Matthew-Robbins

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Dragonslayer (1981)

“First film to use go-motion, a variant of stop-motion animation in which parts of the model (in this case, the dragon) were mechanized and the movement programmed by computer. During shooting, the computer moves the model while the camera is shooting, resulting in motion blur, which makes the animation more convincing.”

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Guillermo del Toro Gómez born October 9, 1964, is a Mexican American film director, screenwriter, producer and novelist. In his filmmaking career, del Toro has alternated between Spanish-language dark fantasy pieces, such as the gothic horror film The Devil’s Backbone (2001), and Pan’s Labyrinth (2006), and more mainstream American action movies, such as the vampire superhero action film Blade II (2002), the supernatural superhero film Hellboy (2004), its sequel Hellboy II: The Golden Army (2008), and the science fiction monster film Pacific Rim (2013). His latest film, The Shape of Water, won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival and is scheduled for an American release on December 8, 2017.

In addition to his directing works, del Toro is a prolific producer, his producing works including acclaimed and successful films such as The Orphanage (2007), Julia’s Eyes (2010), Biutiful (2010), Kung Fu Panda 2 (2011), Puss in Boots (2011), and Mama (2013). He was originally chosen by Peter Jackson to direct The Hobbit films; he left the project due to production problems but was still credited as co-writer for his numerous contributions to the script.

Del Toro’s work is characterised by a strong connection to fairy tales and horror, with an effort to infuse visual or poetic beauty.  He has a lifelong fascination with monsters, which he considers symbols of great power.[3] Del Toro is known for his use of insectile and religious imagery, the themes of Catholicism and celebrating imperfection, underworld and clockwork motifs, practical special effects, dominant amber lighting, and his frequent collaborations with actors Ron Perlman and Doug Jones. He is also friends with fellow Mexican directors Alfonso Cuarón and Alejandro González Iñárritu, collectively known as “The Three Amigos of Cinema”.

When del Toro was about eight years old, he began experimenting with his father’s Super 8 camera, making short films with Planet of the Apes toys and other objects. One short focused on a "serial killer potato” with ambitions of world domination; it murdered del Toro’s mother and brothers before stepping outside and being crushed by a car. Del Toro made about 10 short films before his first feature, including one titled Matilde, but only the last two, Doña Lupe and Geometria, have been made available. He also wrote four and directed five episodes of the cult series La Hora Marcada, along with other Mexican filmmakers such as Emmanuel Lubezki and Alfonso Cuarón.

Del Toro studied special effects and make-up with special-effects artist Dick Smith. He spent 10 years as a special-effects make-up designer and formed his own company, Necropia. He also co-founded the Guadalajara International Film Festival. Later in his directing career, he formed his own production company, the Tequila Gang.

In 1997, at the age of 33, Guillermo was given a $30 million budget from Miramax Films to shoot another film, Mimic. During this time, his father, automotive entrepreneur Federico del Toro, was kidnapped in Guadalajara. Del Toro’s family had to pay twice the amount originally asked. The event prompted del Toro, his parents, and his siblings to move abroad. In an interview with Time magazine, he said this about the kidnapping of his father: “Every day, every week, something happens that reminds me that I am an involuntary exile [from my country]

Del Toro has directed a wide variety of films, from comic book adaptations (Blade II, Hellboy) to historical fantasy and horror films, two of which are set in Spain in the context of the Spanish Civil War under the authoritarian rule of Francisco Franco. These two films, The Devil’s Backbone and Pan’s Labyrinth, are among his most critically acclaimed works. They share similar settings, protagonists and themes with the 1973 Spanish film The Spirit of the Beehive, widely considered to be the finest Spanish film of the 1970s.

Del Toro views the horror genre as inherently political, explaining, "Much like fairy tales, there are two facets of horror. One is pro-institution, which is the most reprehensible type of fairy tale: Don’t wander into the woods, and always obey your parents. The other type of fairy tale is completely anarchic and antiestablishment.”

He is close friends with two other prominent and critically praised Mexican filmmakers Alfonso Cuarón and Alejandro González Iñárritu.[15] The three often influence each other’s directorial decisions, and have been interviewed together by Charlie Rose. Cuarón was one of the producers of Pan’s Labyrinth, while Iñárritu assisted in editing the film.

Del Toro has also contributed to the web series Trailers From Hell.

In April 2008, del Toro was hired by Peter Jackson to direct the live-action film adaptation of J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit. On May 30, 2010, del Toro left the project due to extend delays brought on by MGM’s financial troubles. Although he did not direct the films, he is credited as co-writer in An Unexpected Journey, The Desolation of Smaug and The Battle of the Five Armies.

On June 2, 2009, del Toro’s first novel, The Strain, was released. It is the first part of an apocalyptic vampire trilogy co-authored by del Toro and Chuck Hogan. The second volume, The Fall, was released on September 21, 2010. The final installment, The Night Eternal, followed in October 2011. Del Toro cites writings of Antoine Augustin Calmet, Montague Summers and Bernhardt J. Hurwood among his favourites in the non-literary form about vampires.


