Long-Beard

I feel like the sheer goofiness of the Wild Magic Surge mechanic in D&D isn’t appreciated nearly enough. If you’re a sorcerer and choose the Wild Magic origin, you have some teeny problems controlling your magic, so that any time you cast a sorcerer spell, the DM can make you roll a d20 to see if you get a Surge. If you roll a one, it’s Surge time, and you have to roll a 1d100 to see what the heck has just happened to you. 

Highlights from the list of 50 possible effects:

  • You grow a long beard made of feathers that remains until you sneeze, at which point the feathers explode out from your face.
  • You cast grease centered on yourself.
  • 1d6 flumphs controlled by the DM appear in unoccupied spaces within 60 feet of you and are frightened of you. They vanish after 1 minute.
  • You turn into a potted plant until the start of your next turn. While a plant, you are incapacitated and have vulnerability to all damage. If you drop to 0 hit points, your pot breaks, and your form reverts.
  • You can’t speak for the next minute. Whenever you try, pink bubbles float out of your mouth.
  • For the next minute, you must shout when you speak.
  • You cast polymorph on yourself. If you fail the saving throw, you turn into a sheep for the spell’s duration.

I mean, it’s funny enough to picture a brand-new level 1 adventurer accidentally spitting out these super-powerful spells, but just imagine an epic-level sorcerer in the middle of a world-ending confrontation accidentally turning themself into a potted plant that takes double damage. Incredible.

2

“Odin was the chief ruler of the gods. He was tall and old, and his aspect was wise and reverend. White was his beard and long, and he seemed ever to brood deeply over the mysteries of life and death. He had but one eye, because the other he sacrificed so that he might be dowered with great wisdom.” - Donald A. Machenzie / Teutonic Myth and Legend.

curlzformetal  asked:

how does one draw beards, besides selling their soul to Satan?

no soul-selling! it’s pretty simple

well, what i’m gonna show you is pretty simple

so let’s take these baby-faces:

having the jawline/chin/etc down pretty accurate is important! because the beard grows from there!

dudes all have a specific growth pattern on their face. when doing a 5 o’clock shadow, you can pretty much just follow that and fill it in with a gray/their hair color at a low opacity

with the growth pattern and jawlines and mind, it’s pretty easy to make a readable beard by doing little lines that follow those patterns! i never do a straight line to draw beards. it’s an option, but it’s tough to make look natural lol–i don’t even do that for comics! but once the hairs are curved along the jawline, i think getting rid of the visible jawline helps show thickness/structure to the beard itself

as beards get longer, you can lengthen the lines and make them have more minds of their own, as they begin to stop conforming with the face!

so that’s about it. if you want beards with a little more texture, remember that beards grow in layers. they grow just like hair! but…on..on the face.

as a beard might.

4

       At the end of the second week in September a cart came in through Bywater from the direction of the Brandywine Bridge in broad daylight. An old man was driving it all alone. He wore a tall pointed blue hat, a long grey cloak, and a silver scarf. He had a long white beard and bushy eyebrows that stuck out beyond the brim of his hat. Small hobbit-children ran after the cart all through Hobbiton and right up the hill. It had a cargo of fireworks, as they rightly guessed. At Bilbo’s front door the old man began to unload: there were great bundles of fireworks of all sorts and shapes, each labelled with a large red G and the elf-rune. 
      That was Gandalf’s mark, of course, and the old man was Gandalf the Wizard […].