Laser-Sintering

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DXV - 3D-printed faucets by American Standard

Using a cutting-edge process called ‘laser sintering’, American plumbing manufacturers American Standard have created their DXV line… a range of elaborate metal taps that allow for a new way to present water. The designs are geometric abstractions of the traditional tap design; splitting up their lengths or simply fracturing into multiple openings at their height. 

I think my favourite has to be the first one pictured above. I really like the layering of individual apertures so the individual flows become one as they fall. 

Images sourced from: designboom

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derby was born without his front paws and small forelegs. when his first owners proved unable to sufficiently care for him, derby was given to peace and paws dog rescue in new hampshire, where, with a stroke of luck, he was spotted by tara anderson, who works for 3D systems as director of product management.

while the team worked to developed prosthetics for derby, he first used a cart which, while an improvement, limited his mobility. eventually a preliminary set of prosthetic legs were designed, though they kept him intentionally low to the ground so that he could properly transition to walking with a fully straight back. 

and once accustomed to his prosthetics, and after much trial and error on the part of 3D systems, a new set of legs was designed that now allow him to both walk with a straight back and sit like a normal dog. 

the prosthetics were made from nylon, which closely mimics the flexible properties you would find in a natural knee, and created using selective laser sintering, a technique that uses heat from a high power laser to fuse together particles into three dimensional forms. 

by Txchnologist Staff

Laser sintering is 3-D printing on steroids. The process is another form of additive manufacturing that shoots laser beams at metal powders to fuse particles together. As the powder bed is lowered, a new layer of particles is put on and then fused onto the emerging shape below it, slowly building up metal components and prototypes. The process, being employed by GE to make jet engine parts, produces little waste and allows for bespoke component designs on demand. See the video here.

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Bone by Henrik Balzer

BONE is a concept for the creation of tools through generative design and selective laser sintering. An algorithm is used to calculates bone-like structures, which are light-weight, yet durable. These structures can be used in tools. The concept aims to provide a near infinite toolbox, using a computer and an SLS machine. This setup, including a medium like steel powder, can be utilised to overcome scarcity of resources in certain environments. One potential field of application is space travel.

Get Ready: 3D Printing Will Explode Next Year, When Key Patents Expire

Here’s what’s holding back 3D printing, the technology that’s supposed to revolutionize manufacturing and countless other industries: patents. In February 2014, key patents that currently prevent competition in the market for the most advanced and functional 3D printers will expire, says Duann Scott, design evangelist at 3D-printing company Shapeways.

These patents cover a technology known as “laser sintering,” the lowest-cost 3D-printing technology. Because of its high resolution in all three dimensions, laser sintering can produce goods that can be sold as finished products.

Whenever someone talks about 3D printing revolutionizing manufacturing, they’re talking about the kinds of goods produced by, for example, the industrial-grade 3D printing machines used by Shapeways. The company used by countless industrial designers, artists and entrepreneurs who can’t afford their own 3D laser sintering printers, which can cost tens of thousands of dollars each.

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Once the key patents on 3D printing via laser sintering expire, we could see huge drop in the price of these devices, says Scott. This isn’t just idle speculation; when the key patents expired on a more primitive form of 3D printing, known asfused deposition modeling, the result was an explosion of open-source FDM printers that eventually led to iconic home and hobbyist 3D printer manufacturer Makerbot. And Makerbot was recently acquired by 3D-printing giant Stratasys for about $400 million in stock, plus a potential $200 million stock bonus. That acquisition was a homecoming of sorts for Makerbot; Stratasys was founded by Charles Hull, who invented 3D printing via FDM, the very technology on which Makerbot was based.

Within just a few years of the patents on FDM expiring, the price of the cheapest FDM printers fell from many thousands of dollars to as little as $300. This led to a massive democratization of hobbyist-level 3D printers and injected a huge amount of excitement into the nascent movement of “Makers,” who manufacture at home on the scale of one object at a time.

A similar sequence involving the lifting of intellectual property barriers, a rise in competition, and a huge drop in price is likely to play out again in laser deposition 3D printers, says Shapeways’ Scott. “This is what happened with FDM,” he says. “As soon as the patents expired, everything exploded and went open-source, and now there are hundreds of FDM machines on the market. An FDM machine was $14,000 five years ago and now it’s $300.”

Many of those inexpensive 3D printers are being manufactured in–where else?–China. In addition to a thriving home-grown industry in 3D printers, in 2012 China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology launched an initiative to fund 10 research centers devoted to 3D printing, at a cost of 200 million yuan ($32 million).

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One thing a lot of observers don’t understand about 3D printing is that not all 3D printing technologies are created equal. The revolution in manufacturing that was supposed to come with cheap, desktop 3D printers hasn’t materialized because, frankly, the models they produce are basically novelties, handy for giving you a feel for what something will look like in three dimensions, but not really usable for creating prototypes that can be directly translated into molds for mass production, and certainly not usable for creating finished goods.

With the expiration of patents on laser sintering 3D printing, however, all of that is about to change. Currently, designers who want to go from idea to finished product in a matter of hours, and create finished products to sell to the public–like these accessories for Google Glass–have to order 3D prints from a company like Shapeways. The problem is, Shapeways’ services are in such demand that it takes two weeks to get a finished product from the company, which is hardly the future of instant manufacturing that 3D printing was supposed to enable.

One of Shapeways’ problems is that the company can’t buy enough advanced 3D printers (the laser-sintering kind) to keep up with demand. This is because 3D Systems, the company that makes the models that Shapeways uses, has a 12- to 18-month waitlist for its printers. Cheap laser-sintering 3D printers of the sort made by Formlabs, which sells a desktop laser-sintering 3D printer for $3,300, could finally give people the ability to manufacture (plastic) parts of the same quality as those mass-produced through traditional means, such as injection molding. (Formlabs got around the patent issue by first getting sued by and thenlicensing the IP of 3D Systems, which controls the key patents that are set to expire.)

