MichelleDockery

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OH MY BABIES!!!!! 😍😍😭😭😭
I will upload more parts of this interview tomorrow but I couldn’t resist uploading this one now. 😍🙈

LOOOK GUYS! He was asked to do a New York accent and he’s so cute and his expressions asjksbsg 😍 and omg Liz!!! Oh, my Liz was so impressed haha and how she leaned forward to give him an appreciation hug and she’s such a doll. She’s Hugh’s doll and he kissed her cheek so sweetly, gosh! Guys, McGonneville are making me mad. I can’t deal with this! Oh, my precious little darlings. 😍😍😍😍😘😭
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#hughbonneville #elizabethmcgovern #mcgonneville #coracrawley #robertcrawley #cobert #dowtonpbs #downtonabbey #da #michelledockery #marycrawley #thetalk

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matthumphreyimages: Winding the clock back to a backstage portrait of the awesome @theladydockers at The Old Vic - during the run of Pygmalion. Such a fun show to work on, and one of my favourite people to work with - a truly generous, genuine, and talented human.
#artofbackstage #backstage #portrait #portraiture #downtonabbey #michelledockery #ladymary #theoldvic #pygmalion #flashback #funtimes

Girl in Venice: The Creativity of Acting

For today’s conversation Ingrid Sischy of Vanity Fair was the moderator. 

Freida Pinto is from Mumbai and best known for her debut work in Slumdog Millionaire (2008). In 2010, she starred in Woody Allen’s You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger and Miral by Julian Schanbel. Her other recent films include Immortals (2011), Day of the Falcom (2012), Trishna (2012), Knight of Cups (2013), and Desert Dancer (2013).

Michelle Dockery is a Golden Globe and Emmy nominated English actress and singer. She is best known as Lady Mary Crawley on Downtown Abbey. Her role in Burnt by the Sun earned a Laurence Olivier Award for Best Supporting Actress. She has also performed on stage in Pygmalion, The Pillars of Society, and Hamlet as Ophelia. She also starred with Charlotte Rampling in the spy thriller Restless for BBC One in 2012.

Here is an excerpt from the conversation::

Both of you come from a film culture where humor is a driving force. Can you tell us about the creative stuff of humor?

FREIDA: I haven’t been given that chance to make people or myself laugh. For some reason people see me as a serious drama actor. My friend Sophie and I enjoy comedy, and have a good laugh. I am surrounded by people who are great comedic actors. I love that they are so free and not afraid. I have been so committed to drama, I am waiting for a role in which I can be free and goofy and it is a lot harder.

MICHELLE: There is a different focus with comedy. I am a terrible corpse, which is if someone makes you laugh you lose your focus. Working with Maggie Smith, I have to concentrate to not lose my focus. But it’s another way of being able to lose control. One of my favorite films of last few years was Bridesmaids, women being beautiful but free to be ridiculous. Kristen Wigg is someone who inspires me. I am floored by her ability to improvise off the cuff. Her technique in comic timing. I think you can learn it but it’s in some actors naturally like Maggie Smith. Julian writes one liners for her like “what is a weekend?” which she uses between takes. One day were talking about the flu going around. She came over and said “are you well?” I said I feel all right in myself. And she said “Well who else did you have in mind?”