Lycurgus

Ancient Roman Nanotechnology — The Lycurgus Cup

In the 1950’s the British Museum acquired one of the most amazing archaeological finds from Ancient Rome.  The Lycurgus Cup is a beautiful 1,600 year old goblet crafted from glass by the Ancient Romans.  The cup depicts the punishment of Lycurgus, a mythical king who was ensnared in vines for committing evil acts against the Greek god Dionysus.  The craftsmanship and artwork of the cup are certainly amazing on their own. During the age of the Roman Empire the Romans were master glassmakers, producing some of the finest pieces of glassware in history.   However the Lycurgus cup has one incredible property that goes far beyond traditional glassmaking.  When exposed to light, the cup turns from jade green into a bright, glowing red color.  For decades historians, archaeologists, and scientists had no idea why this occurred or how the Romans made the cup with such light changing properties.  Then in 1990 a small fragment of the cup was examined by scientists under a microscope.  What they discovered is truly amazing.

The Lycurgus cup is not only made of glass, but is impregnated with thousands of small particles of gold and silver.  Each of the gold and silver particles are less than 50 nano-meters in diameter, less than one-one thousandth the size of a grain of table salt.  When the cup is hit with light, electrons belonging to the metal flecks vibrate in ways that alter the color depending on the observer’s position.  What is even more amazing is that the addition of the particles to the glass was no accident or coincidence.  The Romans would have had to have known the exact mixture and density of particles needed to give the cup light changing properties.  This would have been done without the aid of a microscope, without the knowledge of atomic theory, and 1,300 years before Newton’s Theory of Colors.

Today the Lycurgus Cup has profound affects on modern nanotechnology.  After studying the cup, researchers and engineers are looking to adapt the technology for modern purposes.  A researcher from the University of Illinois named Gong Gang Liu is currently working on a device which uses the same technology to diagnose disease.  Another application of the technology is a possible device which can detect dangerous materials being smuggled onto airplanes by terrorists.  

The legacy of Ancient Rome continues.  Arena’s, baths, arches, and  nanotechnology. 

The Lycurgus Cup

This extraordinary cup was probably made in Rome in the 4th century AD. It is the only complete example of a very special type of glass, known as dichroic, which changes colour when held up to the light. The opaque green cup turns to a glowing translucent red when light is shone through it. The glass contains tiny amounts of colloidal gold and silver (nanoparticles), which give it these unusual optical properties.

The cup is also the only figural example of a type of vessel known as a ‘cage-cup’ (or diatretum). It was made by blowing or casting a thick glass blank. This was then cut and ground away until the figures were left in high relief. Sections of the figures are almost standing free and connected only by ‘bridges’ to the surface of the vessel.

The scene on the cup depicts an episode from the myth of Lycurgus, a king of the Thracians (c. 800 BC). A man of violent temper, he attacked the god Dionysus and one of his maenads, Ambrosia. Ambrosia called out to Mother Earth, who transformed her into a vine. She then coiled herself about the king, and held him captive. The cup shows this moment when Lycurgus is entrapped by the branches of the vine, while Dionysus, Pan and a satyr torment him for his evil behaviour.

The theme of this myth – the triumph of Dionysus over Lycurgus – might have been chosen to refer to a contemporary political event, the defeat of the emperor Licinius (r. AD 308–324) by Constantine in AD 324.

The cup was bought by the Museum in 1958 from Victor, Lord Rothschild for £20,000. The cup is usually on display in Room 41, but from June 2015 will appear in a special case in the new gallery Room 2a, housing the Waddesdon Bequest.

You can read more about this astonishing cup in this blog post by British Museum Curator Belinda Crerar.

2

The Lycurgus Cup

Late Roman, 4th century AD

“This extraordinary cup is the only complete example of a very special type of glass, known as dichroic, which changes colour when held up to the light. The opaque green cup turns to a glowing translucent red when light is shone through it. The glass contains tiny amounts of colloidal gold and silver, which give it these unusual optical properties.”

