Mutu

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A few of my favourite photos from the twitters of the 2013-2014 Les Mis cast.

vimeo

Black Future Month: the Triptych (Wangeechi Mutu)

Directed by MoCADA family, Terence Nance (“An Oversimplification of Her Beauty”), “the Triptych” is a unique and profound documentary film series profiling some of the most outspoken visual artists of our time: artists whose talent spans the gamut from interdisciplinary to photography and performance. The documentary is itself a work of art, featuring three intimate 25-minute conversations with three bold and culturally resonant voices in art.

Watch full documentary

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Yak (Bos grunniens)

The yak (Bos grunniens and Bos mutus) is a long-haired bovid found throughout the Himalaya region of southern Central Asia, the Tibetan Plateau and as far north as Mongolia and Russia. Most yaks are domesticated Bos grunniens. There is also a small, vulnerable population of wild yaks, Bos mutus. Wild yak adults stand about 1.6 to 2.2 m tall at the shoulder and weigh 305–1,000 kg. The head and body length is 2.5 to 3.3 m, not counting the tail of 60 to 100 cm. Yaks are herd animals. Herds can contain several hundred individuals, although many are much smaller. The herds consist primarily of females and their young, with a smaller number of adult males. The remaining males are either solitary, or found in much smaller groups, averaging around six individuals. Although they can become aggressive when defending young, or during the rut, wild yaks generally avoid humans, and may rapidly flee for great distances if any approach. 

photo credits: travelwayoflife, Dennis Jarvis, Mahatma4711, 4028mdk09

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When cast members leave Les Mis, they write on the walls in the wings - I took some photos of some notable ones!
Here we see: Samantha Barks, Tam Mutu, Anton Zetterholm, Killian Donnelly and Dame Judi Dench (who once ran from her show next door, put on a cloak, sang in At The End of the Day, then left and went back to her show!)

EXCITING STUFF AM I RIGHTTT

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Isaac Baulot - Mutus Liber, 1677.

“Mutus Liber” (from Latin: Silent Book) was an alchemical text published in France in the later half of the 17th century. It professed to outline, through a series of mystical illustrations, a method of manufacturing the Philosopher’s Stone.