Mark Cowin

NASA Report: Drought Causing Valley Land to Sink

NASA Report: Drought Causing Valley Land to Sink

SACRAMENTO, CA — As Californians continue pumping groundwater in response to the historic drought, the Department of Water Resources today released a new NASA report showing land in the San Joaquin Valley is sinking faster than ever before, nearly two inches per month in some locations. “Because of increased pumping, groundwater levels are reaching record lows—up to 100 feet lower than previous…

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As Groundwater Disappears, California Is Sinking. California Dreamin’ this is not. Sounds pretty freakin’ terrifying actually. From Bloomberg: Land in California’s central valley agricultural region sank more than a foot in just eight months in some places as residents and farmers pump more and more groundwater amid a record drought.   The ground near Corcoran, 173 miles (278 kilometers) north of Los Angeles, dropped about 1.6 inches every 30 days. One area in the Sacramento Valley was descending about half-an-inch per month, faster than previous measurements, according to a report released Wednesday by the Department of Water Resources. NASA completed the study by comparing satellite images of Earth’s surface over time. Groundwater levels are reaching record lows — up to 100 feet lower than previous records,” Mark Cowin, the department’s director, said in a statement. “As extensive groundwater pumping continues, the land is sinking more rapidly and this puts nearby infrastructure at greater risk of costly damage.”   Areas along the California Aqueduct — a system of canals and tunnels that ships water from the north to the south –– sank as much as 12.5 inches, with eight inches of that occurring in just four months of 2014, researchers found. From; http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-08-21/parts-california-have-sunk-over-foot-eight-months-due-drought

California is sinking even faster than scientists had thought, new NASA satellite imagery shows. “Because of increased pumping, groundwater levels are reaching record lows — up to 100 feet (30 meters) lower than previous records,” Mark Cowin, director of California’s Department of Water Resources, said in a statement.

Parts of California Have Sunk Over a Foot in Eight Months Due to Drought

Michael Krieger | Aug 20, 2015

California Dreamin’ this is not.

Sounds pretty freakin’ terrifying actually.

From Bloomberg:

Land in California’s central valley agricultural region sank more than a foot in just eight months in some places as residents and farmers pump more and more groundwater amid a record drought.

The ground near Corcoran, 173 miles (278 kilometers) north of Los Angeles, dropped about 1.6 inches every 30 days.

One area in the Sacramento Valley was descending about half-an-inch per month, faster than previous measurements, according to a report released Wednesday by the Department of Water Resources. NASA completed the study by comparing satellite images of Earth’s surface over time.

“Groundwater levels are reaching record lows — up to 100 feet lower than previous records,” Mark Cowin, the department’s director, said in a statement.

“As extensive groundwater pumping continues, the land is sinking more rapidly and this puts nearby infrastructure at greater risk of costly damage.”

Areas along the California Aqueduct — a system of canals and tunnels that ships water from the north to the south –– sank as much as 12.5 inches, with eight inches of that occurring in just four months of 2014, researchers found.

Get to work Dr. Bernanke.

http://libertyblitzkrieg.com/2015/08/20/parts-of-california-have-sunk-over-a-foot-in-eight-months-due-to-drought/

CLIMATE CHANGE / GLOBAL WARMING IS ALREADY HERE 🔥☀️🌐 #wakeup

A NASA report released on Wednesday stated parts of the San Joaquin Valley in California are sinking due to excessive groundwater pumping as the state deals with a devastating drought. Some areas are experiencing nearly 2 inches (5 cm) of sinking per month, a trend is damaging homes, infrastructure such as bridges, roads and aqueducts, the California Department of Water Resources said in a statement about the report. “Groundwater acts as a savings account to provide supplies during drought, but the NASA report shows the consequences of excessive withdrawals as we head into the fifth year of historic drought,” Department of Water Resources Director Mark Cowin said in the statement. “Because of increased pumping, groundwater levels are reaching record lows - up to 100 feet (30 meters) lower than previous records,” he said.

The department said it would also conduct a system-wide evaluation of subsidence along the California Aqueduct after finding areas in several Central California counties had sunk more than 1.25 feet (38 cm) in two years. The data for NASA’s report, which was prepared for the department, was based on satellite imagery showing changes to the Earth’s surface over time.

