Labor-day

From our Friends at Autism Women’s Network!

Image description: A square shaped meme with blue and green coloring blended together and the following words in white capital letters: “On this Labor Day, we recognize that close to 30% of adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities who are employed are working in sheltered workshops. 

In sheltered workshops employees:

Make less than the federal minimum wage, often less than $1 per hour
Are often segregated and isolated from the community 
Do not have the benefits of workers’ compensation
Do not have the privilege of collective bargaining
Are exploited and trapped in cycle of poverty. 

Labor is a disability rights civil issue.”

Facebook.com/AutismWomensNetwork

J.K. Rowling’s “Harry Potter” novels have a great many concerns that express the series’ larger themes of fascism, democracy and diversity. Among them is the struggle for the rights of house-elves, who play an enormous role in the functioning of the wizarding world even as they reap almost none of the rewards of the magical economy.

The house-elves emerge as characters in the “Harry Potter” novels much in the same way that children themselves might become aware of the workings of the economy as a whole. When Rowling’s characters initially enroll in Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, they think certain things there come to pass by magic. Food appears, beautifully prepared, on dinner tables. Beds are made, fires are lit.

But Harry and his friends Ron and Hermione come to learn that most of these tasks are performed by house-elves, who work not just at Hogwarts but in the homes of many wizarding families. In almost all cases, they are bound to their employers by magic, which is convenient for wizards in two ways: They can force these virtual slaves to do even the most dangerous and disagreeable tasks, and they can do it without paying the house-elves.

Ultimately Harry, Hermione and Ron decide that their concern for non-magical persons and certain classes of magical beings means that they must become advocates for house-elves’ rights as well.

But that is not the end of their education. They also learn that if you want to help people, you have to listen to what they want and need and respect their wishes. When the main characters in Rowling’s series inadvertently free a house-elf named Winky from her rigid wizard employer, they are initially surprised when she is devastated and becomes an alcoholic. The wizards saw her release as a simple matter of her rights, but Winky lost her home and what she perceived to be her family. Instead of just forcing her out of bad conditions, Harry, Hermione and Ron needed to convince Winky that a new kind of life would be better and then deliver on their promises.

And at the end of the “Harry Potter” novels, the three young characters get a powerful illustration of what solidarity really means.

—  “Why the Harry Potter books are the perfect way to explain Labor Day to kids” | by Alyssa Rosenberg for the Washington Post.
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September, the month to harvest grapes, isn’t just for the modern Virgo.

Libras and Scorpios are in on the labors of plowing and sowing fun for the month. Since the Middle Ages the zodiac symbols have shifted with changes in the months of the calendar. 

Zodiacal Sign of Virgo, about 1170s, Unknown. German, Hildesheim. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Woman Harvesting Grapes; Zodiacal Sign of a Libra
A Man Treading Grapes; Zodiacal Sign of Libra, early 1460s, Workshop of Willem Vrelant. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Plowing and Sowing; Zodiacal Sign of Scorpio, 1510-1520, Workshop of Master of James IV of Scotland. J. Paul Getty Museum.