Mix-Style

Playlist atualizada
  • Anitta - Paradinha
  • Ludmilla - Cheguei
  • Luis Fonsi - Despacito ft. Daddy Yankee
  • Kygo, Selena Gomez - It Ain’t Me
  • The Chainsmokers & Coldplay - Something Just Like This
  • MC Kevinho - Tô Apaixonado Nessa Mina
  • Acústico 1Kilo - Deixe-me Ir
  • Ari Acústico - A Droga do Amor
  • Um44k - 4 Da Manhã
  • Anavitória - Fica ft. Matheus & Kauan
  • Se Fosse Tão Fácil (música autoral) - MAR ABERTO
  • Ana Gabriela - O Vento (cover)
  • Ana Gabriela - Pode falar (cover)
  • Mariana Nolasco - Poemas Que Colori
  • Selena Gomez - Bad Liar
  • Andra & Mara - Sweet Dreams
  • David Guetta ft Justin Bieber - 2U
  • Little Mix - Power
  • Harry Styles - Sign of the Times
  • Imagine Dragons - Thunder
  • Maggie Lindemann - Pretty Girl
  • Fifth Harmony - Down ft. Gucci Mane
  • Marshmello - Summer

captainofthestars  asked:

I just bought Darkest Dungeon the other night, and I love it so much! The difference between your usual art style and that of the game is remarkable. I'm actually considering cosplaying one of the heroes! The Plagur Doctor or Jester, perhaps?

Thank you! I love to mix between styles! Oooh you know, not enough people cosplay as the Jester, would be great to see!

Who needs sleep? 

Okay, well… you do. But who has time for that? You’ve got too much to do and not enough time. You’ve just got to plug in your headphones, get to work, and hope that the beat keeps you awake.

Welcome to Voluntary Insomnia: a playlist for all-nighters. 

Above is the Spotify link. Here’s the track listing, so you can listen on whatever music platform you prefer. 

You don’t have to listen in order, but I suggest you do. There’s a crazy mix of styles and genres in there, and I mixed them together to keep one particular type from getting boring, and to sprinkle the really powerful ones throughout. Also, its got a nice little interlude right in the middle.

What is this playlist good for?

This playlist is to keep you awake when you want to be anything but. I called it “a playlist for all-nighters”, but it’s useful for any situation in which you have to stay awake. This isn’t a playlist to help you focus when you’re working or studying- it can get your energy up so that you can get yourself back into a state where you can focus, though. 

Enjoy.

Why the Linda Cho Snub Stings

And here we go, folks: as promised, my first in a series of critical posts regarding Broadway, culture, and my opinion on the state of theatre today.

Let me preface this post with a clear disclaimer: I am a major fan of Anastasia and have been since the Don Bluth movie came out in 1997. I also understand why Santo Loquasto was selected by the American Theatre Wing as this year’s Tony winner for costume design; I congratulate him heartily, because he is a master of the craft.

But with that out of the way, I disagree with the American Theatre Wing on this award and truly believe that the award should have gone to Linda Cho for her work on Anastasia. I think this honestly was the most upsetting snub for me last night. In some ways, this gets to the heart of another post I made. From an aesthetic standpoint, Linda Cho’s costumes were more visually impressive, more memorable, and more original than those for Hello, Dolly! I’m not alleging any animus in the ATW’s decision, to be clear; it goes more to the somewhat staid, static vision of theatre possessed by the eligible voters.

Now, part of the reason I find the HD costumes uninspiring is because thanks to HD being a revival, there is a kind of need to look to the past productions for inspiration, since the director and producers were not trying to go for some kind of completely original setting (which is fine, for the record!). 

But to my mind, the Best Costume Design category is designed to reward originality and accomplishment, not just improvements on a theme. The costumes that Linda Cho designed for Anastasia manage to have a kind of timeless elegance that grabs the eye and forces you to notice not only the actors, but the costumes themselves. 

Anya’s (Christy Altomare) red and blue gowns from Act II have stuck in my head since the very first stills were released to Playbill ages and ages ago. For visual pops, you cannot beat these (all photos are either from Playbill or other publicly available sources, and are not my property):

Both of these gowns exude a classic elegance that is unrivaled on Broadway today, paying homage to the source material (the high society of the Roaring 20s in Paris, as well as the Russian designs included on the red gown) while still looking fresh. 