#climatechange #globalwarming #drought #motherearth #californiadreaming #caliproblems #westcoast #environmental #environmentalist #surfer #geology #science #nasa #nytimes #cnn #jerrybrown #govegan #vegansofig #vegan #lajolla #manhattanbeach #santacruz #rivers #reservoirs #freshwater #treehugger #agriculture by puravidalivefree http://ift.tt/1TX8Ug1

Agricultural Water Management Plan Guidebook Released by DWR for Water Suppliers’ Use

Agricultural Water Management Plan Guidebook Released by DWR for Water Suppliers’ Use

SACRAMENTO — To help mid-sized farm water districts comply with Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr.’s directive to prepare water management plans, the Department of Water Resources (DWR) has updated its guidebook on preparation of such plans. On Monday, DWR released its final 2015 Agricultural Water Management Plan Guidebook, which farm water districts can use in preparing and submitting their required…

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California drought causing land in the Central Valley to subside faster than ever – Increased pumping drives groundwater levels to record lows – ‘We are pumping at historic levels’

Desdemona Despair 19 August 2015 (JPL) – As Californians continue pumping groundwater in response to the historic drought, the California Department of Water Resources today released a new NASA report showing land in the San Joaquin Valley is sinking faster than ever before, nearly 2 inches (5 centimeters) per month in some locations. The report, Progress Report: Subsidence in the Central Valley, California, prepared for DWR by researchers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is available at: http://water.ca.gov/groundwater/docs/NASA_REPORT.pdf (14 MB) “Because of increased pumping, groundwater levels are reaching record lows – up to 100 feet (30 meters) lower than previous records,” said Department of Water Resources Director Mark Cowin. “As extensive groundwater pumping continues, the land is sinking more rapidly and this puts nearby infrastructure at greater risk of costly damage.” Sinking land, known as subsidence, has occurred for decades in California because of excessive groundwater pumping during drought conditions, but the new NASA data show the sinking is happening faster, putting infrastructure on the surface at growing risk of damage. NASA obtained the subsidence data by comparing satellite images of Earth’s surface over time. http://b4in.com/pT8o

California Sinking Faster Than Thought, Aquifers Could Permanently Shrink

California is sinking even faster than scientists had thought, new NASA satellite imagery shows. “Because of increased pumping, groundwater levels are reaching record lows — up to 100 feet (30 meters) lower than previous records,” Mark Cowin, director of California’s Department of Water Resources, said in a statement. http://dlvr.it/Bx8vGH

DWR: Revised Ordinance Would Cut Water Use by 30 Percent on New Landscapes for Homes and Businesses

SACRAMENTO – New California yards and commercial landscaping would use far less water under the rules of a model landscape ordinance updated by the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) at the direction of Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. The updated draft rules would prohibit installation of turf unless it is used for a specific function such as sports fields or gathering areas, require the…

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California Sinking Faster Than Thought, Aquifers Could Permanently Shrink

Editor’s Note: This story was updated at 2:00 p.m. E.T.

California is sinking even faster than scientists had thought, new NASA satellite imagery shows.

Some areas of the Golden State are sinking more than 2 inches (5.1 centimeters) per month, the imagery reveals. Though the sinking, called subsidence, has long been a problem in California, the rate is accelerating because the state’s extreme drought is fueling voracious groundwater pumping.

“Because of increased pumping, groundwater levels are reaching record lows — up to 100 feet (30 meters) lower than previous records,” Mark Cowin, director of California’s Department of Water Resources, said in a statement. “As extensive groundwater pumping continues, the land is sinking more rapidly, and this puts nearby infrastructure at greater risk of costly damage.” [It’s Raining Spiders! The Weirdest Effects of California’s Drought]

What’s more, this furious groundwater pumping could have long-term consequences. If the land shrinks too much, and for too long, it can permanently lose its ability to store groundwater, the researchers said.

