In 1863, Jules Verne wrote “Paris in the 20th Century,” a manuscript that predicted glass skyscrapers, submarines, the technology to land on the moon, feminism, and a statistical rise in illegitimate births. His publisher rejected the story because it was unbelievable, so Verne put it in a safe - where it was forgotten until his great-grandson rediscovered in in 1989.

It was one of the first science-fiction novels written by Jules Verne, but because it was lost in a safe for over 125 years, it was the last to be published.

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Children's Doodles Found in Margins of Medieval Manuscript

The margins of a medieval manuscript from a convent in Naples, Italy, are decorated with doodles of what are apparently devils, a farm animal and a person that were likely drawn by children, a new study finds.

Children probably scribbled these doodles on the 14th-century manuscript a few hundred years after the book was made, said the study’s author, Deborah Thorpe, a research fellow at the Centre for Chronic Diseases and Disorders at the University of York in the United Kingdom.

The drawings are a rather serendipitous find; Thorpe discovered them by chance while conducting research for another project.

“I was looking through a database of medieval manuscripts online, and I found images of these beautiful doodles in the margins, and to me they looked like they were done by children,” Thorpe said in a statement. “I thought, ‘This is really interesting, has anyone written anything about this?'’ Read more.

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For my submission to Angelica Alzona & Odera Igbokwe’s “Pepper Breath” zine, I made an illuminated spread about what Digimon meant to me and my relationship to my brother. It was so much fun to work on and I was continuously close to tears at getting to submit work alongside such wonderful people.

If you want to pick up a copy then head over here

There’s too many wonderful artists involved with it to list here, so just go ahead and do yourself a favour by getting a copy already!

Long-Lost Nikola Tesla Drawings Reveal Map To Multiplication.

A recently discovered set of original Nikola Tesla drawings reveal a map to multiplication that contains all numbers in a simple to use system. The drawings were discovered at an antique shop in central Phoenix Arizona by local artist, Abe Zucca. They are believed to have been created during the last years of Tesla’s Free Energy lab, Wardenclyffe.

The manuscript is thought to contain many solutions to unanswered questions about mathematics. The sketches were hidden in a small trunk with numerous other drawings and manuscripts ranging from hand-held technological devices to free-energy systems, many with notes scrawled all over them. Joey Grether had been working on deciphering the system of the Map to Multiplication (Math Spiral) and suggests that the Spiral not only explores Multiplication as an interwoven web, but that it, “offers a comprehensive visual understanding of how all numbers are self-organized into 12 positions of compositability.”

This device allows us to see numbers as patterns, the formation of prime numbers, twin primes, highly composite numbers, multiplication and division, as well as few other systems yet to be discovered. The diagram itself is very intuitive, allowing students to see how numbers all work together based on a spiral with 12 positions. 12, or 12x (multiples of 12) is the most highly composite system, which is why we have 12 months in a year, 12 inches in a foot, 24 hours in a day, etc. 12 can be divided by 2, 3, 4, and 6. So can all multiples of 12. For every 12 numbers there is a chance of 4 numbers being prime. They happen to fall in positions (think clock positions) 5, 7, 11, and 1.

Tesla is known for the quote “If you only knew the magnificence of the 3, 6 and 9, then you would have the key to the universe.” It turns out that when the device is examined, the digital roots of the numbers in positions 3, 6, 9, and 12 constantly repeat the same sequence 3, 6, 9! Is this what Tesla was referring too? The self-organization of numbers and their digital roots? Its hard to say, but Grether seems to think so. “This breakthrough is phenomenal. If we could get students all over the globe to use this technique, to play with it, and help figure out how to use it, we could overcome our cultural aversion to mathematics. Instead of memorizing the multiplication table, we could learn the positions of numbers and have a better understanding of how they work.”

Didn’t get this finished in time for Illustration Friday the other week but oh well, here is my Unicorn!

Scott Keenan, 2015

http://scottkeenanillustration.tumblr.com/

https://www.instagram.com/scottkeenan_/

Isaac Newton's Recipe for Magical 'Philosopher's Stone' Rediscovered

One of Isaac Newton’s 17th-century alchemy manuscripts, buried in a private collection for decades, reveals his recipe for a material thought to be a step toward concocting the magical philosopher’s stone.

The “philosopher’s stone” was a mythical substance that alchemists believed had magical properties and could even help humans achieve immortality.

