Missions

10 Questions About the 2017 Astronaut Class

We will select between eight and 14 new astronaut candidates from among a record-breaking applicant class of more than 18,300, almost three times the number of applications the agency received in 2012 for the recent astronaut class, and far surpassing the previous record of 8,000 in 1978.

The candidates will be announced at an event at our Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas at 2 p.m. EDT on June 7. You can find more information on how to watch the announcement HERE.

1. What are the qualifications for becoming an astronaut?

Applicants must meet the following minimum requirements before submitting an application.

  • Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution in engineering, biological science, physical science, computer science or mathematics. 
  • Degree must be followed by at least 3 years of related, progressively responsible, professional experience or at least 1,000 hours of pilot-in-command time in jet aircraft
  • Ability to pass the NASA Astronaut physical.

For more information, visit: https://astronauts.nasa.gov/content/faq.htm

2. What have selections looked like in the past?

There have been 22 classes of astronauts selected from the original “Mercury Seven” in 1959 to the most recent 2017 class. Other notable classes include:

  • The fourth class in 1965 known as “The Scientists: because academic experience was favored over pilot skills. 
  • The eighth class in 1978 was a huge step forward for diversity, featuring the first female, African American and Asian American selections.
  • The 16th class in 1996 was the largest class yet with 44 members – 35 U.S. astronauts and 9 international astronauts. They were selected for the frequent Space Shuttle flights and the anticipated need for International Space Station crewmembers.
  • The 21st class in 2013 was the first class to have 50/50 gender split with 4 female members and 4 male members.

3. What vehicles will they fly in?

They could be assigned on any of four different spacecraft: the International Space Station, our Orion spacecraft for deep space exploration or one of two American-made commercial crew spacecraft currently in development – Boeing’s CST-199 Starliner or the SpaceX Crew Dragon.

4. Where will they go?

These astronauts will be part of expanded crews aboard the space station that will significantly increase the crew time available to conduct the important research and technology demonstrations that are advancing our knowledge for missions farther into space than humans have gone before, while also returning benefits to Earth. They will also be candidates for missions beyond the moon and into deep space aboard our Orion spacecraft on flights that help pave the way for missions to Mars.

5. What will their roles be?

After completing two years of general training, these astronaut candidates will be considered full astronauts, eligible to be assigned spaceflight missions. While they wait for their turn, they will be given duties within the Astronaut Office at Johnson Space Center. Technical duties can range from supporting current missions in roles such as CAPCOM in Mission Control, to advising on the development of future spacecraft.

6. What will their training look like?

The first two years of astronaut candidate training will focus on the basic skills astronauts need. They’ll practice for spacewalks in Johnson’s 60-foot deep swimming pool, the Neutral Buoyancy Lab, which requires SCUBA certification. They’ll also simulate bringing visiting spacecraft in for a berthing to the space station using its robotic arm, Canadarm2, master the ins and outs of space station system and learn Russian. 

And, whether they have previous experience piloting an aircraft of not, they’ll learn to fly our fleet of T-38s. In addition, they’ll perfect their expeditionary skills, such as leadership and fellowship, through activities like survival training and geology treks.

7.  What kinds of partners will they work with?

They will join a team that supports missions going on at many different NASA centers across the country, but they’ll also interact with commercial partners developing spaceflight hardware. In addition, they will work with our international partners around the globe: ESA (the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and the Russian space agency, Roscosmos.

8. How does the selection process work?

All 18,353 of the applications submitted were reviewed by human resources experts to determine if they met the basic qualifications. Those that did were then each reviewed by a panel of about 50 people, made up primarily of current astronauts. Called the Astronaut Rating Panel, that group narrowed to applicants down to a few hundred of what they considered the most highly qualified individuals, whose references were then checked.

From that point, a smaller group called the Astronaut Selection Board brought in the top 120 applicants for an intense round of interviews and some initial medical screening tests. That group is further culled to the top 50 applicants afterward, who are brought back for a second round of interviews and additional screening. The final candidates are selected from that group.

9. How do they get notified?

Each applicant selected to become an astronaut receives a phone call from the head of the Flight Operations Directorate at our Johnson Space Center and the chief of the astronaut office. They’re asked to share the good news with only their immediate family until their selection has been officially announced.

10. How does the on boarding process work?

Astronaut candidates will report for duty at Johnson Space Center in August 2017, newly fitted flight suits in tow, and be sworn into civil service. Between their selection and their report for duty, they will make arrangements to leave their current positions and relocate with their family to Houston, Texas.

