Manslaughter

for a moment i had a thought like “omg wouldn’t it be so cute and fun if amethyst got jasper into wrestling and they formed a team” but then i realized that would probably quickly end up with Manslaughter 

Drunk driver who killed baby found not guilty of manslaughter—court said 6 day old baby was “not a person yet”

Jennifer Jorgensen was pregnant in her third trimester when she decided to get drunk and the get behind the wheel of a car. She crashed that car and had to have an emergency C-section to deliver the baby. Six days later, the baby died from complications resulting from the crash. A New York court has decided that Jorgensen is not guilty of manslaughter because the 6-day-old was “not a person” at the time of the crash. The court’s decision is completely absurd and completely heinous.

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19-year-old Louise Woodward was a British au pair for the Eappen family from  Boston. On 9 February, 1997, 8-month-old Matthew Eappen died at the Children’s Hospital in Boston. He had succumbed to a fractured skull and subdural hematoma. It was said to be caused by shaken-baby syndrome. Woodward was questioned by authorities and reported that she had “popped the baby on the bed” - a quote that confused authorities. In British English, the word “popped” means “placed”, as in she placed him on the bed, but in American English, it suggested violence. Authorities also claimed that she dropped him on the floor and been “a little rough” with the baby boy, a claim which she staunchly denied. Woodward was arrested and sent to trial for his murder. A pathologist contended that the injuries had to have been caused by a violent shaking and his head hitting off a hard surface. The defence argued that the were no traumatic neck injuries, which would be consistent with being shook violently. The defence also presented testimony from medical experts which reported that this injury possibly occurred at least three weeks before his death, implying that his parents could have caused his death due to negligence. They also noted that there were old wrist injuries that could have been caused long before Woodward even began working for the family. Woodward was charged with second-degree murder on 30 October, 1997. It was later revealed that the jury were split on the charge and those that had wanted an acquittal, were persuaded to accept a conviction. The charge was later reduced to involuntary manslaughter and Woodward’s sentence was reduced to time served and she was released. Following the trial, the lead prosecution revised his opinion and stated that his death was most likely caused by an old injury which is exactly what the defence had argued.

You Can Kill Anyone with Your Car, As Long As You Don’t Really Mean

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On May 29 of last year, Bobby Cann left the Groupon offices in Chicago, where he worked as an editorial tools specialist. Traveling north on his bicycle, he rode up wide, sunny Larrabee Street. As he entered the intersection at Clybourn Avenue, a Mercedes SUV traveling over 50 miles per hour slammed into him from behind. The impact threw Cann into the air. He landed unconscious, blood streaming out of his mouth and his left leg severed. Bystanders, including a registered nurse, rushed to help. Shortly after transport to a nearby hospital, he died.

What makes Cann’s story notable among the 700 or so bicyclists who are hit and killed in America each year is that San Hamel faces charges in Cann’s death. According to a recent report by the League of American Bicyclists, barely one in five drivers who end bicyclists’ lives are charged with a crime. The low prosecution rate isn’t a secret, and has inspired many towonder whether plowing into a cyclist with a car is a low-risk way to commit homicide.

The Cann case is an exception that proves the rule. “The criminal case is sort of about the outrageous nature of what happened,” Todd Smith, a civil attorney for Cann’s family, concedes. “[San Hamel was] driving under the influence on the city streets where things are congested, and [there was] the complete lack of braking of any sort, the enormous impact of a car of thousands of pounds going in excess of 50 miles per hour, hitting just the human body.” San Hamel’s blood alcohol level was 0.127 at the time of the crash.

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Photo via Flickr user rick

Bicyclists who pushed for prosecution also helped the cause. Last summer, over 5,000 people signed a petition asking state’s attorney Anita Alvarez to refuse a plea bargain from San Hamel. Local activist Robert Kastigar, who started the petition, says he believes it encouraged the state to pursue the case. A representative of Chicago advocacy group Active Transportation Alliance says the involvement of activists is likely to influence stiffer sentencing.

Nationwide, incidents like Cann’s often result in misdemeanor charges, tickets, or nothing. Leah Shahum from the San Francisco Bike Coalition told the New York Times last year that her organization does “not know of a single case of a cyclist fatality in which the driver was prosecuted, except for D.U.I. or hit-and-run.” Kristin Smith, also of the SF Coalition, says that “Last year, four people were hit and killed in San Francisco and no charges were ever brought,” including for a collision captured on video that showed the driver was at fault. Last year in New York City, the bike advocacy organization Time’s Up pushed for changes in police investigations of bicyclist deaths by painting chalk body outlines on streets, marked with words familiar from NYPD reports: “No Criminality Suspected.”

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While hundreds of guests celebrated the wedding of Keren and Asaf Dror on the 24th of May 2001, the third floor of the venue suddenly collapsed, killing 23 people and injuring 380, in an event that has come to be known as the Versailles Wedding Hall Disaster.  After investigation, it was revealed that a structural design flaw had caused the collapse, as the third floor of the building was originally intended to be the roof, and as such was unable to support the weight of hundreds of people.  The terrifying moment the floor gives way was caught on camera by a wedding guest, and is available to watch online.  The three owners of the hall, and an engineer involved with the construction of the site, were charged with death by negligence and manslaughter, respectively.