The state’s sinking isn’t new: California has long suffered from subsidence, and some parts are now a few dozen feet lower than they were in 1925, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

But the state’s worst drought on record — 97 percent of the state is facing moderate to exceptional drought — has only accelerated the trend. To quantify this accelerated sinking, researchers at the Department of Water Resources and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, compared satellite imagery of California over time. Thanks to images taken from both satellites and airplanes using a remote-sensing technique called interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), which uses radar to measure elevation differences, researchers can now map changes in the surface height of the ground with incredible precision. For the current study, the team stitched together imagery from Japan’s satellite-based Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar and Canada’s Earth Observation satellite Radarsat-2, as well as NASA’s airplane-based Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar.

Certain hotspots are shrinking at an astonishing rate — regions of the Tulare Basin, which includes Fresno, sank 13 inches (33 cm) in just eight months, they found. The Sacramento Valley is sinking about 0.5 inches (1.3 cm) per month. And the California Aqueduct — an intricate network of pipes, canals and tunnels that funnels water from high in the Sierra Nevada mountains in northern and central California to Southern California — has sunk 12.5 inches (32 cm), and most of that was just in the past four months, according to the new study.

The unquenchable thirst for groundwater in certain regions is largely a result of agriculture: Most of the state’s agricultural production resides in the fast-sinking regions around some of the state’s most endangered river systems — the San Joaquin and Sacramento rivers. As the heat and lack of rainfall have depleted surface-water supplies, farmers have turned to groundwater to keep their crops afloat.

Subsidence isn’t just an aesthetic problem; bridges and highways can sink and crack in dangerous ways, and flood-control structures can be compromised. In the San Joaquin Valley, the sinking Earth has destroyed the outer shell around thousands of privately drilled wells. 

“Groundwater acts as a savings account to provide supplies during drought, but the NASA report shows the consequences of excessive withdrawals as we head into the fifth year of historic drought,” Corwin said. “We will work together with counties, local water districts, and affected communities to identify ways to slow the rate of subsidence and protect vital infrastructure such as canals, pumping stations, bridges and wells.”

Follow Tia Ghose on Twitterand Google+. Follow Live Science @livescience, Facebook & Google+. Original article on Live Science.

Copyright 2015 LiveScience, a Purch company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
Parts Of California Have Sunk Over A Foot In Eight Months Due To Drought
By : Zero Hedge Published on : 8/21/2015 5:15:33 PM

Submitted by Mike Krieger via Liberty Blitzkrieg blog,

California Dreamin this is not.

Sounds pretty freakin terrifying actually. From Bloomberg:

Land in Californias central valley agricultural region sank more than a foot in just eight months in some places as residents and farmers pump more and more groundwater amid a record drought.

The ground near Corcoran, 173 miles (278 kilometers) north of Los Angeles, dropped about 1.6 inches every 30 days. One area in the Sacramento Valley was descending about half-an-inch per month, faster than previous measurements, according to a report released Wednesday by the Department of Water Resources. NASA completed the study by comparing satellite images of Earths surface over time.


Groundwater levels are reaching record lows up to 100 feet lower than previous records, Mark Cowin, the departments director, said in a statement. As extensive groundwater pumping continues, the land is sinking more rapidly and this puts nearby infrastructure at greater risk of costly damage.

Areas along the California Aqueduct a system of canals and tunnels that ships water from the north to the south sank as much as 12.5 inches, with eight inches of that occurring in just four months of 2014, researchers found.


Get to work Mrs Yellen… print some more water…

Bernanke ‘fixed’ the world before!!










Construction Begins on Emergency Drought Barrier in Delta

Temporary Barrier Will Deter Saltwater and Protect Delta Water Quality

SACRAMENTO — The Department of Water Resources (DWR) has begun construction on a temporary emergency drought barrier on West False River in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta after receipt of all necessary state and federal permits for the project. The barrier will help block saltwater from flowing into the central Delta and…

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13. Parts Of California Have Sunk Over A Foot In Eight Months Due To Drought - http://ift.tt/1eKdRiT

Zero Hedge -

Submitted by Mike Krieger via Liberty Blitzkrieg blog,

California Dreamin’ this is not.

Sounds pretty freakin’ terrifying actually. From Bloomberg:

Land in California’s central valley agricultural region sank more than a foot in just eight months in some places as residents and farmers pump more and more groundwater amid a record drought.