The manuscript turned up at an auction at Bonhams in Pasadena, California, on Feb. 16, where the Chemical Heritage Foundation (CHF) in Philadelphia bought it. The alchemy text will be available in an online repository for those interested in the history of modern chemistry, according to James Voelkel, the CHF’s curator of rare books. 

The handwritten document contains instructions for making “philosophic” mercury that Newton copied from a text by another known alchemist. Written in Latin, its title translates to “Preparation of the [Sophick] Mercury for the [Philosophers’] Stone by the Antimonial Stellate Regulus of Mars and Luna from the Manuscripts of the American Philosopher." Read more.

This animated illustration depicts Alexander the Great’s horse Bucephalus, made up of 54 or so birds, beasts and fish.

It’s from a 1544 manuscript held by the John Rylands Library in Manchester (Armenian MS 3, fol. 42v), and was in our recent exhibition Armenia: Masterpieces from an Enduring Culture.

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The Codex Borgia / Yoalli Ehecatl is a PostClassic Mexican manuscript which dates from the 13th - 15th centuries. Written in a highly complex pictorial script, the codex recounts the religious beliefs of the Nahua peoples and outlines the ritual behaviors associated with particular calendar dates.

5 Things I’ve I’ve Learned While Writing My First Manuscript

Hello and welcome to my first blog post! I’m Laura – an aspiring writer, as you may have guessed by the title of this post – and I, like many others, have made a lot of horrible mistakes and revelations with my first manuscript. While I’m only halfway through my first draft, being the masochistic, self-embarrassing person that I am, I thought I’d share what those lessons were.

1.      The first line is hard.

It’s even harder when you put all this pressure on it that you really don’t need. It’s just a collection of words, just like the rest of the novel.

Don’t fret.

2.     Don’t go back and edit.

There were so many times when I finished a chapter or a scene and then realized: Shit. That’s not how I mapped that character. Or, oh my god, I just missed out a HUGELY important part of that character’s backstory.

What I’ve learned is that it’s the hardest but the best thing you can do for your novel to just. Keep. Pushing. Through.

You’ve got to grit your teeth and remember that this is what second drafts are for, because if you go back and rewrite something every time you notice a mistake, you’ll never finish the stupid thing.

3.     Outlines can be really fun. Or they can be torture.

This lesson is kind of unavoidable as a newbie writer. If you’ve never outlined your book before, you won’t know what sort of outline you like. So you could get 20,000 words into the story (like me), realize you screwed up your outline because you did it on Word instead of post-it notes, and lose your damn mind.

“Why is everything so disorganized!?” You scream, before slamming your head against the keyboard for the millionth time.

Take a deep breath. Stop writing. Redo your freaking outline.

4.     Finish ALL character construction before you start writing.

I didn’t take this step seriously because I didn’t take my writing seriously in the beginning; it was just something I was dabbling in which I hadn’t done in years.

But if you’re considering writing a novel, you have to finish all your character construction 100% before you can start the novel.

A lot of my characters have half-finished outlines. So sadly, I’m gonna have to take a break from all the fun writing I’ve been doing to map them out halfway through the story.

5.     Don’t be too hard on yourself.

I’m actually pretty good at remembering this lesson, but I think every writer finds it invaluable.

You don’t need to be the next F. Scott Fitzgerald in the writing world to have an incredible work in your hands – or, well, your head.

Remember that it’s okay to make the above mistakes, and many more (seriously, I could list hundreds). Just push the negative thoughts away for a moment, and keep tapping at that keyboard. Good things are bound to come out of it if you work hard enough.

So that’s all I’ve got to say on the subject. I’m sure I’ll have plenty more to talk about once my novel is finished and once I move onto the editing phase for my novel. Thanks for reading this far and I’d love to hear some feedback!

World's Most Mysterious Book to Be 'Cloned'

The Voynich Manuscript, a mysterious book that has frustrated code breakers and linguists for a century, will be “cloned” in 898 copies to help experts decipher it.

A small Spanish publishing company has secured the rights to make exact replicas of the manuscript, which is currently locked away in a vault at Yale University’s Beinecke Library.

The copies will faithfully reflect every stain, hole and sewn-up tear in the parchment.

Pages from the book are already available online, but touching the manuscript is an experience the Internet can’t capture, Juan Jose Garcia, director of the publishing house Siloe, told Agence France-Presse.

“It’s a book that has such an aura of mystery that when you see it for the first time … it fills you with an emotion that is very hard to describe,” Garcia said. Read more.