Kawah-Ijen

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 BANYUWANGI – In East Java, Indonesia lies Kawah Ijen volcano, 2,600 meters tall (8,660ft), topped with a large caldera and a 200-meter-deep lake of sulfuric acid. The quietly active volcano emits gases through fumaroles inside the crater, and local miners have tapped those gases to earn a living. Stone and ceramic pipes cap the fumaroles, and inside, the sulfur condenses into a molten red liquid, dripping back down and solidifying into pure sulfur. Miners hack chunks off with steel bars, braving extremely dangerous gases and liquids with minimal protection, then load up as much as they can carry for the several kilometers to the weighing station. Loads can weigh from 45 to 90kg (100 - 200 lbs), and a single miner might make as many as two or three trips in a day. At the end of a long day, miners take home approximately Rp50,000 ($5.00 u.s.). The sulfur is then used for vulcanizing rubber, bleaching sugar and other industrial processes nearby.    © Fabrizio Alessi

nikonF2 , filmphotography

http://www.fabrizioalessi.com/kawah-ijen/

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Electric Blue Lava Flows From Indonesia’s Deadly Kawah Ijen Volcano

There is a group of volcanoes in Indonesia that spew lava that burns with  brilliant blue flames. Located in East Java, the Ijen volcano complex is a group of stratovolcanoes that are highly composed of sulfur, which when ignited produces a distinct blue-colored flame. At night when one of the active volcanoes of Ijen erupts, red lava flows run down the sulfuric slopes clothed in bright blue flames, resulting to an eerie, otherworldly spectacle. (via When On Earth)

So in my anthropology class, my teacher assigned a Wonder of the World project where we could make a Powerpoint, model, or poster on any wonder of the world we wanted. It didn’t even have to be an official wonder, just something we thought could be worthy of being one. So I had a great idea, thanks to sixpenceee, the Kawah Ijen Volcano. If you don’t know about this thing, let me fill you in.

Kawah Ijen is a stratovolcano in the Banyuwangi Regency of East Java, Indonesia. The lava in the volcano is colored red-orange during the day, but at night is when something amazing happens. Due to the high amounts of pure sulfur in the volcano, it gets burnt by the lava and turns the it a neon blue color! Don’t believe me? LOOK AT THIS!

AND THIS!

AND THIS!!

Seriously if you don’t think this is the tightest shit, then get out of my face! Nature is fucking awesome and I love it! HUGE HUGE thanks to sixpenceee for the idea for this project. I seriously love your blog and will forever be a follower! I just hope you see this.

~spoopybacon

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Sulfur Mining at Indonesia’s Ijen Crater Lake

To view more photos and videos from the Ijen sulfur lake, visit the Kawah Ijen location page.

High up in the East Java region of Indonesia, the Ijen volcano is a site of both magnificent beauty and treacherous working conditions.

Stretching across a width of 1km (3,280ft), a bright turquoise lake draws traveling Instagrammers from across the world to capture its splendor in the rising sun. Though beautiful, the lake contains some of the most acidic water on the globe as a result of sulfur present in the volcanic gas.

Local organizations have taken advantage of the sulfur and developed a laborious mining operation to fuel other industries on the island. After channeling through a series of pipes, the condensed gasses pour out into pools of bright yellow molten sulfur.

Mine workers break apart the cooled sulfur by hand and then carry the 70-90kg (165-200lb) baskets up the steep crater rim before embarking on a 3km (1.86mi) hike to their destination in the Pultuding valley. The approximately 200 laborers often make this trip multiple times per day for very slight earnings.

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Sulfur mining in Kawah Ijen

In East Java, Indonesia lies Kawah Ijen volcano, 2,600 meters tall (8,660ft), topped with a large caldera and a 200-meter-deep lake of sulfuric acid. The quietly active volcano emits gases through fumaroles inside the crater, and local miners have tapped those gases to earn a living. Stone and ceramic pipes cap the fumaroles, and inside, the sulfur condenses into a molten red liquid, dripping back down and solidifying into pure sulfur. Miners hack chunks off with steel bars, braving extremely dangerous gases and liquids with minimal protection, then load up as much as they can carry for the several kilometers to the weighing station. Loads can weigh from 45 to 90kg (100 - 200 lbs), and a single miner might make as many as two or three trips in a day. At the end of a long day, miners take home approximately Rp50,000 ($5.00 u.s.). The sulfur is then used for vulcanizing rubber, bleaching sugar and other industrial processes nearby.