The ground near Corcoran, 173 miles (278 kilometers) north of Los Angeles, dropped about 1.6 inches every 30 days. One area in the Sacramento Valley was descending about half-an-inch per month, faster than previous measurements, according to a report released Wednesday by the Department of Water Resources. NASA completed the study by comparing satellite images of Earth’s surface over time.


“Groundwater levels are reaching record lows — up to 100 feet lower than previous records,” Mark Cowin, the department’s director, said in a statement. “As extensive groundwater pumping continues, the land is sinking more rapidly and this puts nearby infrastructure at greater risk of costly damage.”

Areas along the California Aqueduct — a system of canals and tunnels that ships water from the north to the south –– sank as much as 12.5 inches, with eight inches of that occurring in just four months of 2014, researchers found.


Get to work Mrs Yellen… print some more water…

Bernanke ‘fixed’ the world before!!










- http://ift.tt/1fvT3lU
Parts Of California Have Sunk Over A Foot In Eight Months Due To Drought

Submitted by Mike Krieger via Liberty Blitzkrieg blog,

California Dreamin’ this is not.

Sounds pretty freakin’ terrifying actually. From Bloomberg:

Land in California’s central valley agricultural region sank more than a foot in just eight months in some places as residents and farmers pump more and more groundwater amid a record drought.

The ground near Corcoran, 173 miles (278 kilometers) north of Los Angeles, dropped about 1.6 inches every 30 days. One area in the Sacramento Valley was descending about half-an-inch per month, faster than previous measurements, according to a report released Wednesday by the Department of Water Resources. NASA completed the study by comparing satellite images of Earth’s surface over time.


“Groundwater levels are reaching record lows — up to 100 feet lower than previous records,” Mark Cowin, the department’s director, said in a statement. “As extensive groundwater pumping continues, the land is sinking more rapidly and this puts nearby infrastructure at greater risk of costly damage.”

Areas along the California Aqueduct — a system of canals and tunnels that ships water from the north to the south –– sank as much as 12.5 inches, with eight inches of that occurring in just four months of 2014, researchers found.


Get to work Mrs Yellen… print some more water…

Bernanke ‘fixed’ the world before!!












via Zero Hedge http://ift.tt/1fvT3lU
Report: Groundwater pumping in California has land sinking

FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — Vast areas of California’s Central Valley are sinking faster than in the past as massive amounts of groundwater are pumped during the historic drought, state officials said, citing new research by NASA scientists.

They said Wednesday that the data show the ground is sinking nearly two inches each month in some places, putting roads, bridges and vital canals that deliver water throughout the state at growing risk of damage.

Sinking land has occurred for decades in California because of excessive groundwater pumping during dry years, but the new data shows it is happening faster as the state endures its fourth year of drought.

“We are pumping at historic levels,” said Mark Cowin, head of the California Department of Water Resources. He added that groundwater levels are dropping to record levels — up to 100 feet lower than previously recorded.

Scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory did the research using images taken over time from satellites and airplanes.

California is the nation’s leading agriculture state, but drought has put one-fifth more land out of production this year than last year.

Gov. Jerry Brown signed historic legislation last year that requires monitoring of groundwater pumping. However, local officials have until 2020 and in some cases until 2022 to write their management plans, so it could take another decade or two before California has a handle on groundwater use, Cowin said.

“I don’t think we can end overdraft or subsidence overnight,” he said. “We do need to take action.”

Meanwhile, the Department of Water Resources is launching a $10 million program to help counties with stressed groundwater basins to develop or strengthen local ordinances and conservation plans.

The NASA data shows land near the city of Corcoran sank 13 inches in eight months, and part of the California Aqueduct dropped eight inches in four months last year. The aqueduct spans hundreds of miles and provides water to million people and about vast areas of farmland.

Farmers in the Central California Irrigation District have spent $4.5 million to raise the walls on a canal and intend to pay $2.5 million to raise a bridge above the water.

“It’s a vivid picture of what subsidence can do,” said Christopher White, manager of the district that serves 1,900 farmers, who grow tomatoes, cotton, fruit, almonds and other crops in three counties.

