Library collection

The Octavia E. Butler exhibition is now on view!!

“Octavia E. Butler: Telling My Stories” runs through Aug. 7, 2017, in the West Hall of the Library and puts on view approximately 100 items—letters, photographs, handwritten affirmations, and first editions of her books, and more—from the Butler literary archive, which came to The Huntington in 2008.

pictured: Octavia E. Butler, notes on writing, “Tell stories filled with facts…” ca. 1970-1995. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Copyright Estate of Octavia E. Butler.

In March of 1907, Congress passed the Expatriation Act, which decreed, among other things, that U.S. women who married non-citizens were no longer Americans. If their husband later became a naturalized citizen, they could go through the naturalization process to regain citizenship.

But none of these rules applied to American men when they chose a spouse.

That Time American Women Lost Their Citizenship Because They Married Foreigners

Image: George Grantham Bain Collection/Library of Congress

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Now my room is actually somewhat tidy I can finally take some photos of the finished bookshelf! Awkward angles are awkward because there’s not enough space in my room to stand back far enough.

I’d love to go into details about everything, but we’ll genuinely be here forever. Just know that I like young adult books, am a weeaboo (hence the manga, figures, and obsessive Gurren Lagann collection), am a nerd (hence the Harry Potter lego, comic shelf and Doctor Who shelf), like Final Fantasy, Zelda and Vocaloid (if you didn’t notice the figures and artbooks/strategy guides) and also really really like art books and Japan in general. Also notice the special Alice in Wonderland dedicated shelf.

I don’t want to think about how much this all cost…

Harry Potter and the Dissertations of Phenomenal Curiosity

Neither Harry Potter nor JK Rowling need any kind of introduction, much less here on Tumblr, so we can pretty much rush ahead. Suffice to say, Rowling’s is a series of books so magical and transportive that when it was adapted for the silver screen, Duke Humfrey’s Library at the Old Bodleian was enlisted to play the reading room and the Divinity School became Hogwarts’ hospital wing. 

Today marks twenty years since the first publication of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, the book that started both a literary phenomenon and pop culture tidal wave. By way of wishing The Boy Who Lived a happy birthday, we decided to take a look at the Bodleian Libraries’ archives, collections and catalogues for all things Potter. Maybe the most amazing thing we found was the volume of dissertations that Harry Potter has inspired or influenced in just two decades.

Bodleian readers have access right now to over 165 different dissertations that name Harry Potter in their titles, and over 4,000 more that reference the Potter books or films as part of their arguments.

Here are just a few of these dissertations titles, chosen almost at random, to give you a hint of how many academic thoughts Potter has become entangled with along the way.

  • The Hero’s Journey Through Adolescence: A Jungian Archetypal Analysis of Harry Potter.
  • “All was well”: Harry Potter in the medievalist tradition.
  • Harry Potter and the moral spectrum of care: Using feminist care ethics to analyze morality.
  • Boarding a train: An exploration of the afterlife in Harry Potter.
  • Transfiguration maxima!: Harry Potter and the complexities of filmic adaptation.
  • A flawed father: downplaying fatherhood through the character of James Potter in Harry Potter.

By comparison, the same search for Star Wars yields only 31 dissertations, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer only 22.

When it comes to casting entrancing enchantments on the brightest and the best, it seems like the boy wizard is in a class of his own.

Here’s an adorable marginal caterpillar from our early sixteenth-century processional for your #ManuscriptMonday this week. MU Ellis Special Collections Rare Vault BX2032 .A2 1510z 

We’re thrilled to announce that we’ve received a major donation of Edward Hopper archival materials! The materials, to be known as the Sanborn Hopper Archive at the Whitney Museum of American Art, are the generous gift of the Arthayer R. Sanborn Hopper Collection Trust and will be housed at the Whitney’s Frances Mulhall Achilles Library. The gift consists of about 4,000 items including more than 300 letters and notes from Hopper to his family, friends, and colleagues, 21 notebooks in Hopper’s own hand, and 90 notebooks by Hopper’s wife, Josephine Nivison Hopper, as well as extensive archival material relating to Hopper’s artistic career and personal life, such as photographs, personal papers, and dealer records. This collection exemplifies the long-standing commitment the Whitney has made to the work of Edward Hopper, a relationship that began in 1920, when the Whitney Studio Club, the forerunner to the Museum, gave him his first solo exhibition. Since the founding of the Museum in 1930, the Whitney has exhibited Hopper’s work more than that of any other artist. The Sanborn Hopper Archive will strengthen the Whitney’s extensive holdings relating to Hopper, which already includes over 3,000 works of art—the foremost collection of Hoppers in the world—as well as over 80 linear feet of research material in the Edward and Josephine Hopper Research Collection. 

[Edward Hopper’s “Notes on Painting” notebook (cover), c. 1940-1950, The Sanborn Hopper Archive at the Whitney Museum of American Art, Frances Mulhall Achilles Library, Gift of The Arthayer R. Sanborn Hopper Collection Trust, Series: Personal Papers, Edward Hopper, Notebooks]