Representation of “The Last Supper” in a 12th century manuscript. on Flickr.

Manuscript title: Devotionale Abbatis Ulrici Rösch

Manuscript summary: The devotional book of Abbot Ulrich Rosch of St. Gall contains various prayers, timetables and calendars, is decorated with elaborate initials and was written in the year 1472.

Origin: Wiblingen (Germany)

Period: 15th century

Image source: Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek, Codex 285(1106), p. 179 – Devotionale Abbatis Ulrici Rösch ( www.e-codices.unifr.ch/de/list/one/sbe/0285 )

A medieval manuscript that was peed on by a cat 

Scribe was forced to leave the rest of the page empty, drew a picture of a cat and cursed the creature with the following words:

“Hic non defectus est, sed cattus minxit desuper nocte quadam. Confundatur pessimus cattus qui minxit super librum istum in nocte Daventrie, et consimiliter omnes alii propter illum. Et cavendum valde ne permittantur libri aperti per noctem ubi cattie venire possunt.”

[Here is nothing missing, but a cat urinated on this during a certain night. Cursed be the pesty cat that urinated over this book during the night in Deventer and because of it many others [other cats] too. And beware well not to leave open books at night where cats can come.]

Cologne, Historisches Archiv, G.B. quarto, 249, fol. 68r

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Scene from “Labors of the month April” on Flickr.

APRIL Labors of the month April are generally associated with scenes depicting activities that celebrate the arrival of spring. The scene usually focuses on the flowers showing a man or a woman gathering them in an open scene. They can also be shown standing or seated, often holding a bunch of flowers, or even courting. Sometimes the flowers are stylized and are either “fleur-de-lis” like scrolls, or a branch of a tree. In some cases the scene might also represent a man pruning the vine, typical for the activities related to the “Labors of the month March” .

Link to the “Labors of the months” collection.

Manuscript title: Book of Hours

Origin: Nantes ? (France)

Period: 15th century

Image source: Genève, Bibliothèque de Genève, Ms. lat. 33, p. 4r – Book of Hours ( www.e-codices.unifr.ch/en/bge/lat0033/4r )