Photographer Olivier Grunewald has made several trips into the sulfur mine in the crater of the Kawah Ijen volcano, bringing with him equipment to capture surreal images lit by moonlight, torches, and the blue flames of burning molten sulfur.  Mr. Grunewald has been kind enough to share with us the other-worldly photos of these men as they do their hazardous work under the light of the moon.

 

Credit: Olivier Grunewald/The Big Picture

Olivier Grunewald’s official website

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A Perilous Turquoise Beauty

In Indonesia, a volcano called Kawah Ijen towers up 2,600 metres above East Java. At its peak is the world’s largest acidic crater lake, 200 metres deep and filled with the brilliant turquoise flames of burning molten sulfur. This sulfur comes from an active gaseous vent on the lakeshore, and it is capitalized on by local mining operations: the gases are capped by a network of manmade pipes so that the sulfur consenses into a molten red liquid, which then solidifies into pure, bright yellow sulfur. Under the light of the moon, pitifully-paid miners trek up the volcano and face the noxious fumes with barely any protection, quarrying the rich, solid sulfur deposits by breaking it into manageable chunks. They then carry sulfur-laden baskets (weighing up to 90 kg) out of the crater and several long kilometres down to the weighing station—not just once, but several times a day. The sulfur is used in a variety of industrial processes, including vulcanizing rubber and bleaching sugar. Miners extract approximately 14 tons a day, which, incredibly, is just 20 percent of the volcano’s awe-inspiring daily deposit.

Check out the full gallery by Olivier Grunewald

Photographer Olivier Grunewald kneels to get a photograph on a small rock outcropping in the acid crater lake of Kawah Ijen.

"The feeling is like being on another planet" he said. Grunewald lost one camera and two lenses to the harsh conditions in the crater, and when it was over, he threw all of his clothes in the garbage, as the sulfuric smell was so strong and would not wash out.

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Remarkable photos show Indonesian volcanoes spewing blue flames

These amazing images by Olivier Grunewald show the bright blue glow of several volcanoes located within the 20km wide Ijen Caldera in East Java, Indonesia

Kawah Ijen is one of several volcanoes located within the 20 km wide Ijen Caldera in East Java, Indonesia. The caldera of Kawah Ijen harbors a kilometer-wide, turquoise colored, acidic crater lake that leaks sulphurous gases constantly. At night the hot gases burn to emit an eerie blue glow that is unique to Kawah Ijen. The gases emerge from the cracks in the volcano at high pressure and temperature, up to 600°C, and when they come in contact with the air, they ignite, sending flames up to 16 feet high. Some of the gases condense into liquid sulfur, and continues to burn as it flows down the slopes giving the feeling of blue lava flowing.

Kawah Ijen. A Brand New Project by Fabrizio Alessi

BANYUWANGI (ELEPHANT GUN) – Deep in East Java, Indonesia lies Kawah Ijen volcano, 2,600 meters tall (8,660ft), topped with a large caldera and a 200-meter-deep lake of sulfuric acid. The quietly active volcano emits gases through fumaroles inside the crater, and local miners have tapped those gases to earn a living. See a brand new set of powerful images by Fabrizio Alessi featuring the volcano and its miners now on Elephant Gun (750grain.com). 

All images © Fabrizio Alessi

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Blue Lava by Olivier Grunewald
gifs by radivs

Kawah Ijen Volcano, Java, Indonesia

T[he] video shows blue glowing lava escaping from Kawah Ijen volcano in East Java. The blue glow is caused by the burning sulphur that is found at this site.
Miners have run ceramic pipes from vents in the side of the mountain to collection points inside a large crater where the molten chemical is left to cool before being broken up and carried away.