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ME 2 LOYALTY MISSIONS IN A NUTSHELL

Jacob: Shepard, my father.

Miranda: Shepard, my sister.

Samara: Shepard, my daughter.

Thane: Shepard, my son.

Mordin: Shepard, my student.

Kasumi: Shepard, the graybox.

Tali: Shepard, my father.

Legion: Shepard Commander, our people.

Zaeed: Goddamn I want revenge.

Jack: Fuck that place.

Garrus: I want that guy dead.

Grunt: K - I - L- L

Next Weeks Songs

RAP POSITION
ZICO - Boys and Girls
Mino feat. Taeyang - Fear
Simon D. One, G2 BewhY - Who You
iKON - Rhythm Ta

VOCAL POSITION
BoA - Amazing Kiss
Jung Seunghwan - If It Is You
BLACKPINK - Playing With Fire
BTS - Spring Day
I.O.I - Downpour

DANCE POSITION
Flo Rida - Right Round
Jason Derulo - Get Ugly
N’Sync - Pop
Ed Sheeran - Shape Of You

Concepts for evaluation:
Showtime - nu disco
I know you know - synth pop/funk
열어줘 - Future edm
Never - deep house
Oh little girl - hip hop

Imagine due to having highly effective telekinesis, Tony Stark seeks you out and hires you. Loki’s been forced to live there by Odin and help on missions when needed, making penance to Midgardians. Prior to moving into the Tower, you learn of his superior and arrogant attitude and upon being introduced, immediately dislike him. Particularly because he looks at you like your his next meal.

Naruto RP Mission Starters

Rank D. Finding someone’s lost/run-away pet.

Rank D. Carrying and distributing water/food/supplies around workers/farmers and giving first-aid help if needed.

Rank D. Taking a violent dog for a walk.

Rank D. Taking care of a garden.

Rank D. Taking care for on old person.

Rank D. Baby-sitting/kids watching.

Rank D. Helping duties at a temple.

Rank D. Gathering herbs.

Rank D. Gathering food/water supply.

Rank D. Delivering mail inside the village or nearby places (within the land).

C rank. Delivering mail in a long distance or to another country.

C rank. Escorting a single person from x to y. Protection from bandits.

C rank. Catching a wild animal that’s destroying supplies/scaring people/attacking people/attacking livestock/a run-away ninja animal.

C rank. Guard duty in the village for a day.

C rank. Guard duty at the gates of the village.

C rank. Be a squad leader for a day to a 3-man academy students team.

C rank. Carrying out a drill.

C rank. Being a teacher at the academy for a day.

B rank. Espionage.

B rank. Investigation.

B rank. Tracking someone down.

B rank. Taking out a single person/ninja.

B rank. Guarding/transporting a group of people.

B rank. The village is under attack. Secure villagers to safety.

B rank. Head of security for a big event.

B rank. Delivering an important message where something more valuable is at stake.

B rank. Catching bandits or minor shinobi/hunting down lesser missing-nin.

B rank. Transporting a dangerous criminal to a prison.

B rank. Guarding a scroll with secret/forbidden techniques.

A rank. Leading a platoon to assault an enemy force.

A rank. Engaging enemy forces/ambushing enemy forces.

A rank. Infiltrating an enemy village in order to gather information for the long-run or shortly in order to get hands on something valuable.

A rank. Stealing a horbidden technique/weapon/treasure.

A rank. Eliminating an important/authoritative/famous/VIP figure.

A rank. Guarding an important/authoritative/famous/VIP figure.

A rank. Hunting down a notorious missing-nin.

A rank. Gather information on a dangerous subject that should remain in secracy.

S rank. Wiping out a whole organisation/mass murder.

S rank. Destroying a village.

S rank. Taking out an S-class criminal.

S rank. Disposing of an authoritative shinobi (examples: kage, village hero, someone of great value to a village)

S rank. Bounty-hunting.

S rank. Designing a forbidden technique in secrecy for a village to use against other villages.

S rank. Hunting down bijuu.

Space Missions Come Together in Colorado

Our leadership hit the road to visit our commercial partners Lockheed Martin, Sierra Nevada Corp. and Ball Aerospace in Colorado. They were able to check the status of flight hardware, mission operations and even test virtual reality simulations that help these companies build spacecraft parts.

