Meteor-shower

Here are the dates of every major meteor shower in 2017

Quadrantids: Jan. 1-10

According to the American Meteor Society, these meteors have the potential to become one of the most spectacular showers of the year, though it can fall short because of fickle January weather conditions and its relatively brief six-hour period of peak activity. Its peak night occurs Jan. 3-4.

Lyrids:  Apr. 16-25

The AMS says Lyrid is a medium-strength shower that can be seen from the Northern Hemisphere at dawn, as well as from the Southern Hemisphere — albeit at a lower rate. Its peak night takes place on Apr. 21-22.

Eta Aquariids: Apr. 19-May 26

The Eta Aquariid shower is stronger if seen from the southern tropics. Its peak night occurs on May 6-7, according to Basic Astronomy.

Alpha Capricornids: Jul. 11-Aug. 10

This shower is not too strong but, unlike many, it can be seen on either side of the equator, according to the AMS. Its peak night takes place Jul. 26-27.

Delta Aquariids: Jul. 21-Aug. 23

The Delta Aquariid has a stronger presence in the southern tropics, but its meteoroids lack persistent trains and fireballs. Its peak night occurs Jul. 29-30, according to the AMS.

Perseids: Jul. 13-Aug. 26

Among stargazers in the U.S., Perseid is one of the most popular meteor showers, as it peaks on August nights and can be seen from the Northern Hemisphere. According to Basic Astronomy, its peak night takes place on Aug. 12-13.

Orionids: Oct. 4-Nov. 14

The Orionids create a medium-strength shower that sometimes reaches higher activity like Perseid. The shower’s peak night is Oct. 21-22, according to Basic Astronomy.

Southern Taurids: Sept. 7-Nov. 19

The falling Southern Taurids result in a long-lasting shower but one produces just more than five shower members per hour, a relatively low number. Its peak night takes place on Oct. 9-10, according to the AMS.

Northern Taurids: Oct. 19-Dec. 10.

Like the Southern Taurids, Northern Taurids occur over a span of two months. When these two showers become simultaneously active in late October, it creates increased fireball activity. Peak night occurs on Nov. 10-11, according to the AMS.

Leonids: Nov. 5-Nov. 30

Leonids are known for causing large meteor storms, with some of the most notable occurring in the mid-1800s, in 1996 and again in 2001. Its peak night occurs Nov. 17-18, Basic Astronomy reported.

Geminids: Dec. 4-Dec. 16

Germanids are usually the strongest meteor shower of the year, and it can also be seen from the Southern Hemisphere. According to Basic Astronomy, Germanids’ peak night takes place Dec. 13-14.

Ursids: Dec. 17-Dec. 23

The AMS underscores that this shower, which occurs just before Christmas, is strictly a Northern Hemisphere stargazing show. Its peak night takes place Dec. 22-23, according to Basic Astronomy.

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Would you believe me if I said I only just remembered that today’s the 5th anniversary of my all-time favorite game? Haha, yup. It’s a bit rushed because of vacation shenanigans, but this is an idea that I had in the back of my head for a long time: a mass-rebirth-meteor-shower shindig. I only wish I had more time to execute on it. Hope you enjoy!

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Meteory.

On some nights it rains meteors!! An image from everyone’s favourite meteor shower, Perseids, (in August) captured multiple streaks over Four Girls Mountain in central China. The bright Pleaides open star cluster appears toward the upper right, while numerous emission nebulas are visible in red, many superposed on the diagonal band of the Milky Way.

Peaking last night and visible until the 17th, asteroid dust is expected to rain down on Earth during the annual Geminids meteor shower. This year, unfortunately, fainter Geminids will be harder to see because of the brightness of the Long Nights Full Moon, which occurs tonight (Wednesday night)!! 

Image Credit & Copyright: Alvin Wu