Killing-the-Buddha

There is nothing more dreadful than the habit of doubt. Doubt separates people. It is a poison that disintegrates friendships and breaks up pleasant relations. It is a thorn that irritates and hurts; it is a sword that kills.
—  Gautama Buddha
There is nothing more dreadful than the habit of doubt. Doubt separates people. It is a poison that disintegrates friendships and breaks up pleasant relations. It is a thorn that irritates and hurts; it is a sword that kills.
—  ― Gautama Buddha
There is nothing more dreadful than the habit of doubt. Doubt separates people. It is a poison that disintegrates friendships and breaks up pleasant relations. It is a thorn that irritates and hurts; it is a sword that kills.
—  Gautama Buddha
killingthebuddha.com
Religious Baggage < Killing the Buddha

<p>An excerpt from Ashley’s new e-book <em><a href=“http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00OS8LSLK”>You Were Strangers: Dispatches from Exile</a></em> </p> A religion magazine for people made anxious by churches

A beautiful, beautiful essay by my high school friend Ashley Makar, who is one of my favorite writers on religion, exile, and also cancer. (Ashley has been living with metastatic cancer since 2012.)

Ashley’s book, which is as consistently excellent as this essay, can be found here.

Ashley and I recently had a >1 hour conversation about faith, religious experience, death, writing, and other stuff, which can be downloaded here.

Since I said something yesterday about James Agee, and since there’s something in the works for closer to when the book comes out where I’ll be sharing some corner of a bar or bookstore with someone also reading and writing about him – well, since that’s been happening I thought I’d point you to something she’s written. It starts like this:

It is that clarity of mystery, that precision of blank—gesturing to certain immensities—that astounds me about James Agee’s peculiar use of colons. The epigraph to that American modernist’s “Description of Elysium” captured my attention as the sun went down on this past National Punctuation Day:

There: far, friends: ours: dear dominion:

From Ashley Makar’s “This is All One Colon,” Killing the Buddha, November 27, 2009

This, then, is how Leviticus begins and how it ends: Die now, or die later….The clearing where we stand is hemmed in on every side by darkness and foreboding. But: It’s still a clearing. It’s all we have. What do we do then–what can we do–on the only space that remains? We know what’s come before. We suspect what will come after. How do we now behave?
—  Michael Lesy, Killing the Buddha