Jackson-Pollock

In the Studio: Postwar Abstract Painting

Ever wondered how Agnes Martin balanced perfection and imperfection in her gridded compositions, why Jackson Pollock was dubbed “Jack the Dripper,” how Mark Rothko sought to make viewers cry, or what a Willem de Kooning painting sounds like? Sign up for “In the Studio: Postwar Abstract Painting,” MoMA’s newest free online course—now open for enrollment at mo.ma/coursera.

This course welcomes anyone to tap into the processes, materials, and minds of seven New York School artists including Martin, Pollock, Rothko, de Kooning and Barnett Newman, Ad Reinhardt, and Yayoi Kusama. Combining studio techniques, visual analysis, and art historical insight, it offers an opportunity to experience postwar abstract painting from an artist’s point of view. 

Thanks to @vw​ for helping to bring MoMA Courses to learners all over world!

Jackson Pollock, Untitled, Ink on paper, c. 1950

In the Studio: Postwar Abstract Painting

MoMA’s newest free online course, “In the Studio: Postwar Abstract Painting,” has begun, and registration ends tomorrow! Taught by conservator, art historian, and artist Corey D’Augustine, the course combines studio demonstrations, walkthroughs of MoMA’s galleries, close visual analysis of paintings in the collection, and art historical insight to introduce you to seven New York School artists—Barnett Newman, Willem de Kooning, Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Agnes Martin, Ad Reinhardt, and Yayoi Kusama. Says D’Augustine: “The more you know about how a painting is done, the more you can recreate the artist’s own perspective and intention, the more you can understand it.” Sign up at mo.ma/inthestudio.

[Mark Rothko. No. 16 (Red, Brown, and Black). 1958. Oil on canvas. Mrs. Simon Guggenheim Fund. © 2017 Kate Rothko Prizel & Christopher Rothko/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]