Media-technology

anonymous asked:

I'm following the cipherhunt and there's already someone from 4chan in the ToM itself, Hyde. They're gonna win this one.

thanks for the heads up! i’ve been seeing this on the discord, but until there’s photos/periscope from Hyde, i’ve got nothing to show from them. if they post anything anywhere, i’ll share it, but so far there hasn’t been that promise.

my goal here (and Alex’s ultimate goal too, i think) is to make cipher hunt as accessible to everyone as possible. it’s an international scavenger hunt with clues and riddles, but Alex definitely took technology/social media into account when he set up the hunt. the most important thing about this group activity is making it available to as many fans as possible.

so if Hyde from 4chan is there, then cool. but they haven’t shared any photos or started periscoping or done anything else to make it accessible to other fans yet. i posted the info for twitter user badonkadank because she’s stated that she’s going to make her search as accessible to other fans as possible. that’s in line with the spirit of the hunt, and it makes it easy for fans who can’t be there, physically or on social media, to understand what’s happening.

if there’s a fear that someone from 4chan will get to the statue first and mess it up (i’ve seen fears like that across the board, not just here) then there’s nothing to be done to control that; we’ll just have to wait and see. ∆

In 1470 Italian Benedictine monk Filippo de Strata published his famous tract, Polemic against Printing, proclaiming, “This is what the printing presses do: they corrupt susceptible hearts…The pen,” he wrote, presumably in longhand, “is a virgin; the printing press is a whore” (Pinsky, 2010, p. 15; Sabev, 2009, p. 177). Father Filippo may have thought highly of the pen, but some 1,800 year earlier, Greek philosopher Plato wasn’t quite convinced about the value of that technology.
theguardian.com
Milo Yiannopoulos, rightwing writer, permanently banned from Twitter
Breitbart writer, who tweeted as @Nero, handed permanent suspension after claims he fanned flames of social media attack on Ghostbusters’ Leslie Jones
By Elle Hunt

Obscenely delusional fuckwit banned from Twitter.

Fellow delusional fuckwits rally to the cause.

“My free speech is being curtailed,” claims man who writes for popular right wing website in interviews with mainstream media outlets.

You can miss me with these Weird Wacky News Stories about people getting injured playing Pokemon Go. People get injured or killed for all sorts of reasons all the time, but we only pay attention to the ones coded as “weird” somehow. What’s weird and what isn’t is entirely a matter of perspective. I think it’s weird how many people have to be injured or killed horribly in car crashes, but nobody laughs about THAT on the radio.

And by the way, unless you have small children, mobility challenges, extremely long commutes, heavy things to transport, or some other things that do not apply to *most* people *most* of the time, then cars are no more necessary or inevitable than Pokemon Go. We’ve just decided to accommodate them to such an extent that other options have become unfeasible in most places.

And you really mean to tell me that before Pokemon Go, no pedestrian has ever been hit by a car because they crossed without noticing the traffic? Nobody has ever carelessly trespassed on private property before? Nobody got dangerously distracted by something while driving? Ok.

youtube

American Gods | First Trailer

“When Shadow Moon is released from prison, he meets the mysterious Mr. Wednesday and a storm begins to brew. Little does Shadow know, this storm will change the course of his entire life. 

Left adrift by the recent, tragic death of his wife, and suddenly hired as Mr. Wednesday’s bodyguard, Shadow finds himself in the center of a world that he struggles to understand. It’s a world where magic is real, where the Old Gods fear both irrelevance and the growing power of the New Gods, like Technology and Media. Mr. Wednesday seeks to build a coalition of Old Gods to defend their existence in this new America, and reclaim some of the influence that they’ve lost. As Shadow travels across the country with Mr. Wednesday, he struggles to accept this new reality, and his place in it.“ 

“American Gods,” is Starz TV adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s beloved fantasy novel.

Get the “American Gods” books here


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roarmag.org
Google’s lemmings: Pokémon go where Silicon Valley says
An analysis of Ingress and Pokémon Go reveals important truths about corporate control and the ability of our mobile phones to organize our desires.

Niantic developed their first major game, Ingress, in 2011. The game, one of the most important of recent years, is a key ideological tool for Google — one that, unlike Pokémon Go, is little publicized. Ingress has seven million or more players and Ingress tattoos show the degree to which people define themselves by the application. Some players even describe Ingress as a “lifestyle” rather than a “game”. The reader can be forgiven for thinking: “I don’t play it, so why would this apply to me?” But the entertainment coming out of Google via Niantic is in line with Google’s wider project of regulating our movements and experiences of the physical world; unless you don’t use Google or any of its applications, many of which come built-it to our phones and cannot be uninstalled, this applies to you.

Ingress reflects a trend of mobile phone application development (which includes Google Maps and Uber, among other well-known apps) designed to regulate and influence our experience of the city, turning the mobile phone into a new kind of unconscious: an ideological force driving our movements while we remain only semi-aware of what propels us and why we are propelled in the directions we are.

What is an algorithm?

By now you’ve probably heard a phrase similar to, “An algorithm controls your news feed,” at some point in the last 10 years or maybe even the last 10 hours. It’s the secret sauce that makes services such as Facebook decide what to show you based on the things you like, people you talk to, news you read, and countless amounts of other data collected to build up your social identity.

But how exactly do they work? Here’s everything you need to know.