Source: British Museum

Roman nanotechnology inspires next-generation holograms for information storage

The Lycurgus Cup is a 1,600-year-old Roman chalice that changes colour depending on the direction of the light upon it, caused by tiny nanoparticles of gold and silver embedded in the glass. Now scientists are using the same technology to develop holograms that can double the amount of information stored in digital optical devices.

Read more …

Lycurgus, driven mad by Dionysos, attacks his wife. Name-piece of the Lycurgus Painter, 350-340 BC. British Museum.
In Greek mythology, Lycurgus (also Lykurgos, Lykourgos) was the king of the Edoni in Thrace, son of Dryas, the “oak”, and father of a son whose name was also Dryas. He banned the cult of Dionysus. When Lycurgus heard that Dionysus was in his kingdom, he imprisoned Dionysus’s followers, the Maenads, or drove them and Dionysus out of Thrace with an ox-goad. Dionysus fled, taking refuge in the undersea grotto of Thetis the sea nymph.

The compiler of Bibliotheke (3.5.1) says that as punishment, Dionysus drove Lycurgus insane. In his madness, Lycurgus mistook his son for a mature trunk of ivy, which is holy to Dionysus, and killed him, pruning away his nose and ears, fingers and toes. Consequently, the land of Thrace dried up in horror. Dionysus decreed that the land would stay dry and barren as long as Lycurgus was left unpunished for his injustice, so his people bound him and flung him to man-eating horses on Mount Pangaeüs. However, another version of the tale, transmitted in Servius’s commentary on Aeneid 3.14 and Hyginus in his Fabulae 132, records that Lycurgus cut off his own foot when he meant to cut down a vine of ivy. With Lycurgus dead, Dionysus lifted the curse.

PENTHEUS' BFF

REMEMBER PENTHEUS? THE ASSHOLE WHO DIDN’T LIKE DIONYSUS? WELL, HE HAD A FUCKING BFF. LYCURGUS (NOT THE LEGAL DICKFACE FROM ATHENS) WENT AND FUCKING BANNED THE WORSHIP OF DIONYSUS. MEGA STUPID IDEA.

DIONYSUS MADE HIM GO CRAZY. NOT JUST ANY KIND OF CRAZY - EXTREME GARDENING CRAZY. HE THOUGHT HIS LITTLE SON WAS SOME FUCKING IVY SO HE PRUNED HIS FUCKING FACE. 

HE THEN GOT SHITFACED DRUNK AND WENT MORE CRAZY, TRIED TO RAPE HIS MOTHER THEN HE GOT EVEN CRAZIER AND KILLED HER AND HIS OTHER CHILDREN. 

DIONYSUS EVENTUALLY GOT BORED OF FUCKING WITH THIS ASSHOLE AND MADE HIM GET EATEN BY FUCKING PANTHERS. DO NOT FUCK WITH DIONYSUS. EVER. 

youtube

The Lycurgus Cup in the British Museum

(Ancient Art Podcast 58 by Lucas Livingston)

Hence it was natural for them [Spartan women] to think and speak as Gorgo, for example, the wife of Leonidas, is said to have done, when some foreign lady, as it would seem, told her that the women of Lacedaemon [a regional unit of Greece including Sparta] were the only women in the world who could rule men; ‘With good reason,’ she said, 'for we are the only women who bring forth men.’
—  PlutarchLycurgus
Henk de trainer, maar vooral de mens

Soms zit je op je gemakje te filosoferen over wie je bent en waarom dat dan zo is. En zonder nu direct heel erg diep op alles in het verleden in te gaan bracht die gedachtengang mij bij het plezier voor het allesomvattende voetbal. Er kwam plots iemand in me op die echt ontzettend veel voor mij en mijn passie betekent heeft, als voetballer maar vooral ook als opgroeiend kind. Ik besloot aarzelend om zijn naam eens voorzichtig te googelen om er vervolgens tot mijn verbazing achter te komen dat hij gewoon nog altijd zijn bestaan als trainer leeft. ‘Verdikkeme, dat SV Lycurgus F8 oet stad heeft me toch een portie geluk met de beste man voor de groep.’ Een combinatie van jaloezie en gunnen maakte zich onmiddellijk van mij meester, want natuurlijk vind ik het geweldig voor die lieve kids, en voor hem zelf niet minder. Hij was dé trainer die mij destijds na een voor mij verschrikkelijk jaar in de D1 van GVAV Rapiditas het plezier en geluk terugbracht in het voetbal en tot ver daarbuiten. De trainer die de tot onzekerheid veroverde Jeroen weer een glimlach op diens met sproeten bedolven gezichtje toverde.