On December 9, 2010, del Toro launched Mirada Studios with his long-time cinematographer Guillermo Navarro, director Mathew Cullen and executive producer Javier Jimenez. Mirada was formed in Los Angeles, California to be a collaborative space where they and other filmmakers can work with Mirada’s artists to create and produce projects that span digital production and content for film, television, advertising, interactive and other media. Mirada launched as a sister company to production company Motion Theory.[19]

Del Toro directed Pacific Rim, a science fiction film based on a screenplay by del Toro and Travis Beacham. In the film, giant monsters rise from the Pacific Ocean and attack major cities, leading humans to retaliate with gigantic mecha suits called Jaegers. Del Toro commented, “This is my most un-modest film, this has everything. The scale is enormous and I’m just a big kid having fun.” The film was released on July 12, 2013 and grossed $411 million at the box office.

Del Toro directed “Night Zero”, the pilot episode of The Strain, a vampire horror television series based on the novel trilogy of the same name by del Toro and Chuck Hogan. FX has commissioned the pilot episode, which del Toro scripted with Hogan and was filmed in Toronto in September 2013. FX ordered a thirteen-episode first season for the series on November 19, 2013, and series premiered on July 13, 2014.

After The Strain’s pilot episode, del Toro directed Crimson Peak, a gothic horror film he co-wrote with Matthew Robbins and Lucinda Cox. Del Toro has described the film as “a very set-oriented, classical but at the same time modern take on the ghost story”, citing The Omen, The Exorcist and The Shining as influences. Del Toro also stated, “I think people are getting used to horror subjects done as found footage or B-value budgets. I wanted this to feel like a throwback.” Jessica Chastain, Tom Hiddleston, Mia Wasikowska, and Charlie Hunnam starred in the film. Production began February 2014 in Toronto, with an April 2015 release date initially planned. The studio later pushed the date back to October 2015, to coincide with the Halloween season.[

He was selected to be on the jury for the main competition section of the 2015 Cannes Film Festival.

Del Toro directed the cold-war drama film The Shape of Water, starring Sally Hawkins, Octavia Spencer, and Michael Shannon.[29] Filming was set to begin on August 1, 2016 in Toronto,[30][31] but del Toro confirmed on his personal Twitter account that filming would begin on August 15, 2016.[32] Production was officially announced to have begun on that day and wrapped twelve weeks later, the film is currently in post-production.[33] On August 31, 2017 the movie was screened and premiered in the main competition section of the 74th Venice International Film Festival where it was awarded the Golden Lion for best film, making Del Toro the first mexican director to win the award[34][35].

On July 21, 2016, it was reported that del Toro will retire from producing for projects that he isn’t creating or directing himself.

At the D23 Expo in 2009, his Double Dare You production company and Disney announced a production deal for a line of darker animated films. The label was announced with one original animated project, Trollhunters. However, del Toro moved his deal to DreamWorks in late 2010. Trollhunters was released to great acclaim on Netflix and “is tracking to be its most-watched kids original ever

Sure you’ve seen all the classics; Pretty in Pink, Goonies, Footloose, Heathers, John Hughes’ entire filmography, The list goes on. You’re probably pretty sick of them too, After all, one can only watch Sixteen Candles so many times. As jammed-packed as the 1980s were from all these memorable teen movies and all their not so subtle rip-offs, There were some gems that fell through the cracks of 80s nostalgia.

So here are 5 movies that always seem to be left out of conversation that I personally find in desperate need of more attention.

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Redbeard’s Castle

A Conversation with Screenwriter Matthew Robbins

After spending his junior year in Paris watching movies with Johns Hopkins roommate Walter Murch and graduate film school at USC, Matthew Robbins began his long and distinguished career in screenwriting and directing with contributions to George Lucas’s first feature, THX1138, followed in rapid succession by Sugarland Express with Steven Spielberg, Corvette Summer, The Bingo Traveling All Stars and Motor Kings, Dragonslayer, and batteries not included—a still timely tale of alien gadgets from outer space who put the kibosh on urban gentrification.

In the 1990s, mentoring an up-and-coming young Guadalajaran through a film program in that city led Robbins to a rich collaboration with the director Guillermo del Toro that so far has produced Mimic, the remake of Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark, and Crimson Peak, which was released last month on DVD, and today on Netflix.

From his home in west Marin County Robbins spoke with me about Crimson Peak, the Gothic romance, and a trunkful of movie scripts he and del Toro have yet to make.

—Victoria Nelson

I. REVERSING EXPECTATION

VICTORIA NELSON:  After twenty years of working together, you know Guillermo del Toro very well. What do you feel are the qualities you bring to this relationship that Guillermo doesn’t, and what are the qualities he brings to it that you don’t?

MATTHEW ROBBINS: Guillermo is a master director, a multitalented leader who has a tremendous empathetic way with his actors and command of the camera. His staging is inventive and he’s also fascinated with design and style—he’s got the whole package for leading a big orchestra every day. He also has the gift of having obsessions, which is very useful for a film director. Guillermo’s obsessions [insects, mechanical devices, ghosts, the Gothic, many more] are well enough known that I don’t really have to mention them.

On my side of the fence, it’s always the same thing no matter what genre I’m working in. I try to identify what the movie is about. Is there a theme working in all this detail and set decoration and atmosphere and genre? Is there something nourishing enough in there to merit two hours?

The other area in which I’m very invested is the creation of characters. Do the characters have enough meat on their bones to merit development and hold our interest as people? That’s the foundation of our partnership: I’m always the one who harps on those things; Guillermo’s eyes start to sparkle when he begins to see how he’s going to shoot it and direct it and cut it. We’ve worked on many screenplays, and maybe eight or ten are in his trunk, I’m not sure. He treasures them all and can probably tick them off, not only rapidly but in order; he’s got an amazing memory.

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