A prayer in Hebrew dating to the 8th or 9th century. This document was found in Dunhuang China, which was China’s gateway to the “Silk Road” during the medieval period. Dunhuang was visited by Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, and other groups, and the caves at Dunhuang have been found to contain documents and art from all of these traditions. 

flickr

Biserica Domnească Sfântul Nicolae/ St. Nicholas Church, Curtea de Argeș, Romania by fusion-of-horizons

anonymous asked:

What are some of your favourite quotes in Old Norse and/or Icelandic?

Sæll (eða sæl), vinur,
(Hello, friend,)

Great question! Here are my three particular favorites:


First, the quote that I try my best to live my life by:

Hávamál, stanza 26, line 1 
(from GKS 2365 4to 3v, line 20):

“Ósnotr maðr þykkist allt vita.”
An unwise man thinks he knows all.

I find this quote of advice to be very important, especially for those actively seeking knowledge on a daily basis. Yet, it is important for everyone to understand, because the world is far too complex for a single person to know everything.


Next up is one of the most powerful statements I have read so far in a saga, partly because I feel that the author’s own words are reaching out to the reader through Njáll Þorgeirsson in this moment:

Brennu-Njáls saga, Njáll Þorgeirsson, chapter 70
(from Möðruvallabók, AM 132 fol. 25v, lines 29-30b):

“…með lögum skal land vart byggja en ólögum eyða.”
…with law our land shall rise, but it will be destroyed with lawlessness.


Lastly, there is the very emotional quote from Guðrún Ósvifsdóttir, which I recently posted about:

Laxdæla saga, Guðrún Ósvifsðóttir, chapter 78
(from Möðruvallabók, AM 132 fol. 194v, lines 32-33b):

“Þeim var ek verst er ek unna mest.”
I was the worst to the one whom I loved the most.

Not only do I find it to be deeply emotional and realistic, but I find it to be a glimpse into the genius and richness of the literary tradition seen in Iceland during this time.


I have a few others, but those are my absolute favorites at the moment. This one also comes pretty close, though, but context does help with its impact:

Brennu-Njáls saga, Höskuldur Hvítanesgoði, chapter 111:
(from Möðruvallabók, AM 132 fol. 39v, line 2a):

“Guð hjálpi mér en fyrirgefi yðr.”
May God help me and forgive you.


Anyway, thanks for asking! I quite enjoyed thinking about what my favorite quotes were so far, and I do hope others enjoy some of them as well!

Með vinsemd og virðingu,
(With friendliness and respect,)
Fjörn

3

The peasantry were starving. The warm summer had left not much room for rain to water the crops and a lot of food dried out because of that. Since King Edmund had locked himself away from all his royal duties, the peasants were left on their own.

“This son of yours is such a wonderful young man. I have so much faith in him when it comes to the safety of the Kingdom, my lord.” Eleanor whispered into the ear of The King.

“He’s a great young man indeed. I have no fear for him as following the throne after me one day.” He agreed.

“But.. There is a but, my Lord. The french wife of his is up to no good. I heard how she feeds the peasantry behind your knowledge. The peasantry will do for themselves, you see. Who is she since she behave above your law and order? Must such an action not be punished?” She whispered softly. He was under her spell, her control.

“I.. But she’s my daughter in law. A Queen to be..” He mumbled and was so very confused. Why was he discussing politics with a woman? He thought.

3

“Father, Thy spend all thy time in your chambers. When will Thy let thy move on? Mother is never coming back and now you must face this reign alone. Please father, we are worried about you.” The Prince of Wales said to his father, Henry.

The King had annulled all his royal duties for months and spent all day in his bed in his privy chambers. No one but the redheaded Lady of far abroad dared go in there.


But the peasants were starving. It looked like the harvest wouldn’t be very good this year and something had to be done.
3

Skyrim leather journal…

Full leather bound blank book is in 8" x 10" (26 x 20 cm) size and thickness around 3 inches (8 cm). Leather is hand toned and aged in dark brown color tone. The front cover plate has specially made map, surrounded with embossed frame and handmade brass corners. Central detail, Skyrim symbol has hand carved from thick leather and hardener with special bookbinder mixtures. The book block has 350 leaves (700 pages) of special, thicker, cream toned vintage paper type in 100 gsm paper weight. Paper edges are gilded and aged.

Nature in her forge

(Roman de la Rose vv. 15897-15905: ‘Nature, whose thoughts were on the things enclosed beneath the sky, had entered her forge, where she was concentrating all her efforts upon the forging of individual creatures to continue the species. For individuals give such life to species that, however much death pursues them, she can never catch up with them.’ – transl. F. Horgan)

Roman de la Rose, Bruges ca. 1490-1500

BL, Harley 4425, fol. 140r

The Ogham Tree Grove.

Ogham is an Early Medieval alphabet used to write the early Irish language (in the so-called “orthodox” inscriptions), and later the Old Irish language (scholastic ogham). According to the High Medieval Bríatharogam, names of various trees can be ascribed to individual letters. According to the Damian McManus, the “Tree Alphabet” idea dates to the Old Irish period. Its origin is probably due to the letters themselves being called feda “trees”, or nin “forking branches” due to their shape. 

The Ogham Trees have been objects of veneration, sources of wisdom, inspiration and medicine for unknown centuries. Each of the twenty British native trees and shrubs has particular powers of its own which may be useful in improving any magical rituals. Each has its own moon cycle span of twenty-eight days and an Ogham letter symbol. There is no definitive proof about the origin of this alphabet, but it can be certain that the Druids, in the late Iron Age and beyond - last century BC and the first and second centuries AD - used this system in the form of a calendar, based on the thirteen cycles of the Moon, and the celebration of the four Solstices. The word ‘Druid’ itself comes either from the Celtic name for the oak - 'duir’ - or from the Welsh - 'derwydd’  - meaning oak-seer.