Mass-Shootings-in-America

No offense (JK, full offense) but I’m officially done with people arguing that we don’t need gun laws. We need fucking gun laws. How many mass shootings have to happen before people stop and think “huh, what if we didn’t make assault weapons available to the public?” 

There have already been 6 mass shootings in America in 2017. 6. It’s January 6th. That’s appalling and unacceptable. We need gun legislation.

And I don’t want to hear any second amendment bullshit either. The second amendment was developed when people were using fucking muskets. Can you imagine a mass shooting with a musket? Me neither. The founding fathers couldn’t even imagine machine guns and assault weapons in their craziest fever dreams, they didn’t have them in mind when they wrote the amendment. 

I’m just tired of people saying gun legislation in unconstitutional or unnecessary

Let’s pretend, for a moment, that you are a 22-year-old college student in Kampala, Uganda. You’re sitting in class and discreetly scrolling through Facebook on your phone. You see that there has been another mass shooting in America, this time in a place called San Bernardino. You’ve never heard of it. You’ve never been to America. But you’ve certainly heard a lot about gun violence in the U.S. It seems like a new mass shooting happens every week.
You wonder if you could go there and get stricter gun legislation passed. You’d be a hero to the American people, a problem-solver, a lifesaver. How hard could it be? Maybe there’s a fellowship for high-minded people like you to go to America after college and train as social entrepreneurs. You could start the nonprofit organization that ends mass shootings, maybe even win a humanitarian award by the time you are 30.
Sound hopelessly naïve? Maybe even a little deluded? It is. And yet, it’s not much different from how too many Americans think about social change in the “Global South.”
If you asked a 22-year-old American about gun control in this country, she would probably tell you that it’s a lot more complicated than taking some workshops on social entrepreneurship and starting a non-profit. She might tell her counterpart from Kampala about the intractable nature of our legislative branch, the long history of gun culture in this country and its passionate defenders, the complexity of mental illness and its treatment. She would perhaps mention the added complication of agitating for change as an outsider.
But if you ask that same 22-year-old American about some of the most pressing problems in a place like Uganda — rural hunger or girl’s secondary education or homophobia — she might see them as solvable. Maybe even easily solvable.
I’ve begun to think about this trend as the reductive seduction of other people’s problems. It’s not malicious. In many ways, it’s psychologically defensible; we don’t know what we don’t know.
If you’re young, privileged, and interested in creating a life of meaning, of course you’d be attracted to solving problems that seem urgent and readily solvable. Of course you’d want to apply for prestigious fellowships that mark you as an ambitious altruist among your peers. Of course you’d want to fly on planes to exotic locations with, importantly, exotic problems.
There is a whole “industry” set up to nurture these desires and delusions — most notably, the 1.5 million nonprofit organizations registered in the U.S., many of them focused on helping people abroad. In other words, the young American ego doesn’t appear in a vacuum. Its hubris is encouraged through job and internship opportunities, conferences galore, and cultural propaganda — encompassed so fully in the patronizing, dangerously simple phrase “save the world.”
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FREE MASS EFFECT ANDROMEDA

“Other developed countries don’t have mass killings like the U.S.”

Australia

>19 December 2014; Cairns, Australia - 8 children killed in a stabbing attack

>18 November 2011; Sydney, Australia - 11 killed and 20 injured in arson attack at the Quakers Hill Nursing home

>18 July 2009; North Epping, New South Wales, Australia - 5 killed with a blunt instrument

>7 February 2009; Churchill, Victoria, Australia - 10 killed in an arson attack

>23 June 2000; Childers, Queensland, Australia - 15 killed in an arson attack

U.K.

>2 June 2010; Cumbria, England - 12 killed and 11 injured in a mass shooting

>7 July 2005; London, England - 52 killed and over 700 injured in a bombing

>The laundry list of bombings committed mostly by the IRA - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_terrorist_incidents_in_Great_Britain

France

>12 July 1989; Luxiol, France - 14 killed and 8 wounded in a mass shooting

>23-24 September 1995; Sollies-Pont & Cuers - 15 killed and 4 injured by a perpetrator wielding a .22 rifle, a hammer, and baseball bat

>29 October 2001; Tours, France - 4 killed and 7 injured in mass shooting

>27 March 2002; Nanterre, France - 8 killed and 19 wounded in a mass shooting

>7 January 2015; Paris, France - 12 killed and 11 injured in the Carlie Hebdo mass shooting

Germany

>16 May 1999; Dillingen, Germany & Sierck-les-Bains, France - 5 killed and 11 wounded in shooting

>1 November 1999; Bad Reichenhall, Germany - 4 people + 1 cat killed and 7 people wounded

>11 March 2009; Winnenden, Germany - 16 killed and 9 injured in a mass shooting

>19 September 2010; Lorrach, Germany - 4 killed and 18 wounded in a mass shooting


In other words, anti-gunners;

“I do not really understand myself these days. I am supposed to be an average reasonable and intelligent young man. However, lately (I cannot recall when it started) I have been a victim of many unusual and irrational thoughts.”

-Charles Whitman, who shot dead 16 people and wounded a further 32 others in the largest mass shooting in America: The UT Tower Shooting. It was later revealed that the most likely cause for his irrational thoughts was a brain tumor, the size of a pecan, which Whitman had suspected for quite some time. In a note Whitman wrote before the shooting he requested that: “After my death I wish that an autopsy would be performed on me to see if there is any visible physical disorder.” 

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“Yeah. It’s about the culture of mass shooting that happens in America mixed with narcissistic social media. There’s this sort of rage happening, but it’s also now being filmed and we all have ourselves under surveillance. To me, that is so twisted. To get into the brain of someone like that was freaky. It freaked me out. After I wrote it, all I wanted to do was get that out of my brain because it just freaked me out.”– Billie Joe Armstrong