Henk Lollinga

Henk Lollinga was in mijn ogen een al wat oudere trainer met een ietwat gebogen houding en dito loopje. In zijn iets te grote Beltona jas zette hij de pionnetjes klaar bij -2 graden. Een man die, tenminste in mijn herinnering, zelfs het woord ‘grip’ zo uitsprak dat het doorleeft en doordrenkt was met voetbal. Je zag aan zijn gezicht dat hij genoot wanneer hij zag dat wij genoten. Hij bewees me in tegenstelling tot mijn overdreven gedreven trainer van het seizoen ervoor dat je op een veel zachtaardigere wijze minstens evenveel teweeg kon brengen. Ik kan niet eens een poging doen te beschrijven hoe de bevestiging van een aai over de bol van hem aanvoelde. Bij sommige mensen in je leven heb je dat, van je opa, je vader, je leraar en dus ook, je trainer. Je hebt die mensen nodig en hoopt dat ze jou ook ergens zo nodig hebben of hebben gehad. Sommige mensen raken in de vergetelheid, en sommige blijven er toe doen. Hij maakte iets moeilijks mee en ik kan het me nog herinneren als de dag van vandaag, ik voelde mee en kan het nog altijd voelen. Het blijft omdat je wil dat het blijft, het maakt ergens een deel uit van je leven. Dat gaat veel verder dan voetbal alleen zo blijkt nu.

Ooit was ik op veel latere leeftijd als gast aanwezig op een feestje die gevierd werd in het clubgebouw van rivaal FC Lewenborg. Daar zag ik een man die enige gelijkenis met mijn vroegere trainer Lollinga had. Na wat biertjes besloot ik om de stoute schoenen aan te trekken en op de beste man af te stappen. ‘Of ik Henk Lollinga ken..? Jawel, dat is mijn broer’ Tenminste, of deze anekdote helemaal sluitend is wat betreft de relatie met mijn oude trainer valt te betwisten na het genuttigde aantal biertjes maar volgens mij zit ik er niet gekke ver naast. Het was in ieder geval familie, dat weet ik dan wel weer zeker. Ook dat ik vervolgens niet heel best wist wat nu te zeggen, daarom besloot ik na enkele niet al te veel zeggende woorden te hebben gewisseld weer verder te gaan tot de orde van de dag. Echter bleef de onrust mij bestoken en wilde ik deze kans om nog eens zo dichtbij mijn oude vriend te komen niet ongemoeid laten en besloot om ergens een stukje papier en een pen vandaan te vissen. Daarop besloot ik een boodschap voor de oude Lollinga te schrijven en deze te overhandigen aan diens broer met de vraag of die het dan weer aan Henk wilde geven en zo geschiedde. Ik weet tot mijn eigen schaamte niet meer wat ik erop heb gezet maar kan het wel zo ongeveer raden. Of hij het gehad heeft weet ik eigenlijk ook helemaal niet, ik hoop het.

Ik wil hier heel veel over de trainer schrijven maar de lofzang zal nooit echt recht doen aan de mens erachter. Ik wil het hier graag bij laten, ik hoop dat hij ook dit lezen zal en een vorm van trots zal voelen, voor mij is het niet niks. Mede door hem ben ik wie ik vandaag ben, en misschien de toppers van Lycurgus F8 over een jaar of twintig ook wel, dat zou mooi zijn…

Het ga je goed trainer, maar vooral mens, Liefs,

Jeroen

Lycurgus Cup

The ‘Lycurgus Cup’ depicts the death of the mythical King Lycurgus, who interrupted the secret rites of the god Dionysus and his followers. Lycurgus is shown entangled in a vine, which trapped and strangled him. The cup has the rare property of dichroism, appearing pea-green in reflected light, and deep red when light shines through it.

Glass: A Short History by David Whitehouse, 2012.