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On 31 December, 1988, married couple Shanta Chervu and Lakshman Rao Chervu, who both worked as respectable physicians, were discovered brutally stabbed to death in their New York home. The crime scene was very sloppy with unidentified fingerprints found all throughout the home, although these fingerprints didn’t match anybody in the fingerprint system. The heinous double murder went unsolved for four years until 25-year-old Paul Cox admitting to the slaying. Cox was a recovering alcoholic who had recently begun to follow the Twelve-stop program on Alcoholics Anonymous. One of these steps asks for an admission “to God, to ourselves and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.” Cox began to confess to his fellow AA members that he believed he may have been responsible for the callous double murder. He said that he had been diagnosed with patricidal and matricidal tendencies and had worried that he had broken into the Chervu home and stabbed them both to death in a drunken haze, believing that they were his parents. He recalled to some members that he found a bloody knife in his house following the murders and had disposed of it. Confidentiality is the foundation of Alcoholics Anonymous but a few of the members that he confessed these fears to went immediately to the police and Cox was apprehended. He was only charged with manslaughter and was sentenced to 16-50 years incarcerated.

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MANSLAUGHTER

A Homestuck video dedicated to the homicidal maniacs we love to hate.

(WARNING: FLASHING LIGHTS)

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While Chante Mallard’s crime was not pre-meditated or planned, it was a particularly cruel case. Mallard was driving under the influence of alcohol and drugs when she struck Gregory Glen Biggs with her car. The force of the impact sent Biggs crashing through her windshield where he became lodged. While this would be enough for most people to stop and seek assistance, this is not what Mallard chose to do. Instead Mallard continued to drive, with Biggs hanging out of her windshield, and went home. She parked her car in her garage and left Biggs trapped and injured, without calling for police or an ambulance.

Biggs died as a result of his injuries an unknown number of hours later, still trapped within the windshield of Mallard’s car, locked in her garage. When Biggs passed away Mallard called a male friend for help, and together with another male acquaintance removed Bigg’s body from her shattered windshield and dumped him in a park. Biggs would then go on to set fire to a part of her car in order to hide the evidence of the impact.

The most tragic aspect of the case is, that had Mallard sought medical attention for Biggs when the accident took place, all experts during the trial agreed that he would have survived his injuries. 

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The Devil’s Daughter:

Kimberly Goyita was only 13 years old when she murdered her 11 year old sister in front of their family’s apartment on February the 2nd, 1981.Goyita fired two shots from her Step-father’s .32 caliber pistol into her younger sister, before calmly walking back into the house and returning the firearm to the dresser drawer in her parent’s room.The Californian teen claimed that “The devil made her do it”.

As reported in an issue of the Palm beach post in 1981, Goyita was said to have watched the 1976 horror cult classic “The Omen” when she was younger, and had become fanatic with the antagonist, Damien, who in the film, kills his family members one by one when they discover that he is the anti-Christ.
Kimberly reportedly had numerous copies of “The Omen” books, as well as copies of the sequels to the movie in her room. She claimed that she believed she was a boy, often using the name “Damien Thorn” as an alias, and said that she was the son of the devil.

A star news article published the same year alleged that Goyita’s mother was believed to have lied on the witness stand; when asked if it was true that she had told friends and family that Kimberly spent a lot of time in her room, performing black magic rituals over black candles and barking and growling like a dog, her mother denied the allegation.

Goyita took a photo of her sister before killing her. She then took two photos of herself, clad in black, following the murder.

World weekly news quoted an unnamed friend of Kimberly’s mother, who claimed that Kimberly had once told her mother that if she were to “Do away” with her and her sister that she’d get away with it, seeing as she was underage.
She was awarded with an involuntary manslaughter charge for her crime.  

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When Martha Lambert disappeared on November 27th, 1985, police initially thought she had ran away. Even though she was only 12, her troubled family had landed her in foster care after allegations of child abuse, and her older brothers had already attempted to escape several times.

When they realized her disappearence might not have been voluntary, they found they had almost nothing to go on. There was only the statement of her older brother David, who was 14 at the time, who said she went out after dinner, refused to tell them where, and was never seen again.

Years passed, until in September 2009, a couple of detectives that were looking into the cold case decided to put some pressure on David, whom they believed was hiding something. After a long interrogation, he confessed that he had accidentally killed his sister after a physical fight that ended with him pushing her among the rubble of the abandoned Florida Memorial College. Martha fell and cracked her skull with a metal spike. Panicking, David buried the body and hid the secret for almost 25 years.

Because David was a minor back then and the statute of limitations had expired, he was not charged. Police was satisfied and closed the case, even though they couldn’t find Martha’s body –there were new constructions around the area– or any evidence to support David’s claims.

Martha’s mother believes her son lied, since he often made up stories for attention. David himself recanted his testimony soon after and claimed he’d only confessed so police would close the case. Feels like one of those cases in which the complete truth will never be known.

George Zimmerman cannot be guilty of manslaughter by committing a merely negligent act or if the killing was either justifiable or excusable homicide. Each of us has a duty to act reasonably toward others. If there is a violation of that duty, without any conscious intention to harm, that violation is negligence.
—  Jury instructions from the George Zimmerman trial • Detailing the nature of the alternate, lesser manslaughter option in the George Zimmerman trial, an option the jury ultimately declined, acquitting Zimmerman minutes ago. source