Joe-McNally

No matter how much crap you gotta plow through to stay alive as a photographer, no matter how many bad assignments, bad days, bad clients, snotty subjects, obnoxious handlers, wigged-out art directors, technical disasters, failures of the mind, body, and will, all the shouldas, couldas, and wouldas that befuddle our brains and creep into our dreams, always remember to make room to shoot what you love. It’s the only way to keep your heart beating as a photographer.
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Joe McNally

Lensblr Quote of the Day (reprised)

Michelle Pfeiffer & the “Hope Diamond” photographed by Joe McNally for LIFE magazine (March, 1995)

Presentation of the America’s national jewels at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History.

The HOPE DIAMOND, the most famous (and infamous) jewel in the world. Named for the London banker who bought the stone in 1830, it is the second largest (45.52 carats)—and reputedly the darkest—blue diamond ever discovered. In all but the brightest light it smolders like a huge Bullen eye. Yet when flooded with ultraviolet rays, it glows red-orange, an eerie echo of its bloody legend. The jewel, so the story goes, was once the eye of a Hindu idol, Rama Sita. When it was stolen, Rama cursed everyone who would come to possess the stone. Indeed, fate has not been kind to those who have owned the eye of the god. Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette were beheaded. Simon Montharides, a wealthy Greek jeweler, fell to his death from a cliff. In the 19th century, Subaya, the favorite of Turkish sultan Abdul Hamid, was murdered. And Evalyn Walsh McLean, a flashy Washington, D.C., socialite who sometimes let her Great Dane wear the diamond, lost her son in a car crash and her daughter to suicide. But the curse, says jeweler Ronald Winston, whose firm acquired the Hope from the McLean estate and donated it (along with other celebrated gems) to the Smithsonian, has only increased the value of the big blue pebble. At auction, Winston says, the Hope could fetch as much as $200 million.

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Great advice from some truly great photographer’s and they all touch on the same points.
Don’t go into debt, slash your expenses, don’t be fearful, believe in your skills, stick with it and work hard!!