Lens-Light

Markiplier, his autograph session.

PAX West 2017: Autograph session with Wade and Tyler

Unfortunately I don’t have a lot of photos and all were taken with the long lens at low light.  The emphasis was on the fans (as it should be) and we (photographers) were asked to stay back.  I want to thank those allowed us to stay for the time we had.

I hope everyone that was able to go enjoyed themselves!!

Please do not edit or repost. Thank you

koddasoda  asked:

Do you still go on iscribble? I think i've watched every speed paint you have up there and they're so mesmerizing. I love how they go from just blobs of colour and value into these epic compositions. I envy your storytelling and would love to know what would be best in terms of giving art more "umph" or feeling? The comic you did with Orianna and Blitz or the one with Kindred and Soraka, they're FULL of emotion and always make me feel something. Love you art to death :)

Hiya! I pop on iS every now and then, but I don’t use it for sketching anymore.. the new HTML shift kinda changed the feel of its response, and I’m just more comfortable working in Photoshop. Glad you like the replays though, it’s a great feature for sure.

There are multiple things that contribute to storytelling in an illustration/comic: Frame composition, shapes within the frame, camera lens, camera position, lighting, colour, props/background. And then there’s the characters themselves with body language, gesture and expression(acting). Alot of this study is closely tied to cinema!

Pushing for emotional impact often rely on camera placement and framing/shot size to ‘put you in the moment’ or ‘in someone’s shoes’. Colour and value(and every other element/principle of art) helps direct your eye and can enhance the emotions even more.

Book recommendations!!!!!  

  • Framed Ink : Drawing and Composition for Visual Storytellers, Marcos Mateu-Mestre
  • The Visual Story: Creating the Visual Structure of Film, TV and Digital Media, Bruce Block
  • Cinematic Storytelling: The 100 Most Powerful Film Conventions Every Filmmaker Must Know, Jennifer Van Sijill

What I like to first do when working on a scene is to decide what part of the story/moment appeals to me the most, then work toward selling that scene. It’s a highly subjective process and everyone has their personal way of composing from the same idea, the challenge comes in leaving a strongest impression.

The Blitz/Ori comic was really bare- simple render/lighting, no backgrounds, alot of close-ups. But its simplicity helped immerse you in the scene more, since the characters and their emotion(or lack of) are the focus of the story. (but this doesn’t work all the time, context is very important). The frames lead the viewer’s eye, and you have to be conscious of what visual information you’re putting in(or leaving out).

I left the general palette muted and dull to synergize with the mood, and let the colour blue be the contrast colour of the light(life). I’m not always aware of what I’m doing, but the more you understand what you need, the more you can design your work to be successful.

I can’t tell you how to UMPH a piece of art in the best way- there are only multiple variations with different focuses. Build your own visual library of artwork like illustrations or screenshots from film/comics that you find interesting. Learn the conventions that artists use by breaking down an image to its elements. You’ll start seeing patterns everywhere. And if that’s difficult, just look around online for blogs/tutorials/studies where smart people explain the thing for you.

Good luck! Practice alot! And constantly ask friends/people for feedback. They don’t have to offer fullblown critique- they’re just as valuable for telling you that ‘they don’t understand what something is’ or ‘something feels off’ or if their response is opposite of what you hoped to achieve.

10

Ask Ethan: Why don’t we build a telescope without mirrors or lenses?

“Why do we need a lens and a mirror to make a telescope now that we have CCD sensors? Instead of having a 10m mirror and lens that focus the light on a small sensor, why not have a 10m sensor instead?”

Every time you shine light through a lens or reflect it off of a mirror, no matter how good it is, a portion of your light gets lost. Today’s largest, most powerful telescopes don’t even simply have a primary mirror, but secondary, tertiary, even quaternary or higher mirrors, and each of those reflections means less light to derive your data from. As CCDs and other digital devices are far more efficient than anything else, why couldn’t we simply replace the primary mirror with a CCD array to collect and measure the light? It seems like a brilliant idea on the surface, and it would, in fact, gather significantly more light over the same collecting area. True, CCDs are more expensive, and there are technical challenges as far as applying filters and aligning the array properly. But there’s a fundamental problem if you don’t use a mirror or lens at all that may turn out to be a dealbreaker: CCDs without lenses or mirrors are incapable of measuring the direction light is coming from. A star or galaxy would appear equally on all portions of your CCD array at once, giving you just a bright, white-light image on every single CCD pixel.

It’s a remarkable idea, but there’s a good physical reason why it won’t pan out. For the foreseeable future, we still need optics to make a telescope! Find out why on this week’s Ask Ethan.

Cephalopod eyes are fascinating. Just like us vertebrates they have camera-type eyes, a hollow liquid-filled chamber with an opening, the iris, and a lens through which light enters and is projected onto the photosensitive surface, the retina. Despite their similarities, vertebrate and cephalopod camera-type eyes have different origins and evolved independently. There are some striking differences that highlight this:

Unlike us, the photoreceptor cells of cephalopods point outwards towards the source of the light rather than inwards. This not only means the we have “inverted” retinas, it also means that cephalopods don’t have a blind spot because the nerve fibers that transmit the visual impulses from the retina to the brain collect and exit the eye behind the retina rather than in front of it. The developmental origins of the eye tissues are also different. For instance, in vertebrates the complex layers of the retina develop from nerve tissue, while the lens develops from skin tissue. In cephalopods both tissues develop from progenitor skin cells.

Cephalopods have excellent vision, and use complex visual cues to communicate with each other, camouflage themselves, and send signals to their environment. To do this they use highly adaptible pigment-filled cells in their skin called chromatophores. The capricorn night octopus (Callistoctopus alpheus) in the photo looks blue, but if it would open all its chromatophores it would turn deep red with bright white polka dots.

Photo credit: David Liittschwager, National Geographic.

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AOS Fic - The First Night

McKirk, ‘cause it’s always McKirk


Jim wakes to a stirring of the mattress.

“B’nes?” he mumbles, lazily cocking one eye open and edging awkwardly to Bones’ side of the bed.

“Dad?” a small voice just dares to breathe. Tiny hands brush hesitantly against the edge of the bed, reaching, searching. “Daddy?”

Jo’s voice is small, strained in the darkness, almost as if she’s trying to mask her tears or calm the tremble in her jaw. 

Jim sits up now, shaking off the last remnants of a dream -  fireworks and soft kisses under the night sky - and orders, “Lights, ten percent.”

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Prettiest // Jeon Jungkook

Pt. 1

the prompt: better view part 2 please??

words: 893

category: fluff

author note: more fond and flustered kookie 4 u i honestly don’t think this is my best work but oh well

- destinee

Originally posted by nevermindmyg

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