Yahya Abu Romman, a 22-year-old languages major, had just graduated from university. To celebrate, he planned a six-week trip to the U.S., where his brother, uncles and aunts and more than a dozen cousins have lived for years.

With good grades, an engaging personality and fluency in three languages — English, Arabic and Spanish — he had worked as a nature conservation ranger while studying, and had his pick of jobs with tour companies in Jordan, a strong U.S. ally.

In 2015, Abu Romman was issued a tourist visa at the U.S. embassy in Amman, good for five years. With money from a graduation present, he bought a round-trip ticket and landed at Chicago’s O'Hare International Airport a few days after the start of President Trump’s travel ban on the citizens of seven predominantly Muslim countries.

That’s where the positive impression of the U.S. he’d inherited from his father came to a screeching halt.

“My dad is a graduate from the University of Illinois,” says Abu Romman. “He always told me America is the land of justice, land of opportunities, of generosity. That there are very kind people. And there are. But I think things have changed.”

Deported With A Valid U.S. Visa, Jordanian Says Message Is ‘You’re Not Welcome’

Photo: Jane Arraf/NPR