Mesozoic

Concavenator corcovatus

Early Cretaceous (Barremian Age), Spain

A mid-size (around 6 meter/20 ft) carnivorous dinosaur with a rather strange fin-like structure emerging from its back, made of two elongated vertebral spines in front of the hips. There are several speculative possibilities as to what this structure may have been used for.

Pleased to make this my first new entry for Studio 252MYA - a paleoart collective featuring artists from around the world, including the team behind Earth Archives and Pteros. Check out 252mya.com for more!

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Non-dinosaurian Triassic fauna from Dougal Dixon’s The Very First Dinosaurs. Photo illustrations by Jane Burton.

TOP:  Longisquama and Sharovipteryx

MIDDLE:  Nothosaurus and Tanystropheus

BOTTOM:  Lycaenops and Pareiasaurus

I don’t usually think of Tanystropheus being able to hold its neck at an elevated angle like this.

Extinct Animals of the Cambrian to the Cretaceous!

This will be a limited edition 11x17 print exclusively for sale at spx​ this year!

I love extinct animals, especially lesser-known and non-dinosaur ones. So here are some critters from the Paleozoic through the Mesozoic. Don’t take the period designations too literally, it’s more of a “pretty much around this time” thing, since I couldn’t fit all of them exactly where they should be, scientifically. I’d love to do a sister-image to this with the Cenozoic era!

Here’s a list of the creatures featured!
Cambrian Period
Hallucigenia
Opabinia
Trilobite

Ordovician
Orthoceras

Silurian
Eurypterus
Nektaspida

Devonian
Tiktaalik
Dunkleosteus

Carboniferous
Akmonistion
Pederpes
Arthropleura

Permian
Dimetrodon
Saroctonus

Early Triassic
Erythrosuchus

Middle Triassic
Batrachotomus
Ceresiosaurus

Late Triassic
Oligokyphus

Early Jurassic
Temnodontosaurus

Late Jurassic
Rhamphorhynchus
Pterodactylus
Brachiosaurus
Liopleurodon

Early Cretaceous
Microraptor
Deinonychus
Gobiconodon

Late Cretaceous
Protoceratops
Hesperornis
Corythosaurus

An oil-painting I’ve been working on for a couple of months of this flying reptile gazing from a cliff att sunrise. I have little-to-no experience in pterosaur anatomy and illustrating them so theres bound to be some flaws. Done on a 60x50 cm canvas.

And also, I call jinx on the drink with the same name as the title.

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Acrocanthosaurus atokensis

Early Cretaceous, North America

Acrocanthosaurus was a large theropod dinosaur, with adults measuring nearly 40 feet long. Some fossil footprints in Texas may be attributable to Acrocanthosaurus or a close relative.

The sky is a photo I took; the dinosaur, foreground and most of the vegetation are digital painting. Done in Photoshop CS6 with a Wacom tablet.


[Please don’t copy or use without permission, and thanks for viewing!]