Martin-Brown

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Another reason to love our boys💙

if i learned how to relate to rich white girls going to private school or a white boy with fucking spider powers i know damn well you can relate to poor kids living in the bronx

  • *turns on tv 30 minutes early from scheduled game time*
  • insignificant person: the game doesn't start for another 30 minutes, we have time to change the channel
  • me, shooting a death glare: i gotta watch the warm up, the national anthems (where they show shots of the bench), the video featuring the two teams playing, pre-game interviews, locker room and hallway hype, don't you dare touch the remote

Black Panther Full Cast and Synopsis

“Black Panther” follows T'Challa who, after the events of “Captain America: Civil War,” returns home to the isolated, technologically advanced African nation of Wakanda to take his place as king. However, when an old enemy reappears on the radar, T'Challa’s mettle as king and Black Panther is tested when he is drawn into a conflict that puts the entire fate of Wakanda and the world at risk.

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Some of the dark skinned black actresses suggested for Sana Starros, following the Han Solo prequel casting yet another white brunette as the female lead. Sana’s character is a major player in the prequel comics and the Star Wars franchise is in dire need of WOC leads.

Anna Diop
Karidja Touré
Mya Taylor
Alexandra Grey
Deborah Ayorinde
Yityish Titi Aynaw
Mercy Johnson
Genevieve Nnaji
Roselyn Ngissah
Ahuofe Patri
Gloria Sarfo
Lydia Forson
Jackie Appiah
Simona Brown
Stefanée Martin

How The Systemic Segregation Of Schools Is Maintained By ‘Individual Choices’

Sixty-three years after the Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education ruling mandated the desegregation of American schools, many schools across the country either remain segregated or have re-segregated.

Journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones tells Fresh Air’s Terry Gross that when it comes to school segregation, separate is never truly equal.

“There’s never been a moment in the history of this country where black people who have been isolated from white people have gotten the same resources,” Hannah-Jones says. “They often don’t have the same level of instruction. They often don’t have strong principals. They often don’t have the same technology.”

Still, when it was time for Hannah-Jones’ daughter, Najya, to attend kindergarten, the journalist chose the public school near their home in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, even though its students were almost all poor and black or Latino. Hannah-Jones later wrote about that decision in The New York Times Magazine.

For Hannah-Jones, sending Najya to the neighborhood school was a moral issue. “It is important to understand that the inequality we see, school segregation, is both structural, it is systemic, but it’s also upheld by individual choices,” she says. “As long as individual parents continue to make choices that only benefit their own children … we’re not going to see a change.”

Hannah-Jones adds that her daughter is thriving at school. “I know she’s learning a lot,” she says. “I think it is making her a good citizen. … It is teaching her that children who have less resources than her are not any less intelligent than her or not any less worthy than her.”

Illustration: Michelle Kondrich for NPR