A custom built-built-from-the-factory semi-automatic 12 gauge shotgun. It is fed by an integrated drum magazine. The modifications the owner/seller requested on this example were the shortened barrel, custom compensator/muzzle brake, auto-ejection feature, widened folding stock to allow for larger red dot options and a picatinny rail. Unfortunately the Striker 12, even in its stock configuration, is classified as a Destructive Device. (GRH)

308 🎯.
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@remingtonarmscompany 700 SPS 308 win.
@dmr_llc barrel work: shortened to 16.5", threaded, target crown and clocked the @vg6precision Gamma 762 muzzle brake
@boydsgunstocks Pro Varmint laminate stock
@burriscompany XTR II 5-25x50 FFP
@magpul Hunter 700 bottom metal and 10rnd mag from @aimsurplus
@trigger.tech Rem700 adjustable trigger
@brownellsinc oversized bolt knob and action pillars
@caldwell_shooting_supplies pivoting bipod

3

Turnbull TAR-10 rifle

Custom made from an Armalite AR-10 rifle by Turnbull Restoration & Manufacturing Co. c.2010′s.
.223 Remington 10-round removable box magazine, semi automatic, chrome-lined barrel with muzzle brake, faux-wood furniture, frame case-hardened with bone charcoal for some reason.

This works for me, give this treatment to more black rifles.

holtworks  The 1, 2.
🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥.
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300 Blackout Pistol
@vortexoptics Sparc AR red dot optic
@hogueinc chain link G10 grip and trigger guard
@ballisticadvantage 9" Performance Series 300blk barrel
@vg6precision Gamma 300blk muzzle brake and CAGE device
@aimsurplus E3 black nitride BCG
@davinci_arms 8.5" Leggero Hand guard
@aero_precision flip up iron sights
@strikeindustries_si SI Curve fore grip, enhanced mag release, bolt catch, takedown/pivot pins and charging handle
@radianweapons 45/90 ambi safety
@trigger.tech 3.5lb curved drop in trigger
@inforce01 Gen 2 WML weapon light
@lancersystems Hybrid mag from @themagshack loaded with 220gr HUSH subsonic ammo from @freedommunitions.
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Battlefield Green Glock 19
Slide work by @mod1firearms
@vortexoptics Viper red dot
@ameriglosights suppressor sights
@s3fsolutions threaded barrel
Frame work by @gnptactical
@overwatchprecision FALX trigger
@etsgroup mags

2

FNH FS2000

Largely composed of polymer, the FS2000 is the civilian version of the F2000. The tri-rail handguard is standard on the CQB model but it can be purchased and installed on the older model FS2000. Note the Troy Claymore muzzle brake which has replaced the factory extended flash hider. The FS2000 has been put on hiatus and discontinued for the civilian market, causing their prices to continue to climb upward. (GRH)

New muzzle brake for the AR.

It’s a XM177 replica. (I know, it’s not EXACT)
The threads are directly behind the ports. So the brake slides over the barrel quite a bit, but it gives the appearance that the barrel is a lot shorter, even though it’s still 16 inches.
The muzzle brake itself is 5 inches, but only adds about 1.5 inches to the barrel length overall, compared to my other brake which was 2.5 inches