The lines on the blue gown in particular are exquisite, and give Christy Altomare (who is not a tall woman) the appearance of added height without it being obvious that is what it’s designed to do.

The costumes for the Romanovs are also elegant, sophisticated, and memorable (I lack a proper still for this that I can attribute to Playbill or Broadway World or Broadway Box and thus the still is drawn from Pinterest; if you are the original photographer, please message me and I will edit this post to credit you). 

For those familiar with the show, you know the ones I mean: the ghostly pearlescent white of Nicholas, Alexandra, and the others slain at the start of the musical. The costumes are graceful, and a good match to many images of the real Romanovs in the era in which the prologue is set. But as with Anya’s gowns…truly, there is a level beyond the simple. I called them “ghostly” for a reason: you can’t look at them without having a terrible sense that these people (innocent for the purposes of the musical) are about to be slain. Linda Cho made funeral shrouds out of ballgowns–and that is a metaphor that works on a huge number of levels.

But you know where Linda Cho really gets me? The costumes for Lily (Caroline O’Connor), Vlad (John Bolton), and Dimitry (Derek Klena). Let’s take each in turn, with just one example per.

This is a Playbill still from the Broadway performance of (I believe) either “Land of Yesterday” or “The Countess and the Common Man”. One of my fellow fanastasias ( @nikolaevna-romanova​ or @anyasdimitry​ perhaps?) can confirm which scene/number.

I’ll focus on Lily for the moment. That gold dress is clearly designed to pop. Lily is a fun, flirty, outrageous character, like her spiritual predecessor in the 1997 film as voiced by the divine Bernadette Peters. Caroline O’Connor brings a downright saucy quality to the character that this gown is designed to highlight. The character is a fallen aristocrat who acts as press secretary/majordomo to the Dowager Empress. She’s supposed to look wealthy–but a kind of shabby wealthy, like someone down on their luck. 

So let’s take a closer look at this Linda Cho masterpiece (via Broadway Box):

The pattern and the cut of the dress are simple–much simpler than would have been worn by the nouveaux-riches of post-war Paris, but still quite elegant and stylish, especially when accented with the lace gloves. But it’s a far cry from the style that Countess Malevsky-Malevitch would have been used to in her old life in imperial St. Petersburg. She’s had to make reductions–but damn if she’s not going to make them work. Linda Cho really captures that perfectly. This dress looks, in addition to being beautiful, like it might have come from a very high end store, but wasn’t custom-made as would have been expected of someone with massive resources. While presenting a memorable dress, Linda Cho stuck to the history: Lily is down on her old circumstances (as the Romanov family was post-Revolution) but she will still Look The Part.

Next, I look at how Linda Cho costumed Vlad Popov, the would-be Count and titular Common Man of the previous number. This still is courtesy of Getty.fr and numerous other news orgs, and is from the Broadway opening night:

It looks pretty fancy, right? It is! But if you look at it closely and in the context of the play, it’s in the same category as Lily’s gold dress. The fabrics are clearly fine, but it’s not a custom tailoring, even though this comes after he is restored to some measure of glory. Linda Cho replicates a rich French brocade for the vest and matches it to the morning coat perfectly (more technically, I believe it’s a stroller, though the term is anachronistic for the year the musical is set). But there’s a reminder to the common-man status in the design of the trousers: leaving them striped, subtly, the way Linda Cho did is a subtle signal that Vlad is not born to wealth–no aristocrat would have styled themselves that way. But he mixes the two styles in a subtle nod to what he is (a commoner) and what he pretends to be (a Count).

Finally, there’s the costuming for Dimitry. Playbill ran this still before opening night, and it’s a perfect one to showcase why Linda Cho was such a genius with her choices:

We know from the musical that Dima is a poor con artist, really not much more than a gutter rat as it were and his costuming matches. The fabrics he wears are rough-hewn and cheap-looking (by intention) because he would never have been able to afford anything else unless he aggressively bartered. As a good man in early Communist Russia, he wouldn’t have had the resources to style himself any better–we get the sense Vlad can only because he had the clothes beforehand. Dimitry is all commoner, all working class, all rough (the same with Anya’s Act I wardrobe).