Let’s take a look at all the cool technology they got to see…

Lockheed Martin

Lockheed Martin is the prime contractor building our Orion crew vehicle, the only spacecraft designed to take humans into deep space farther than they’ve ever gone before.

Acting NASA Deputy Administrator Lesa Roe and Acting NASA Administrator Robert Lightfoot are seen inside the CHIL…the Collaborative Human Immersive Laboratory at Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Littleton, Colo. Lockheed Martin’s CHIL enables collaboration between spacecraft design and manufacturing teams before physically producing hardware.

Cool shades! The ability to visualize engineering designs in virtual reality offers tremendous savings in time and money compared to using physical prototypes. Technicians can practice how to assemble and install components, the shop floor can validate tooling and work platform designs, and engineers can visualize performance characteristics like thermal, stress and aerodynamics, just like they are looking at the real thing.

This heat shield, which was used as a test article for the Mars Curiosity Rover, will now be used as the flight heat shield for the Mars 2020 rover mission.

Fun fact: Lockheed Martin has built every Mars heat shield and aeroshell for us since the Viking missions in 1976.

Here you can see Lockheed Martin’s Mission Support Area. Engineers in this room support six of our robotic planetary spacecraft: Mars Odyssey, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, MAVEN, Juno, OSIRIS-REx and Spitzer, which recently revealed the first known system of seven Earth-size planets around a single star, TRAPPIST-1. They work with NASA centers and the mission science teams to develop and send commands and monitor the health of the spacecraft.

See all the pictures from the Lockheed Martin visit HERE

Sierra Nevada Corporation

Next, Lightfoot and Roe went to Sierra Nevada Corporation in Louisville, Colo. to get an update about its Dream Chaser vehicle. This spacecraft will take cargo to and from the International Space Station as part of our commercial cargo program.

Here, Sierra Nevada Corporation’s Vice President of Space Exploration Systems Steve Lindsey (who is also a former test pilot and astronaut!) speaks with Lightfoot and Roe about the Dream Chaser Space System simulator.

Lightfoot climbed inside the Dream Chaser simulator where he “flew” the crew version of the spacecraft to a safe landing. This mock-up facility enables approach-and-landing simulations as well as other real-life situations. 

See all the images from the Sierra Nevada visit HERE.

Ball Aerospace

Lightfoot and Roe went over to Ball Aerospace to tour its facility. Ball is another one of our commercial aerospace partners and helps builds instruments that are on NASA spacecraft throughout the universe, including the Hubble Space Telescope and the New Horizons mission to Pluto. Ball designed and built the advanced optical technology and lightweight mirror system that will enable the James Webb Space Telescope to look 13.5 billion years back in time. 

Looking into the clean room at Ball Aerospace’s facility in Boulder, Colo., the team can see the Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite. These sensors are used on spacecraft to track ozone measurements.

Here, the group stands in front of a thermal vacuum chamber used to test satellite optics. The Operation Land Imager-2 is being built for Landsat 9, a collaboration between NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey that will continue the Landsat Program’s 40-year data record monitoring the Earth’s landscapes from space.

See all the pictures from the Ball Aerospace visit HERE

We recently marked a decade since a new era began in commercial spaceflight development for low-Earth orbit transportation. We inked agreements in 2006 to develop rockets and spacecraft capable of carrying cargo such as experiments and supplies to and from the International Space Station. Learn more about commercial space HERE.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

7

Extra Missions for 5☆ Characters
Duration: 3/24 (Fri) 5:00~

Extra Missions will be added that can be cleared for various rewards, such as gald and exp books, with a final reward of a 5☆ character of your choice. Each mission is cleared by clearing all Daily Missions.

The rewards for each Extra Mission are:
1 Time  = 30,000 gald
2 Times = 40 4☆ exp books
3 Times = 50,000 gald
4 Times = 20 3☆ arte exp books
5 Times = 100,000 gald
6 Times = 3☆ limit break gem
7 Times = choice of 5☆

※ As of right now, you can only choose one character to summon. Additional missions/characters may be added in the future.

For new players and players returning after a long period of inactivity, all quests will cost ½ AP for 14 days.

Character details under the cut.

Keep reading

I turned my grandmother’s grad gift into a summer journal.

On the left is a bit of a bouquet from my last dance recital as a high school student. On the right is the path that my plane took to get to Honduras and back. I made another journal while I was down there. I might put some of those pics on here too… We’ll see.

❤-Bananna
6 July 2017