John-rolfe

Wanted to try blend two different type of effects into one and this is the result. And once again I did not have a story in mind while working on this, so now I would love to hear your ideas. :D

PS: I have made small adjustments to Belle’s facial features since I uploaded the WME video. Her proportions made her head look really big (compared to John) before and it should be better now.

Watch How I Made This + More Animation Edits

“If I ever have a chance to visit Disneyland, I’m definitely going to ask Pocahontas about John Rolfe. I’m curious to see how she would react or what she’d say about him. If he’s her friend, a former boyfriend or someone else… Or does she even know him? I’m also curious what Tinker Bell or other fairies would say about fairies from the old franchise like Prilla and Rani. I really wonder if their face characters even know about their existence.”

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Wanted to try blend two different type of effects into one and this is the result. (^_^)

Final Results + More Animation Edits

So I recently rewatched Pocahontas I and II

And I want to say that sorry not sorry, I love the sequel. Even if we don’t take in account the historical context, Pocahontas is better with John Rolfe. 


John Smith showed hints of his self-centered personnality in the first movie. However Pocahontas didn’t see them, and I guess most of you also, because she was too interested in the fact that someone different was caring for her. She did not focus on the real him because she focused on the relationship she had with him. She was in love of course, but she was in love with the feeling and not the person. John Smith wanted to change her since the beggining. May I remind you that he wanted to kill her, the only reason he spared her is because she was attractive. If it had been someone else, he’d have shot. But my point is, he always wanted to change her, to sink her into his culture. At a certain moment, when she taught him about hers, he shut up, but as she returned to London, all he wanted was her to stay that way: whitened.

John Rolfe though, cared for her since he got to know her. Of course, he was surprised at first that she, a woman, could have such impact with her people, because in his society, women had no right to say anything. He had to get used to the etiquette of the Native-American culture. But he always cared about who she really was. He never wanted to change her, he always embraced her self. We see it when he gives Poca her mother’s necklace back. He learnt to love her and they have very much in common, though it doesn’t seem so. 

Plus, to her, Smith was dead. She said it herself: it’s hard to say goodbye. But when she arrived in London, she had moved on. When she knew that Smith was still alive, she was slightly happy, but she was embarassed as well. She already started to have feelings for Rolfe and she was stuck because she didn’t want to push Smith away.

If Smith and her would have been together, they would have been unhappy because none of them wanted to abandon their customs. Each of them would have regrets. Rolfe was all for Pocahontas, and didn’t mind leaving all he had behind. She is better with him than with Smith, and she knows it. She knows that being with Rolfe will keep her free. And even if she could have been happy with either of them, being with Smith would have emprisonned her.

Disney for the first time did not put a princess with the first guy that showed interest. Disney made it more realistic, but because of that, most people hated it. Disney for once taught that love was not as simple as they supposed so. 

I personnaly love the sequel.

Rolfe is such a cutie I can’t even omg. 

I could actually write an essay about the subject.

Rapunzel just became the first Disney Princess to do this, and it’s a big deal

You know how the Disney fairy tale goes: Boy meets girl, one of them happens to be royalty, there’s a bad guy to be fought, the hero wins, and everyone lives happily ever after — yay!

That’s been the norm since the very, very beginning of Disney Princesses. Each princess — whether in their “main” movie, or one of their straight-to-VHS movies — has always, eventually, gotten married to their respective prince*, and then lived happily ever after. Except for Rapunzel.

Rapunzel just became the first Disney princess to straight-up reject a marriage proposal.

Friday night, Disney Channel premiered their latest Disney Channel Original Movie, Tangled: Before Ever After. The movie set up the story for the new Disney Channel show, Tangled: The Series. The series is a sequel to the movie Tangled, but a prequel to the Tangled short, Tangled Ever After. GOT THAT? (Also, spoilers ahead for everything Tangled.)

So while, yes, we already know that somewhere down the road Rapunzel and Flynn Rider Eugene Fitzherbert get married and live happily ever after, it was not smooth sailing for them.

During Tangled: Before Ever After, Eugene decides he wants to propose to Rapunzel, and does so in front of the whole royal court. Instead of saying yes, Rapunzel says no.

Disney Channel

TBH, didn’t realize Disney Princesses could say no to marriage proposals, because we’ve never seen it happen before. This is kinda a big deal. We’re used to seeing this when it comes to the end of Disney movies:

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We’ve never seen a princess hightail it away from a suitor, just leaving him hanging there, diamond ring still in hand.


Disney Channel

Later on in the movie, Rapunzel (now with her magical hair again — it’s a long story) explains to Eugene that she is not ready to be tied down yet (!!), and he apologizes to her for putting her on the spot with the proposal in front of everyone (!!!).

“I don’t quite understand why you said no, but I promise to do everything I can until I do,” Eugene tells her. Honestly, this is groundbreaking because we have never seen a Disney Princess go through relationship troubles before. Disney Princesses are JUST LIKE US!

Disney Channel

It’s clear that Rapunzel and Flynn are not done, and are not breaking up. However, she just asks that they table the marriage proposal for the time being, and asks Eugene to “please…be patient with me.” (It is worth pointing out at this point that Rapunzel spent the first 18 years of her life locked up in a tower, and has only now just reentered the real world and is still getting used to everything. Girl still isn’t even wearing shoes. So yeah, rushing into a marriage is not the best idea ever.)

As Disney princesses continue to evolve and change over time, Rapunzel just became the latest one to break the mold we’re so used to. While she’s certainly got that ~fairy tale~ love, for her, it’s not coming easy. Relationships are hard work, and it’s not just riding away into the sunset in  a horse-drawn carriage with a man you just met.

Blondie, take as much time as you need to figure out what YOU want in life, and if marrying Eugene is part of it, then we’re so happy for you two. But if you’d much rather scale the city’s walls and run as far away as possible, that is perfectly fine, too. Go figure out what you want for your next new dream — no relationship pressure, whatsoever.

*Except for Pocahontas, who fell for John Rolfe instead, #Pocahontas:JourneyToANewWorld

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You can hate the Disney sequels all you like

But I will defend the sequel characters with my life.

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My John Rolfe cosplay I wore to Fanime 2017! Even attended the Disney Gathering. It was a lot of fun, and I was so happy to be recognized (and to the person who complimented me/was thrilled to finally find a Rolfe cosplayer, you’re awesome!)

Courtesy of Ruth Cankudutawin Hopkins, The Truth Behind Pocahontas.

Image description: a picture of Disney’s version of Pocahontas with the following words:
“Pocahontas was a nickname (meaning The Naughty One). Her real name was Matoaka. If we believe John Smith’s account of events, she would have been 10 or 11 when she met him. That’s hardly a romantic scenario, unless you’re a pedophile.

Pocahontas was kidnapped by the English. She was imprisoned at the Jamestown colony for over a year, where she was assaulted. While still a teenager, our young heroine married John Rolfe. Marrying the Englishman was a condition of her release.

Pocahontas was then taken to England, as a sort of living specimen and advertisement for colonization. She died at the tender age of 21, unaware that the English would create the Pocahontas Myth; one where she was the good Indian who rescued the whiteman from her brutish, savage Tribesmen.

This myth birthed many colonial stereotypes of Native people and was used as justification to make war against us.”