Now, it’s easy to make a costume look cheap–but Linda Cho does more than that. She makes it look cared for. After all, Dimitry has no resources to replace a winter coat if it’s torn, and so we see that while worn, it’s clearly cared for. His shoulder bag, if a bit out of place in the era, is the same: the leather is time-worn and it’s clearly a possession he has had most of his life. That’s not an easy look to master, and to execute it so flawlessly requires real skill.

Here’s my bottom line. The costumes that Linda Cho designed were bold and innovative, and perfectly matched to the heart and soul of the characters who wore them. They took some risks in the way in which they used colors and fabrics, and they blended some modern sensibilities with the design elements and fabrics of the era the musical is set in. That is the kind of thinking that I feel the American Theatre Wing had a chance to reward with the Tony in 2017, and it’s why I feel disappointed by the snubbing of Linda Cho. Her costumes weren’t groundbreaking, but they were unique, they were original, and above all, they felt like they improved the overall quality of the show for their presence.

I doubt Linda Cho will ever read this, but if she does: you own the Tony in my mind, and I cannot wait to see what you come up with for the next show lucky enough to hire you to design their costumes.

[](/abhuh)”Sweetie, what are you doin in mah bow?”

[](/sbstare)”Oh! Apple Bloom! … uh… nothing”

This is another collab Sweetie, this time with @kekerino. He draws nice ears and damn fine curls. Might have to steal his ears too we’ll see what’s good. I’ve been stealing his memes for years I might as well steal his art too right. Think I got a pretty nice mix of our two styles off his sketch, I think it’s got mostly my proportions but lots of Kek flavor.

Feels real good to get back to some Sweetie after all that con prep, unfortunately I’ll have to get right back to horses that aren’t Sweetie because EFNW in a few weeks. Goddamn shame, that.

Anyways enjoy a Belle, and thanks for the sketch Kek!

7

When I’m not updating these blogs, I’m a game designer at PikPok Studios in New Zealand, and we have a new game - Dungeon, Inc!

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anonymous asked:

How do you think Zuko's and Katara's parenting styles would mix? I feel they'll have worldly kids but I wonder if they'll shield them more than they should. Zuko's childhood might make him less tolerant to the negative portions of growing up, making him downplay war, gray morality and court issues. Love the pairing but I think their kids may have skewed views of reality

Despite their young ages, we can get a good idea of Zuko and Katara’s parenting styles from watching the show. Several times, they take on the role of parent or mentor to younger (or at least less mature) children:

Lee (parent: Zuko). From “Zuko Alone,” we can gather that Zuko is more than willing to stand up for a kid not his own:

Gow: Hey! You throwing eggs at us, stranger?
Zuko: No.
Gow: You see who did throw it?
Zuko: No.
Soldier: That’s your favorite word, no?
Gow: Egg had to come from somewhere.
Zuko: Maybe a chicken flew over.

Zuko: (in a threatening tone) Let the kid go.

He is firm, but fair in instructing Lee. Zuko could have yelled at him or sent him away for touching his precious dao, but instead he teaches Lee the meaning behind the swords.

Sokka (parent: Katara). As if this speech weren’t enough:

Sokka: When our mom died, that was the hardest time in my life. Our family was a mess, but Katara, she had so much strength. She stepped up and took on so much responsibility. She helped fill the void that was left by our mom.

There are a million ways Katara looks out for her brother’s wellbeing.

Sewing his clothes back together while he runs his mouth.

Cutting off his supply of hallucinogenic beverage.

Taking care of him when he’s sick.

Katara: I’m sorry you’re feeling so down, but I hope you know none of us see you that way.

Lending him moral support.

And encouraging him to go on unnecessary shopping sprees when all else fails.

As you can see, Katara nurtures, disciplines, and indulges Sokka depending on what his physical and emotional needs are at the moment. Like any human being, Katara gets overwhelmed sometimes, and snaps at her brother when she shouldn’t. But overall, Katara is a top-notch caretaker to Sokka as well as a sibling.