Or, if you believe Duann Scott, people will continue to use services like those of his company so that they can get even higher quality 3D prints, and in larger quantities–and, potentially, much faster than the current turnaround time of two weeks. All of this means that the release of these patents could be an important step in getting us to the future of mass customization and distributed manufacturing that we were promised.

harvest-tech.com
3D Printing: Where to Start? « Harvest Technologies

Just started learning about 3D printing? Let us give you hand and check out our latest blog featuring a beginner’s guide to 3D printing.

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http://www.harvest-tech.com/news/3d-printing-where-to-start/

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Founded in 1966, Paramount Industries, Inc. is among the world’s most experienced providers of product development services, including design engineering, additive manufacturing, rapid prototyping, direct digital manufacturing, rapid manufacturing, tooling, urethane casting, injection molding and contract manufacturing. Paramount’s principal engineering and manufacturing facilities are registered AS9100B with the International Aerospace Quality Group (IAQG), ISO 9001:2008 certified by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) registered. The company holds active memberships with the 3DS Users Group (3DSUG), Association for Manufacturing Excellence (AME), Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI), Keystone Chapter AUVSI, Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) and ASTM International – formerly known as the American Society for Testing and Materials.

NASA using 3D laser printing to create complex rocket parts

NASA engineers are using a 3D laser printing system to produce intricate metal parts such as rocket engine components for its next-generationSpace Launch System (SLS). The method called “selective laser melting “ (SLM) promises to streamline fabrication and significantly reduce production costs.

Rocket engines are as complex as precision watches, but watches don’t have to deal with highly corrosive or cryogenic liquids, gases hot enough to melt steel, or destructive stresses and vibrations. Rocket engines have to do all this the first time they’re used and they have to fit a great deal of gear into a very cramped space. Fabricating the parts for these engines is an exacting, time consuming and expensive task. Since many of their components are very intricate, making them is just the sort of job for 3D printers.

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For the SLS, NASA is using an M2 Cusing Machine built by Concept Laser, which is a division of Hoffman Innovation Group of Lichtenfels, Germany. The M2 is similar in principle to other 3D printers, but instead of causing polymers to set, the M2 works in stainless steel, hot-worked steel, aluminum, titanium and nickel alloy by means of a 200 W fiber laser.

“Basically, this machine takes metal powder and uses a high-energy laser to melt it in a designed pattern,” says Ken Cooper, advanced manufacturing team lead at the Marshall Center. “The laser will layer the melted dust to fuse whatever part we need from the ground up, creating intricate designs. The process produces parts with complex geometries and precise mechanical properties from a three-dimensional computer-aided design.”

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This method allows parts that once had to be built in simple sub-stages and then stuck together to be made in one go, which eliminates many fabrication problems and can reduce costs by as much as half. It also improves safety because metal powders like titanium burn in air, so the M2 is designed to fabricate the parts in a neutral atmosphere without supervision.

“This process significantly reduces the manufacturing time required to produce parts from months to weeks or even days in some cases,” said Andy Hardin, the integration hardware lead for the Engines Office in SLS. “It’s a significant improvement in affordability, saving both time and money. Also, since we’re not welding parts together, the parts are structurally stronger and more reliable, which creates an overall safer vehicle.”

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NASA plans to use the M2 to print engine parts for the J-2X engine, which is intended for the upper stage of the SLS. These parts will undergo structural and hot-fire tests and, if successful, will one day boost astronauts into space on missions to the Moon and beyond.

The first SLS unmanned developmental flight is targeted for the end of 2017.

Source: GizmagNASA

qz.com
3D printing will explode in 2014, thanks to the expiration of key patents

In February 2014, key patents that currently prevent competition in the market for the most advanced and functional 3D printers will expire,.

These patents cover a technology known as “laser sintering,” the lowest-cost 3D printing technology. Because of its high resolution in all three dimensions, laser sintering can produce goods that can be sold as finished products.

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Splite Personal Design Light (2013) by Jvantspijker Architecture Urbanism Research

Kickstarter project

We originally designed this project as an exhibition piece, bringing together photographs into a nice object. It was so unique and successful that we decided to bring it further to give more people access to this personal light. Now, we have developed a range of lights, based on the original idea. The different lamps can be used as hanging lights, wall lights or as table lights.

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Founded in 1966, Paramount Industries, Inc. is among the world’s most experienced providers of product development services, including design engineering, additive manufacturing, rapid prototyping, direct digital manufacturing, rapid manufacturing, tooling, urethane casting, injection molding and contract manufacturing. Paramount’s principal engineering and manufacturing facilities are registered AS9100B with the International Aerospace Quality Group (IAQG), ISO 9001:2008 certified by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) registered. The company holds active memberships with the 3DS Users Group (3DSUG), Association for Manufacturing Excellence (AME), Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI), Keystone Chapter AUVSI, Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) and ASTM International – formerly known as the American Society for Testing and Materials.

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…oh my god, Musk, just build the suit already.

(Quartz)  3D printing will explode in 2014, thanks to the expiration of key patents

Current 3D printers are cheap, but compared to where we’re going, they’re as Pong is to the iPhone.

Here’s what’s holding back 3D printing, the technology that’s supposed to revolutionize manufacturing and countless other industries: patents. In February 2014, key patents that currently prevent competition in the market for the most advanced and functional 3D printers will expire, says Duann Scott, design evangelist at 3D printing company Shapeways.

These patents cover a technology known as “laser sintering,” the lowest-cost 3D printing technology. Because of its high resolution in all three dimensions, laser sintering can produce goods that can be sold as finished products.

(more…)