Long-term subsidence has already destroyed thousands of public and private groundwater well casings in the San Joaquin Valley. Over time, subsidence can permanently reduce the underground aquifer’s water storage capacity.

Lester Snow, executive director of the California Water Foundation, which promotes water policy, urged more immediate action. He said state and federal officials should also offer local agencies financial incentives to reduce reliance on groundwater.

Investments are also needed in storm water capture during wet winters to offset heavy reliance on groundwater, Snow said.

“As long as this continues, we risk further damage to roads, levees and buildings,” he said. “There is no time to waste.”

Save Our Water Launches New Statewide Public Education Campaign

Keep Saving CA encourages Californians to conserve even more water as snowpack hits record lows

 Sacramento, CA – On the heels of Governor Jerry Brown’s announcement yesterday of the first-ever statewide mandatory water reductions, Save Our Water – California’s conservation education program – is launching Keep Saving CA,a statewide public education campaign to help Californians make lasting and…

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Report: Groundwater pumping in California drought causes land to sink faster than in past
By Scott Smith, The Associated Press

FRESNO, Calif. - Vast areas of California’s Central Valley are sinking faster than in the past as massive amounts of groundwater are pumped during the historic drought, state officials said Wednesday, citing new research by NASA scientists.

The data shows the ground is sinking nearly two inches each month in some places, putting roads, bridges and vital canals that deliver water throughout the state at growing risk of damage.

Sinking land has occurred for decades in California because of excessive groundwater pumping during dry years, but the new data shows it is happening faster as the state endures its fourth year of drought.

“We are pumping at historic levels,” said Mark Cowin, head of the California Department of Water Resources. He added that groundwater levels are dropping to record levels — up to 100 feet lower than previously recorded.

Scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory did the research using images taken over time from satellites and airplanes.

California is the nation’s leading agriculture state, but drought has put one-fifth more land out of production this year than last year.

Gov. Jerry Brown signed historic legislation last year that requires monitoring of groundwater pumping. However, local officials have until 2020 and in some cases until 2022 to write their management plans, so it could take another decade or two before California has a handle on groundwater use, Cowin said.

“I don’t think we can end overdraft or subsidence overnight,” he said. “We do need to take action.”

Meanwhile, the Department of Water Resources is launching a $10 million program to help counties with stressed groundwater basins to develop or strengthen local ordinances and conservation plans.

The NASA data shows land near the city of Corcoran sank 13 inches in eight months, and part of the California Aqueduct dropped eight inches in four months last year. The aqueduct spans hundreds of miles and provides water to million people and about vast areas of farmland.

Farmers in the Central California Irrigation District have spent $4.5 million to raise the walls on a canal and intend to pay $2.5 million to raise a bridge above the water.

“It’s a vivid picture of what subsidence can do,” said Christopher White, manager of the district that serves 1,900 farmers, who grow tomatoes, cotton, fruit, almonds and other crops in three counties.

Long-term subsidence has already destroyed thousands of public and private groundwater well casings in the San Joaquin Valley. Over time, subsidence can permanently reduce the underground aquifer’s water storage capacity.

Lester Snow, executive director of the California Water Foundation, which promotes water policy, urged more immediate action. He said state and federal officials should also offer local agencies financial incentives to reduce reliance on groundwater.

Investments are also needed in storm water capture during wet winters to offset heavy reliance on groundwater, Snow said.

“As long as this continues, we risk further damage to roads, levees and buildings,” he said. “There is no time to waste.”

Report: Groundwater pumping in California has land sinking

FRESNO, Calif. (AP) – Vast areas of California’s Central Valley are sinking faster than in the past as massive amounts of groundwater are pumped during the historic drought, state officials said Wednesday, citing new research by NASA scientists.

The data shows the ground is sinking nearly two inches each month in some places, putting roads, bridges and vital canals that deliver water throughout the state at growing risk of damage.

Sinking land has occurred for decades in California because of excessive groundwater pumping during dry years, but the new data shows it is happening faster as the state endures its fourth year of drought.

“We are pumping at historic levels,” said Mark Cowin, head of the California Department of Water Resources. He added that groundwater levels are dropping to record levels — up to 100 feet lower than previously recorded.

Scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory did the research using images taken over time from satellites and airplanes.

California is the nation’s leading agriculture state, but drought has put one-fifth more land out of production this year than last year.

Gov. Jerry Brown signed historic legislation last year that requires monitoring of groundwater pumping. However, local officials have until 2020 and in some cases until 2022 to write their management plans, so it could take another decade or two before California has a handle on groundwater use, Cowin said.

“I don’t think we can end overdraft or subsidence overnight,” he said. “We do need to take action.”

Meanwhile, the Department of Water Resources is launching a $10 million program to help counties with stressed groundwater basins to develop or strengthen local ordinances and conservation plans.

The NASA data shows land near the city of Corcoran sank 13 inches in eight months, and part of the California Aqueduct dropped eight inches in four months last year. The aqueduct spans hundreds of miles and provides water to million people and about vast areas of farmland.

Farmers in the Central California Irrigation District have spent $4.5 million to raise the walls on a canal and intend to pay $2.5 million to raise a bridge above the water.

“It’s a vivid picture of what subsidence can do,” said Christopher White, manager of the district that serves 1,900 farmers, who grow tomatoes, cotton, fruit, almonds and other crops in three counties.

Long-term subsidence has already destroyed thousands of public and private groundwater well casings in the San Joaquin Valley. Over time, subsidence can permanently reduce the underground aquifer’s water storage capacity.

Lester Snow, executive director of the California Water Foundation, which promotes water policy, urged more immediate action. He said state and federal officials should also offer local agencies financial incentives to reduce reliance on groundwater.

Investments are also needed in storm water capture during wet winters to offset heavy reliance on groundwater, Snow said.

“As long as this continues, we risk further damage to roads, levees and buildings,” he said. “There is no time to waste.”

Groundwater pumping speeding subsidence in Central California: NASA

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Parts of the San Joaquin Valley in Central California are sinking faster than ever due to excessive groundwater pumping as the state deals with a devastating drought, a NASA report released on Wednesday said.
Some areas are experiencing nearly 2 inches (5 cm) of sinking per month, a trend that could damage infrastructure such as bridges, roads and aqueducts, the California Department of Water Resources said in a statement about the report.
The department said long-term sinking has already destroyed thousands of private and public groundwater well casings in the agriculture-dependent valley, adding that over time more sinking could permanently reduce how much water can be stored in the underground aquifer.
“Groundwater acts as a savings account to provide supplies during drought, but the NASA report shows the consequences of excessive withdrawals as we head into the fifth year of
historic drought,” Department of Water Resources Director Mark Cowin said in the statement.
“Because of increased pumping, groundwater levels are reaching record lows - up to 100 feet (30 meters) lower than previous records,” he said.
Land sinking, also known as subsidence, has happened in the state for decades due to groundwater pumping during drought conditions, but NASA’s report showed that the sinking is occurring faster now.
The statement said Governor Jerry Brown’s drought task force will work with communities on how to slow the sinking rate and deal with risks to infrastructure.
The department also said it will launch a $10 million program to bolster conservation.
The department said that program would be funded through the $7.5 billion water bond passed by state voters last November, which was the most significant statewide investment in water supply infrastructure in decades.
The department said it would also conduct a system-wide evaluation of subsidence along the California Aqueduct after finding areas in several Central California counties had sunk more than 1.25 feet (38 cm) in two years.
The data for NASA’s report, which was prepared for the department, was based on satellite imagery showing changes to the Earth’s surface over time.

(Reporting by Curtis Skinner; Editing by Daniel Wallis and Eric Walsh)

California Land Sinking Due To Groundwater Pumping Amid Drought: Report

FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — New research by NASA scientist shows vast areas of California’s Central Valley are sinking faster than previously thought as massive amounts of groundwater are pumped during the historic drought.


The research released Wednesday says that in some places the ground is sinking nearly two inches a month.


Mark Cowin, head of the California Department of Water Resources, says the sinking land is causing costly damage to major canals that deliver water up and down the state.


The report says land near the city of Corcoran sank 13 inches in eight months and part of the California Aqueduct has sunk eight inches in four months last year.


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August 19, 2015 at 11:39PM