Toph (parent: Katara). Katara is a helicopter parent when it comes to Toph–not because Toph is blind, but because she knows how little real parents Toph got in her own home growing up. She tries to get Toph to understand the “power of teamwork”:

Katara: So, Toph, usually when setting up camp we try to divide up the work.
Toph:  Hey, don’t worry about me, I’m good to go.
Katara:  Well, actually, what I’m trying to say is, uh, some of us might fetch water while someone else might set up the fire pit or put up the tent. Even Momo does his fair share.

And points out that Toph’s acting out is a symptom of Toph missing her parents:

Katara: Ah, I see. You’re acting like this because of your parents.
Toph:  Whatever.
Katara: They were controlling over you, so you ran away, and now you act like your parents don’t exist. You act like you hate them, but you don’t. You just feel guilty.
Toph: I do hate them!
Katara: I don’t think so. I think you miss them. But you just don’t want to deal with that, so instead, you act like this crazy person.

Katara invades Toph’s privacy to dig up the wanted notice that puts them all in danger. But she admits her guilt and tries her best to patch things up:

Katara: I can’t believe I was so stupid. See, this is exactly why I’m against these scams. I knew this would happen.
Toph: But…this was your idea.
Katara: I know. I wanted to show you that I’m not so motherly. I wanted to show you that I can have fun too.
Toph: Katara, you are fun. If nothing else, you’re at least fun to argue with.
Katara: I know your relationship with your parents is complicated, and I shouldn’t have said what I said.
Toph: It’s ok. I was really mad when you said that because; well, because maybe it’s true. I try not to think about it, but when I left, I probably really hurt them.

We can see in the dialogue above how hard it is for Katara to be a kid and Team Mom at the same time. Her no-nonsense parenting butts heads with her desire not to be seen by her fellow kids as the unfunny, boring one. But she keeps trying her best, and in the end it works out. Katara is nosy, but also willing to change her own behavior when her parenting has a negative effect.

Aang (parents: Zuko and Katara). I don’t think there is any need to go into how much Aang is mothered by Katara throughout the series; in fact, I’ve done a whole post on it already. Despite not doting on Aang every single moment of his existence, Zuko’s parenting technique is actually much healthier than Katara’s. It’s also a good counter to the idea that Zuko would be so afraid of disciplining his children that he would let them walk all over him. Watch him train with his new student:

Zuko: I know you’re nervous,but remember… firebending in and of itself is not something to fear.
Aang: Ok. Not something to fear.
Zuko:  But if you don’t respect it, it’ll chew you up and spit you out like an angry komodo rhino!

(Cut to Aang who gives a yelp of fear)

Zuko: Now show me what you’ve got. Any amount of fire you can make.

And when he and Aang are meeting the Masters:

Zuko: Your flame’s gonna go out because it’s too small. You’re too timid. Give it more juice.
Aang: But what if I can’t control it?
Zuko: You can do it. I know you can. You’re a talented kid.

Zuko is, again, firm but fair, and encourages Aang when he shows improvement. While he would be understandably wary of punishing children, he is under no illusions about how hard and dangerous the world can be, even for someone as young as Aang. He understands that leaving Aang unprepared by pampering him would expose Aang to greater danger in the long run.

But Katara … oh, Katara definitely has problems with discipline where Aang is concerned. She doesn’t know how to stop giving Aang time and attention, and she doesn’t know how to do tough love, at least not towards the Avatar. I would argue that Katara is too wrapped up in seeing Aang as a symbol of hope who can do no wrong in her eyes to give Aang an honest assessment of who he is. She does provide a lot of hand-holding and emotional support that Zuko would be uncomfortable with, so if she were and Zuko were parenting Aang together, he might turn out OK. Still, there is no evidence that Katara would spoil a non-Avatar child, so I’m inclined to count Aang as an outlier due to his status as the Avatar.

Together, Katara and Zuko’s parenting styles combine support, discipline, encouragement, attention, comfort, protection, education, and love. They support the interests of the kids under their care and do their best to protect them from harm. But they also help the kids protect themselves–both by encouraging their fighting skills, and by creating as safe of an environment as they can within the group, while fighting a very unsafe war.