Kupala-Night

Kupala Night (21/22 June) - Slavic Celebration of  summer solstice

Girls may float wreaths of flowers (often lit with candles) on rivers, and would attempt to gain foresight into their relationship fortunes from the flow patterns of the flowers on the river. Men may attempt to capture the wreaths, in the hope of capturing the interest of the woman who floated the wreath. (via Wikipedia)

Kupala night is a pagan holiday of the summer solstice that is still some people celebrate in Ukraine, Russia, Belarus, Poland and the Baltic countires. Kupala is the god of fertility.
Wreath is a mandatory ritual element of the celebration. Wreaths are usually done before the start of the celebration around the bonfire.
They usually destroyed at the and of the day: they burned at the bonfire or thrown into the water. The longer a wreath floats, the happier the owner will be and the longer life they will have. If a girl’s wreath did not drown and swam to the other side, it means that she will soon be married (it’s your chance, Belarus :))

Kupala Night - old Slavic celebration. It relates to summer solstice. Many of the rites related to this holiday within Slavic religious beliefs, due to the ancient Kupala rites, are connected with the role of water in fertility and ritual purification. On Kupala day, young people jump over the flames of bonfires in a ritual test of bravery and faith. The failure of a couple in love to complete the jump while holding hands is a sign of their destined separation. Girls may float wreaths of flowers (often lit with candles) on rivers, and would attempt to gain foresight into their relationship fortunes from the flow patterns of the flowers on the river. Men may attempt to capture the wreaths, in the hope of capturing the interest of the woman who floated the wreath.

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Kupala Night, also known as Ivan Kupala Day; Russian: Иван-Купала; Belarusian:Купалле; Ukrainian: Іван Купала; Polish: Noc Kupały), is celebrated in Ukraine, Belarus, Poland, and Russia currently on the night of 23/24 June in the Gregorian or New Style calendar, which is 6/7 July in the Julian or Old Style calendar still used by many Orthodox Churches. Calendar-wise, it is opposite to the winter holiday Koliada. The celebration relates to the summer solstice when nights are the shortest and includes a number of Slavic rituals. Many of the rites related to this holiday within Slavic religious beliefs, due to the ancient Kupala rites, are connected with the role of water in fertility and ritual purification. On Kupala day, young people jump over the flames of bonfires in a ritual test of bravery and faith. The failure of a couple in love to complete the jump while holding hands is asign of their destined separation. Girls may float wreaths of flowers (often lit with candles) on rivers, and would attempt to gain foresight into their relationship fortunes from the flow patterns of the flowers on the river. Men may attempt to capture the wreaths, in the hope of capturing the interest of the woman who floated the wreath.There is an ancient Kupala belief that the eve of Ivan Kupala is the only time of the year when ferns bloom. Prosperity, luck, discernment and power would befall on whoever finds a fern flower. Therefore, on that night, village folk would roam through the forests in search of magical herbs and especially the elusive fern flower.Traditionally, unmarried women, signified by the garlands on their hair, are the first to enter the forest. They are followed by young men. Therefore, the quest to find herbs and the fern flower may lead to the blooming of relationships between pairs of men and women within the forest.It is to be noted, however, that ferns are not angiosperms (flowering plants), and instead reproduce by spores; they cannot flower.  // wikipedia

Readers! Soon will be Kupala Night in Szczecin, so for sure, I will take for you a lot of photos! :)

Russian Folk Tale AU Aesthetic

(just a little something I’ve been rolling around in my head, based on the folk tale of Vasilisa and Baba Yaga, with a heavy dose of Gogol’s Dikanka stories)

Hux knows better than to look for the Fern Flower on Kupala Night. It had been a childish dream, once: find the elusive, sorcerous bloom in the forest, and learn the tongue of birds, open any lock, see all the treasures men keep hidden, take whatever shape he desires.

Ferns don’t bloom; he knows that now. Still, chores finished, he watches the rest of the villagers light the bonfires and dance. At midnight, he takes off his wreath, and lets the daisies and clover float downstream, hoping to divine his future.

Kylo has no interest in the villagers’ festivities, though he takes the offerings they leave at the forest edge.

Still, Kupala Night means power. At midnight, he douses himself with water from the river, and gathers the dreams floating downstream for his witch’s brew.

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Kupala Night, also known as Ivan Kupala Day (Feast of St. John the Baptist; Russian: Иван-Купала; Belarusian: Купалле; Ukrainian: Іван Купала; Polish: Noc Kupały) Many of the rites related to this holiday within Slavic religious beliefs, due to the ancient Kupala rites, are connected with the role of water in fertility and ritual purification.On Kupala day, young people jump over the flames of bonfires in a ritual test of bravery and faith. The failure of a couple in love to complete the jump while holding hands is asign of their destined separation.Taraxacum wreath floating on waterGirls may float wreaths of flowers (often lit with candles) on rivers, and would attempt to gain foresight into their relationship fortunes from the flow patterns of the flowers on the river. Men may attempt to capture the wreaths, in the hope of capturing the interest of the woman who floated the wreath.There is an ancient Kupala belief that the eve of Ivan Kupala is the only time of the year when ferns bloom. Prosperity, luck, discernment and power would befall on whoever finds a fern flower. Therefore, on that night, village folk would roam through the forests in search of magical herbs and especially the elusive fern flower.Traditionally, unmarried women, signified by the garlands on their hair, are the first to enter the forest. They are followed by young men. Therefore, the quest to find herbs and the fern flower may lead to the blooming of relationships between pairs of men and women within the forest.It is to be noted, however, that ferns are not angiosperms (flowering plants), and instead reproduce by spores; they cannot flower. IN THIS FEAST WODNIK, TOPIELEC AND UTOPIEC ARE MOST ACTIVE!

Kupala night tomorrow!! so ofc I had to quickly draw my witches dancing around the bonfire ^^

Bonus! Here are two perfect mixes I found for them: Mavka’s songs and surrealistyczny. If I were to make one, it would be basically these two plus some pagan metal. Thank you good people for making them ~

Kupala Night is celebrated in Ukraine, Belarus, Poland and Russia currently on the night of 6/7 July. The celebration relates to the summer solstice when nights are the shortest and includes a number of Pagan rituals.

The holiday was originally Kupala - a pagan fertility rite later accepted into the Orthodox Christian calendar. Due to the popularity of the pagan celebration with time it was simply accepted and reestablished as one of the native Christian traditions intertwined with local folklore.

On Kupala day, youth jump over the flames of bonfires in a ritual testing of one’s bravery and faith.

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Kupala Night (Noc Kupały) - is celebrated in Slavic countries on the night of 23 - 24 July.

Many of the rites related to this holiday within Slavic religious beliefs, due to the ancient Kupala rites, are connected with the role of water in fertility and ritual purification.

On Kupala day, young people jump over the flames of bonfires in a ritual test of bravery and faith. The failure of a couple in love to complete the jump while holding hands is a sign of their destined separation.

Girls may float wreaths of flowers (often lit with candles) on rivers, and would attempt to gain foresight into their relationship fortunes from the flow patterns of the flowers on the river. Men may attempt to capture the wreaths, in the hope of capturing the interest of the woman who floated the wreath.

It’s very interesting fete, read more on Wikipedia.