Meso-American

anonymous asked:

Are there any spirits you would never work with, or have available in your shop?

I have a small list on my customs page!  I have a lot of spirits I’ve never worked with, but wouldn’t mind spending some time to get to know to begin offering them.  For example, I hadn’t worked with many Incubi/Succubi, but I had several custom requests for them and I got to know how to work with them very well over time.

There are three categories of spirits I won’t work with:

  1. Those exclusive to another shop, such as Eternus Amici.  They have contracts with their races and it’s rude to breach those, in the same way I would consider it rude if someone else were to offer the Bir’rix.
  2. Culturally appropriative spirits.  As a white person, I am hyper-aware of what is part of cultures I don’t belong to.  Japanese or otherwise Asian spirits are very off-limits to me (Bakeneko, Kitsune, Eastern Dragons, etc.).  South or Meso American spirits are pushing it, but I would eventually like to get some genealogy tests done to see if I am distantly MesoAmerican (I have suspicions about my father’s side of the family).  I offer celestial animals, which are essentially creatures of galactic energy who take the forms of Earth creatures for familiarity.  These are instead of offering real animal spirits, mostly because I feel this is too culturally appropriative to Native Americans.
  3. Spirits that make me uncomfortable. I have yet to really find spirits that give me more than slight heebie-jeebies, but in general I avoid angels. I’ve got nothing against them, but I have absolutely zero interest in ever contacting one.

Also, I would never offer an attachment of a god or other elevated creature, like some shops do.  I’m also not comfortable offering whole “portals” or communities. c:

Thanks for asking!

One of the most shocking things i jave discoevred in my 9 years of philosophy studies was that; all north American and meso american tribes where descendants of africans who had traveled to the americas thousands of years ago! The Olmec/Olmeca where africans who had settled in meso america. The giant head stones found in mexico of the ancestors of aztecs/mayans , clearly show the african features of ; wide noses, big foreheads, big lips. Africans are not here an america because they where here as slaves, THEY WHERE ALREADY HERE!!!!! Power to the people! ✊🏽✊🏽✊🏽✊🏽 #blackhistorymonth #africa #blackpanther #blackpantherparty #mesoamerica #olmeca #tolteca #olmec #toltec #mayan #aztec #realshit #realhistory #fuckhighschoolhistory #elsalvador #cuscatlan #atzlan #fightthepower #freedom #america #amerikkka #thetruth
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The Mexican Kitchen
Thomas Meyer
Genre: Regional & Ethnic
Price: Get
Publish Date: May 21, 2012

History of Mexican Cuisine The history of the Mexican cuisine dates back approximately 10,000 years, to the era in which an estimated maize was domesticated into the crop which was then the food base of Mesoamerican cultures. This remote origin gives Mexican cuisine a unique cover letter in the competition of Nations, that certainly distinguishes it from other culinary collections The cuisine of Mexico is characterized by its great variety of dishes and recipes, as well as the complexity of their development. It is known for its distinctive, sophisticated flavors with great seasoning. It brings together both Meso- american and European culinary traditions among many others. Propose here a description of all the influences that he received the Mexican cuisine, this introduction was to become an endless list of national cuisines. Suffice it to note that Mexican cuisine is no stranger to kitchen: Spanish, Cuban, African, Middle Eastern and Asian, to name a few. On November 16, 2010 Mexican cuisine was recognized, with French cuisine, such as intangible heritage of humanity by UNESCO.

The Gooseberry and Raspberry Patch | smallholding dreams

The Gooseberry and Raspberry Patch | smallholding dreams

External image

by bluebunny01 The other day Henry and I (with help from Jess and Annebel) redeveloped the gooseberry patch. Last year this area was my three sisters Meso-American garden. Once we built the fruit cage I needed somewhere for gooseberries and it got redesignated the gooseberry and raspberry patch. Henry ripped out all the old, collapse….. Source: The Gooseberry and Raspberry Patch | smallholding…

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The Mexican Kitchen
Thomas Meyer
Genre: Regional & Ethnic
Price: Get
Publish Date: May 21, 2012

History of Mexican Cuisine The history of the Mexican cuisine dates back approximately 10,000 years, to the era in which an estimated maize was domesticated into the crop which was then the food base of Mesoamerican cultures. This remote origin gives Mexican cuisine a unique cover letter in the competition of Nations, that certainly distinguishes it from other culinary collections The cuisine of Mexico is characterized by its great variety of dishes and recipes, as well as the complexity of their development. It is known for its distinctive, sophisticated flavors with great seasoning. It brings together both Meso- american and European culinary traditions among many others. Propose here a description of all the influences that he received the Mexican cuisine, this introduction was to become an endless list of national cuisines. Suffice it to note that Mexican cuisine is no stranger to kitchen: Spanish, Cuban, African, Middle Eastern and Asian, to name a few. On November 16, 2010 Mexican cuisine was recognized, with French cuisine, such as intangible heritage of humanity by UNESCO.

Julian Schnabel- 1/28/16

Portrait of Tina Chow, 1987
Oil, plates, bondo on wood

The Patients and the Doctors, 1978
Oil, plates, bondo on wood


Julian Schnabel is a filmmaker, painter, printmaker, and sculptor, most known as a Neo-Expressionist.  As one of the most notable Neo-Expressionists of the 1980s, he countered Minimalist and Conceptual artwork, reintroducing recognizable forms, including the human body, into abstract painting.  He has always been interested in using unconventional materials for his paintings, such as velvet, tarpaulins, and cardboard.  However, his most famous works are his plate paintings (e.g. The Patients and the Doctors, 1978, above).  Other prominent themes in Schnabel’s work are religious iconography from Catholicism and Meso-American religions, and Mexican culture.  

http://www.julianschnabel.com/

http://www.theartstory.org/artist-schnabel-julian.htm

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0773603/